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Can Setting a Deadline Put an End to Breast Cancer?

Can Setting a Deadline Put an End to Breast Cancer? | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"Unfortunately, discovery doesn’t answer to deadlines.

In September 2010 the National Breast Cancer Coalition announced that it was setting a deadline to “end breast cancer” by January 1, 2020.  The organization’s Web site shows a digital clock ticking off the seconds, minutes, days, and years left till the deadline. The NBCC, located in Washington, D.C., is a breast cancer advocacy organization that has been highly effective over the past two decades in fund-raising for research on breast cancer and promoting education and access to care."

Susan Zager's insight:

The article states: "Although we speak easily about breast cancer as if it were a single entity, breast cancer comprises at least five different types, which are, at least to some extent, distinct in terms of their molecular signatures, pathology, prognosis, and treatment.  The slow pace of acquiring new knowledge that would lend itself to prevention is a reflection of the bewildering complexity of the disease.  But this very complexity also means that there are many different points at which the development and progression of the disease could be intercepted.  One of the few certainties about the science of breast cancer is that no one can predict what the next breakthrough will be."

This article raises intersting questions as to whether or not setting this deadline can and will really bring some type of vaccine to prevent breast cancer. Only time will tell.

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20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer published

20th annual edition of NCCN Guidelines for Breast Cancer published | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer globally and the leading cause of cancer-related death in women. However, the incidence of breast cancer has somewhat stabilized over the past few decades, and breast cancer mortality appears to be declining, suggesting a benefit from the combination of early detection and more effective treatment

From a surgical standpoint, said Dr. Gradishar, axillary lymph node dissection was the standard of care in 1996. Today, the less invasive sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is the standard of care for patients with early-stage breast cancer to determine spread of the disease, which has removed the risk of unnecessary extensive lymph node removal, as well as decreased the risks of post-surgical complications.

"How we thought about adjuvant therapy has changed," said Dr. Gradishar. "Physicians used to look at the number of nodes as a determinant of whether a patient was a candidate for chemotherapy, as well as what kind of chemotherapy was appropriate. Now we use genomic profiling to influence our decision-making. Additionally, the chemotherapy regimens have changed and endocrine therapy options have expanded, as has the duration of therapy."

Indeed, genomic testing and targeted therapies have changed the course of breast cancer treatment. In particular, according to Dr. Gradishar, 20 years ago human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2)-positive disease was not listed in the guidelines, and today the NCCN Guidelines recommendations include a cadre of successful neoadjuvant and adjuvant chemotherapies for people with HER2-positive disease.

Susan Zager's insight:

To see these new guidelines go to: http://www.nccn.org/patients/guidelines/cancers.aspx#breast


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A Biological Quest Leads To A New Kind Of Breast Cancer Drug

A Biological Quest Leads To A New Kind Of Breast Cancer Drug | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"Each year, the Food and Drug Administration approves dozens of drugs, but often those medicines don't make a huge difference to people with disease. That's because these "new" drugs are often very much like existing medicines — or are, in fact, existing medicines, approved for a slightly different purpose.

But every now and then the FDA approves a truly new drug. And that's the story of Pfizer's palbociclib, brand name Ibrance, which the agency approved for the treatment of a common form of advanced breast cancer.

"What you're seeing here is a very important step in the right direction. But it's one step, and we have to follow the journey out to the very end, which is preventing metastasis as well as preventing cell division."

- Dr. Larry Norton, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center

The story of this drug illustrates the challenging road that connects a fundamental discovery in biology to a pill that can make a difference.

This pill's story began years ago in academic labs that were churning out the basic science that explains biology but rarely makes the headlines. Scientists who were trying to understand how healthy cells divide uncovered one critical step in that process, a step controlled by a set of enzymes known (for short) as CDK4/6.
Susan Zager's insight:

For more information about this drug and where to look for financial assistance go to:  http://www.pfizerrxpathways.com/?step=1


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A Cancer Cluster Is Tough to Prove

A Cancer Cluster Is Tough to Prove | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"Last month, thousands of Marines and their families were blocked in federal court from pursuing their claim that the government had given them cancer. The decision, involving people exposed to contaminated drinking water while stationed at Camp Lejeune, a base in North Carolina, didn’t consider the science.

Long before expert witnesses could be called to testify, a United States Court of Appeals let stand its earlier ruling that the lawsuit had come too late. It failed to meet the requirements of a state statute banning claims arising more than 10 years after the final occurrence of a harmful act.

The genetic mutations that cause cancer can take decades to manifest themselves, far longer than the North Carolina statute of repose allowed. But the laws we cobble together often trump those of science. And even when legal obstacles can be overcome, a link between a cancer and environmental pollutants is exceedingly difficult to establish, whether in a laboratory or a court of law….

Especially puzzling were some 80 Lejeune veterans who came forward with diagnoses of male breast cancer, some at an unusually early age. The annual incidence of this condition is about 1.4 cases per 100,000 men — about 1 percent of the rate for women."

Susan Zager's insight:

This is shocking. There's no reason these marines and their families should be blocked by the court. because of the claim by the court of appeals that it "had come too late." This article brings about the important science being missed and how we hope  that this case can come to life with the right legal action to bring life to this important case.

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FDA approves Ibrance for postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer

FDA approves Ibrance for postmenopausal women with advanced breast cancer | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today granted accelerated approval to Ibrance (palbociclib) to treat advanced (metastatic) breast cancer.
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Myriad Genetics Ending Patent Dispute on Breast Cancer Risk Testing

Myriad Genetics Ending Patent Dispute on Breast Cancer Risk Testing | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
The biotech company, the subject of a 2013 Supreme Court ruling that genes cannot be patented, said it was giving up trying to stop other companies from offering tests.
Susan Zager's insight:

According to the article, "Settlements have been reached with LabCorp, Invitae and Pathway Genomics. Mr. Rogers said Myriad was in talks with Ambry, Quest Diagnostics, GeneDx and Counsyl." It's about time!

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Some Breast Cancer Patients Lack Knowledge About The Health Issue

Some Breast Cancer Patients Lack Knowledge About The Health Issue | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
A new analysis shows that many women with breast cancer may lack knowledge regarding their illness. In fact, the findings show how minority patients may be less likely than others to know and report accurate information about their tumors' characteristics.
Susan Zager's insight:

For more information go to: http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/PressRelease/pressReleaseId-115362.html


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Gene linked to aggressive breast cancer

Gene linked to aggressive breast cancer | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"UK scientists have linked(link is external) an overactive gene to an aggressive type of breast cancer.

The team, from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and the University of Cambridge, identified the BCL11A gene as especially active in ‘triple negative’ breast cancer – an aggressive form of the disease accounting for about one in five cases.

"This study is a promising step forward" - Dr Emma Smith, Cancer Research UK

Welcoming the findings – based on an analysis of cancer samples from almost 3000 women - Dr Emma Smith, senior science information officer at Cancer Research UK, said: “Figuring out the genes that play a role in triple negative breast cancer could lead to new ways to tackle the disease - so this study is a promising step forward.

“The next steps will be finding out if the gene plays the same role in causing breast cancer in women, and whether drugs can be developed to target the faulty molecules," she added.

Breast cancer is now known to exist in 10 distinct subtypes based on tumours’ genetic make-up. Most triple-negative breast cancer tumours are of a genetic type called ‘basal-like’.

BCL11A was found to be overactive in tumour samples from around eight in 10 patients with ‘basal-like’ disease.

Prognosis for triple negative cancers is poorer than for other forms, and limited knowledge of the distinct genetic properties of the disease has made the development of new treatments difficult.

Therapies used in treating other subtypes – such as trastuzumab and tamoxifen – do not work on this type of cancer, because tumour cells lack three different ‘receptor’ molecules that are targeted by the treatments."

Susan Zager's insight:

To read the study in Nature Communications go to: http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150109/ncomms6987/full/ncomms6987.html


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Green Hill Tea's comment, February 17, 1:27 AM
Superb Article
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FDA grants fast track status to IMMU-132 for triple-negative breast cancer | Hematology Oncology

FDA grants fast track status to IMMU-132 for triple-negative breast cancer | Hematology Oncology | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Hematology Oncology | The FDA today granted fast track status to sacituzumab govitecan, an antibody–drug conjugate in development for treatment of patients with triple-negative breast cancer who failed prior therapies for metastatic disease, according to the drug’s manufacturer.Sacituzumab govitecan (IMMU-132, Immunomedics) is formed by using the moderately-toxic SN-38 — the active metabolite of
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20 years after initiating preventive tamoxifen, less breast cancer but no survival benefit

20 years after initiating preventive tamoxifen, less breast cancer but no survival benefit | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"Five years of tamoxifen provided 20 years of breast cancer prevention to some at-risk women who took it prophylactically.

However, their 20-year all-cause mortality was no different from those taking placebo (182 vs. 166 deaths), nor was their mortality from breast cancer (31 vs. 26, respectively), Jack Cuzick, Ph.D., said at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“While we saw clear, lasting benefits of tamoxifen in reducing breast cancer incidence, uncertainty with respect to mortality remains,” said Dr. Cuzick, the John Snow professor of epidemiology at Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine at Queen Mary University, London.

He suggested that, in light of the small number of deaths, the study was not sufficiently powered to detect any significant survival difference. But women in the IBIS-1 trial will continue to be observed, and future analyses could clarify the issue, he added.

“Although 20 years seems like a long follow-up time, it is actually too early to make any clear statement about mortality,” he said. “However, we are concerned about an excess emergence of ER-negative tumors, which we saw after 10 years.”

The study was simultaneously published on Dec. 13 in Lancet Oncology"

Susan Zager's insight:

To see the published study on Dec 13 in Lance Oncology, go to: http://www.thelancet.com/journals/lanonc/article/PIIS1470-2045%2814%2971171-4/fulltext


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New breast cancer vaccine proves safe in early clinical trial

New breast cancer vaccine proves safe in early clinical trial | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Results of an early clinical trial suggest that a breast cancer vaccine developed at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is safe in patients with metastatic breast cancer.
Susan Zager's insight:

To see the study go to: http://clincancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/20/23/5964.abstract


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Erika Kettlewell's curator insight, December 4, 2014 3:11 AM

A study from Washington University School of Medicine has developed a vaccine to help fight breast cancer. So far they have tested the vaccine on 14 patients who have so far seen improvements such as slowing down the growth rate of the cancer cells and in half of the women actually stopped the progression of the cancer all together. This is a great step in finding a cure for breast cancer!! 

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'3 specific cells' combo behind breast cancer spread, confirm scientists | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis

'3 specific cells' combo behind breast cancer spread, confirm scientists | Latest News & Updates at Daily News & Analysis | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
'3 specific cells' combo behind breast cancer spread, confirm scientists - In a new study, scientists have found that it is the specific trio of cells that causes breast cancer to spread.
A study, led by researchers at the NCI-designated Albert Einstein Cancer Center and Montefiore Einstein Center for Cancer Care, combining tumor cells from patients with breast cancer with a laboratory model of blood vessel lining provides the most compelling evidence so far, and the findings could lead to better tests for predicting whether a woman's breast cancer will spread and to new anti-cancer therapies.
Susan Zager's insight:

For more information go to: http://stke.sciencemag.org/content/7/353/ra112.abstract


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New Cancer Therapy: Using Oncolytic Viruses to Treat Metastatic Disease | Physicians News

"There exists a “type” of cancer that is common yet rarely discussed—metastatic disease, or cancer that has spread from the part of the body where it originated (the primary tumor) to another (such as lungs, bones or liver). Each year, at least 2.6 million people in the developed world die of cancers that have metastasized. Although much research is being done to combat primary tumors, there still exists a crucial need to find a treatment that can be effective against metastatic cancer, or “mets.”

Could a virus be the key to finally beating the mets? The question is not as odd as it might sound. Virotherapy or oncolytic virus therapy involves the conversion of viruses into cancer-fighting agents by reprogramming them to attack cancerous cells, while healthy cells remain relatively undamaged. Specifically, viruses can be harnessed to infect, multiply within and subsequently lyse cancer cells; the virus targets the tumor and protects normal tissue.

Several types of oncolytic viruses have been developed to date. One of them, the reovirus, is a non-enveloped virus with a double-stranded, segmented RNA genome that forms particles that are 60 to 90 nm. The reovirus preferentially replicates in cancer cells that feature a common mutation known as an “activated Ras pathway,” while sparing normal cells. This makes it intrinsically tumor selective without the need for any genetic manipulation."

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CyberKnife Treatment Helps Metastatic Breast Cancer Patient

CyberKnife Treatment Helps Metastatic Breast Cancer Patient | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"RENO, Nev., Oct. 21, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- As the second-most diagnosed cancer in women in the U.S., breast cancer impacts the lives of many. Debbie Black, a Nevada resident, is among those whose life has been dramatically impacted by the disease.

Initially diagnosed with stage II breast cancer at the age of 30, Black underwent aggressive chemotherapy and hormonal treatment. She was cancer-free for more than a decade until she began experiencing the loss of feeling in the left side of her body.

Following tests, Black learned her cancer had come back and spread to her brain. She underwent surgery to remove the majority of the brain tumor, but due to the tumor's size and proximity to critical anatomy, a small portion had to be left behind. Additionally, it was discovered that a second smaller tumor had formed in her brain. Black's doctors suggested CyberKnife to treat both the original remaining tumor and the second tumor discovered.

"CyberKnife was the most amazing treatment I had ever experienced," said Black. "It was a piece of cake and walk in the park compared to past treatments I had undergone."

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Wy Woods Harris's curator insight, October 23, 2014 10:12 AM

I am looking at what might benefit the cancer care and cure community.

 

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Black women less likely to take breast cancer hormone therapy

Black women less likely to take breast cancer hormone therapy | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
(Reuters Health) – Among early-stage breast cancer patients in the U.S., black women are less likely than white women to take their prescribed hormone medications, according to a new study that partly - but not entirely - blames economic disparities between races.
Susan Zager's insight:

To see the study in the Journal of Oncology go to: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2015/02/17/JCO.2014.58.3062


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Alethia Biotherapeutics Submits a Clinical Trial Application (CTA) for a Phase I Study with AB-16B5, an Inhibitor of EMT in Patients with Advanced Cancers

Alethia Biotherapeutics Submits a Clinical Trial Application (CTA) for a Phase I Study with AB-16B5, an Inhibitor of EMT in Patients with Advanced Cancers | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
MONTREAL, QUEBEC--(Marketwired - Feb. 17, 2015) - Alethia Biotherapeutics Inc., a privately held biotechnology company, announced today that it has submitted a Clinical Trial Application (CTA) with Health Canada to initiate a Phase I clinical trial with AB-16B5, a fully humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)....
Susan Zager's insight:

For more information about triple negative breast cancer vaccines go to: http://www.antigenexpress.com/

and also look at videos related to this topic go to: https://www.youtube.com/watch?list=UUDz8HHZYm1hG9WDiSnigK6g&v=7CY3J20ZoI8

and  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j4F9LMzB8yc


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A lot to love: Celebrating targeted drugs and another Valentine’s Day with stable cancer

A lot to love: Celebrating targeted drugs and another Valentine’s Day with stable cancer | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"Thank you for all of the wonderful responses we received about the Food and Drug Administration’s (FDA) approval of a drug for patients with advanced metastatic breast cancer. It's not always easy to decide which research has legs and is worth investing in— and I take that task seriously— but when something you believe in succeeds, the reward and sense of inspiration that follows can be immense. The FDA’s approval of Ibrance (palbociclib), a drug that the Noreen Fraser Foundation (NFF) helped fund the development for, did just that.

I have been fighting breast cancer for 13 years, and during that time I have done my homework. I have pored through research, and I have become familiar with the various institutions that are working in the breast cancer arena.

Before I helped co-create and co-produce Stand Up To Cancer, I searched for answers, primarily so my daughter (who was 10 years old at the time) would never hear the words, “You have cancer," as I did.

About halfway through this process, I concluded that a cure may never come. That realization can shock and shake a person up. But, in acknowledging that possibility, I concluded that finding a way to live with and contain cancer would be the next best step. Drugs like Ibrance have the potential to help breast cancer patients do that precisely. Sure, the drug isn't a cure, but targeted therapies like Ibrance can allow cancer to become a chronic disease like AIDS and diabetes— diseases you can live with and not die from.". 

Susan Zager's insight:

Noreen Fraser is living with Stage IV metastatic breast cancer. She is the Founder and CEO of the Noreen Fraser Foundation, a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization dedicated to funding groundbreaking women's cancer research. Check out her web site at: http://www.noreenfraserfoundation.org/


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Keep A Breast Foundation: I ask that Komen commit at least 50% of total donations to medical research and innovation rather than to awareness and education. I request all other breast cancer non-p...

Keep A Breast Foundation: I ask that Komen commit at least 50% of total donations to medical research and innovation rather than to awareness and education.  I request all other breast cancer non-p... | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
My name is Ann Silberman.  I have metastatic breast cancer - the only type of breast cancer that kills.  Like 90 - 94%  of people now living with Stage IV breast cancer, I was diagnosed with early stage disease. Although this was the year 2009, I did the same type of treatment that has been around for 30 years:  slash, poison and burn.  After my mastectomy and chemotherapy, I’d hoped to go back to a long, healthy life.  Unfortunately, in 2011 breast cancer was found in my liver, and my disease is now incurable. The past four years have been a nightmare: chemo after chemo, surgeries and sepsis, radiation and sickness, scans and tests, hospitals and infusion rooms. Unlike most with a liver metastasis, I am lucky enough to still be alive 4 years later, although nobody can tell me for how long.  Metastatic breast cancer has always been, and still is, incurable.
Over the past 30 years, billions of dollars have been raised for the cause of breast cancer, with Komen being the most prominent non-profit involved. Every October, the US turns pink to support and raise funds to cure those with breast cancer. There isn't a large company in this country that doesn’t attach their name to a breast cancer charity. Most people who buy pink or run races believe that their money goes towards funding for a cure. They are misinformed.
What does it take to cure cancer? Research and Innovation. It takes MDs and PhDs, laboratories and science, creativity, new technology, experiments to find new medications and treatments. Unfortunately, the vast majority  of charitable funding goes towards the concept of “awareness.” And over the past generation, we have learned that being aware of cancer and discovering it early is no guarantee of safety; many women will end up with a metastasis no matter how early they found their cancer, even decades past their original diagnosis.
I ask you, in 2014, who is not aware of breast cancer? As a former school secretary, I can tell you that even children understand what breast cancer is. Women of today are not fearful of speaking to their doctors, and mammographic screening is widespread. Awareness might have been paramount in the 1970s when women didn't discuss their breasts, but it is no longer necessary. Breasts are out and proud and women control their healthcare. The goal of awareness has been achieved.  
Has all this focus on awareness helped cure cancer? The number of deaths from breast cancer has hovered in the 40,000  range for the past 20 years. 25% to 30% of women diagnosed early stage will still progress to the metastatic, fatal stage. Study after study has highlighted the limits of breast cancer screening. The latest study, which was published in the British Medical Journal , was a 25-year analysis that concluded screening didn't decrease the risk of dying from cancer
Scientists still do not understand fully the mechanism of metastasis, and how can one possibly cure cancer without funding to achieve this understanding? Finding breast cancer early is not a guarantee of safety. There are many gaps in our scientific understanding of this disease, and researchers and medical institutions are always in need of money, especially today. Government funding to the National Institutes of Health and other government agencies working on a cancer cure have been cut, and it is imperative that non-profits make up the difference. It is estimated that in the US, only 5%  of funding for metastatic cancer goes towards metastatic research. In today’s society, it is shameful that an organization like Susan G Komen “for the cure” only spends 18%  of their money on the one thing that has the potential cure breast cancer - and that is research.
Pink drill bits won’t cure cancer.  Football players in pink cleats won’t cure cancer.  Pink soup cans won’t cure breast cancer.  If these things cause donations to rise, than the money raised must go towards research - to cure cancer.    
I call on the Susan G.  Komen Foundation for the Cure to live up to the “for the cure” part of its name and to change their funding model.  I ask that Komen disclose exactly where their charitable donations are spent and commit at least 50% of total donations towards medical research.  I ask every breast cancer awareness charity to do the same. I ask the public to hold them accountable. My goal  was to live to see my son graduate from high school, and I am grateful that I was able to do that.  I have a new goal, and that is to live to see a cure.  I want my friends with metastatic cancer to live and raise their own children. It’s time to put down the pink flags, roll up the ribbons, and focus your dollars on research rather than awareness.  If you do this, you will be saving sisters, mothers, daughters and wives.   I will be speaking at SXSW 2015 along with Healthline  to encourage this change in the flow of funding, and will be tweeting with the hasttag #BCcure.  Please join me and let your voice be heard.
Susan Zager's insight:

You can go to the link and sign the petition at : https://www.change.org/p/keep-a-breast-foundation-i-ask-that-komen-commit-at-least-50-of-total-donations-to-medical-research-and-innovation-rather-than-to-awareness-and-education-i-request-all-other-breast-cancer-non-profits-do-the-same?recruiter=223002311&


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New model better predicts breast cancer risk in African American women

New model better predicts breast cancer risk in African American women | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
A breast cancer risk prediction model for African American women has been developed by scientists that found greater accuracy in predicting risk for the disease. The use of this model could result in increased eligibility of African Americans in breast cancer prevention trials.
Susan Zager's insight:

To see the study go to: http://jco.ascopubs.org/content/early/2015/01/23/JCO.2014.57.2750


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New breast exam nearly quadruples detection of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue

New breast exam nearly quadruples detection of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

For more information go to the study at: Molecular Breast Imaging (MBI) is a supplemental imaging technology designed to find tumors that would otherwise be obscured by surrounding dense breast tissue on a mammogram. The new breast imaging technique nearly quadruples detection rates of invasive breast cancers in women with dense breast tissue, according to the results of a major study.

Susan Zager's insight:

For more information go to: http://www.ajronline.org/doi/abs/10.2214/AJR.14.13357


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A Fascinating Year in Breast Cancer Advances

A Fascinating Year in Breast Cancer Advances | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

Some of the most important advances in breast cancer this year were related to all kinds of heterogeneity: within tumors, between tumors in a single patient, and between tumors in early and later stages, according to oncologists speaking at conferences, and contacted by Bioscience Technology.

“This year we had a lot of fascinating stories,” Jorge Reis-Filho told the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium in December. Reis-Filho is a cancer geneticist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Among the most important stories, he said, was the repeated confirmation, due to improving technology and massive genetics projects, that “heterogeneity is incredibly prevalent.”

Other areas of note, said oncologists, included findings that PALB2 is a strong germ-line proclivity gene; that drugs can be added to Herceptin to increase its potency; that ovarian suppression can work on some populations; and that long-term tamoxifen can prompt estrogen-induced apoptosis. 

PALB2

Daniel Hayes, a University of Michigan Cancer Center oncologist, told Bioscience Technology that one of the great papers of 2014 involved “identification of germ-line inherited mutations other than BRCA1 and 2 that increase susceptibility/risk for breast cancer.” The New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) paper, by Addenbrooke’s Hospital’s Marc Tischkowitz, found that patients with a mutation in the PALB2 gene stand a one in three chance of getting breast cancer by age 70. The gene interacts with the deadly BRCA1 and BRCA2, and has been called the potential “BRCA3.”

Susan Zager's insight:

For more information go to:

(1) http://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa1404037

(2) http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24525703

(3) http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v512/n7513/full/nature13600.html

(4) http://annonc.oxfordjournals.org/content/25/8/1544.full?sid=391b8ae3-97b6-46f6-903b-5c3475ddaa6a

(5) http://cancerres.aacrjournals.org/content/early/2014/10/10/0008-5472.CAN-14-1784





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Jose Rodrigues's curator insight, January 6, 9:45 PM
The World need and wait for this. Great and important ecencial advances in research and apllication of Know How.
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SABCS 2014: Immunotherapy Shows Early Promise for Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst

SABCS 2014: Immunotherapy Shows Early Promise for Triple-negative Breast Cancer Patients - CANCER RESEARCH Catalyst | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"After making great strides for some patients with melanoma and lung cancer, immunotherapy drugs are starting to offer hope for women with a very challenging form of breast cancer—triple-negative breast cancer.

Data presented Dec. 10 at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium showed that the PD-1 inhibitor pembrolizumab (Keytruda) was well tolerated by women with recurrent or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer and showed early signs of effectiveness. The PD-L1 inhibitor MPDL3280A was also found to be safe and tolerable for women with metastatic triple-negative breast cancer, with tumor shrinkage in some women.

Pembrolizumab Trial

This phase I, nonrandomized multicenter trial involved 32 patients from 29 to 72 years old who had heavily pretreated recurrent or metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. Patients received intravenous infusions of pembrolizumab every two weeks. Safety and tolerability of the drug—the standard endpoints of a phase I trial—were assessed, as well as antitumor activity."

Susan Zager's insight:

According to the article, "Triple-negative breast cancer is an area of active research,” says Nanda. “We are learning more about the different subtypes and are working hard to develop targeted approaches for patients with all forms of this disease. I would encourage patients with triple-negative breast cancer to consider enrolling in clinical trials if possible, so that together we can advance our understanding of these tumors and improve outcomes for women with this form of breast cancer.”

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SABCS 2014: Researchers present progression-free survival results from BOLERO-1 trial. ecancer - News

SABCS 2014: Researchers present progression-free survival results from BOLERO-1 trial. ecancer - News | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"Results from the final analysis of progression-free survival, response rate, and safety for the randomised, phase III Breast Cancer Trials of Oral Everolimus-1 (BOLERO-1) were presented at the 2014 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium.

“BOLERO-1 is a randomised, double-blind, phase III clinical trial evaluating whether the addition of everolimus, an mTOR inhibitor, to trastuzumab and paclitaxel improves progression- free survival for patients with HER2-positive, advanced breast cancer who have received no prior treatments for advanced disease,” said Sara A. Hurvitz, MD, an associate clinical professor of medicine and director of the Breast Oncology Program in the University of California, Los Angeles, Division of Haematology/Oncology.

“In San Antonio, we will be presenting data on progression-free survival for the overall patient population and in the subpopulation of patients with hormone receptor-negative disease,” continued Hurvitz. “We will also show our analysis of secondary endpoints of the study, including safety.”

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Triple Negative Breast Cancer impacts Mexican women

Triple Negative Breast Cancer impacts Mexican women | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it
Though Hispanic women typically have lower rates of breast cancer diagnosis compared to non-Hispanic white women, when it comes to triple-negative breast cancer, the situations are reversed. Not on...
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For more information go to:: http://www.scirp.org/journal/PaperInformation.aspx?PaperID=2632#.VHj0Xyc3vig


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Synthon Initiates Treatment of First Patients in Phase I Trial of anti-HER2 ADC SYD985 based on its Proprietary Linker-Drug Platform

Synthon Initiates Treatment of First Patients in Phase I Trial of anti-HER2 ADC SYD985 based on its Proprietary Linker-Drug Platform | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"The trial will include breast cancer patients with low expression of HER2

Synthon Biopharmaceuticals (‘Synthon’) today announced that the first patients with metastatic solid tumors have commenced treatment with its investigational anti-HER2 antibody-drug conjugate (ADC), SYD985.

First patients for this trial are being enrolled in leading European oncology centers Radboud University Medical Center (Nijmegen, the Netherlands), the Jules Bordet Institute (Brussels, Belgium) and the Institute of Cancer Research at The Royal Marsden Hospital (London, United Kingdom). The trial will recruit at least 76 patients and more centers are expected to join the trial in 2015.

This trial is a two part first-in-human Phase I study. In the dose escalation part of the trial, safety and efficacy of SYD985 will be evaluated in patients with locally advanced or metastatic solid tumors of any origin. In the expanded cohort part of the trial, only patients with breast and gastric cancer will be enrolled. The expanded cohorts will include patients currently indicated for HER2-targeted treatment as well as patients with HER2 2+ and HER2 1+ breast cancer for whom there currently is no effective anti-HER2 therapy available."

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This trial is registered in ClinicalTrials.gov with identifier NCT02277717. For more information go to: http://europepmc.org/abstract/med/25189543


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IRCM Jean-François Côté Molecular and Cellular Biology Axl

IRCM Jean-François Côté Molecular and Cellular Biology Axl | Breast Cancer News | Scoop.it

"Montreal, QC - A team of researchers at the IRCM, led by Jean-François Côté, have discovered a potential new therapeutic target to prevent the invasion of cancer cells, which could have a significant impact on breast cancer treatment. Their breakthrough was published online this week by the scientific journal Molecular and Cellular Biology.

The researchers are interested in understanding the molecular details involved in metastasis, which is the spread of cancer from one organ to another. This harmful process accounts for nearly 90 percent of cancer patient deaths.

"We investigated a molecule called Axl, which is detected at the surface of cancer cells and is known to be involved in various types of invasive cancer," said Dr. Côté, director of the Cytoskeletal Organization and Cell Migration research unit at the IRCM. "In fact, a high amount of Axl on breast tumours is closely associated with metastasis and a poor prognosis for patients. The molecule's mechanisms remain poorly understood, but we are now excited to have found how it works inside the cell."

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To see the study go to: http://mcb.asm.org/content/early/2014/10/14/MCB.00764-14.abstract


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