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Cancer Patients Need Anxiety, Depression Screening

Cancer Patients Need Anxiety, Depression Screening | Breast cancer | Scoop.it

"It is important to recognize and treat anxiety or depression among cancer patients, according to a clinical guideline published online April 14 in theJournal of Clinical Oncology...

 

"The panel recommends that all patients with cancer be evaluated for symptoms of depression and anxiety periodically throughout care. Validated, published measures and procedures should be used for assessments. Different treatment pathways are recommended depending on symptom level. The risk for poor quality of life and potential disease-related morbidity and mortality is increased by the failure to identify and treat anxiety and depression."


Via Cancer Commons
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Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:33 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Apr 22, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:33 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Apr 22, 2014

Cancer Commons's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:33 PM

Medical Xpress  |  Apr 22, 2014

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Preparing Our Patients for Survivorship With Prehab

Preparing Our Patients for Survivorship With Prehab | Breast cancer | Scoop.it
Debi Boyle explains the emerging discipline of prehab and how it may improve a cancer patient's quality of life.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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Deborah Fenlon's curator insight, February 23, 2014 9:05 AM

Prehab: we need some research in this area.

 

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Preparing Our Patients for Survivorship With Prehab

Preparing Our Patients for Survivorship With Prehab | Breast cancer | Scoop.it
Debi Boyle explains the emerging discipline of prehab and how it may improve a cancer patient's quality of life.

Via Marie Ennis-O'Connor
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Deborah Fenlon's curator insight, February 23, 2014 9:05 AM

Prehab: we need some research in this area.

 

Rescooped by Erin Murphy from Cancer Research You can Trust
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World Cancer Day: Half don't know about link between diet and cancer

World Cancer Day: Half don't know about link between diet and cancer | Breast cancer | Scoop.it
Around half of Britons don't recognise the importance of diet in protecting against cancer, demonstrating that many of the myths about the disease are still widely believed.

Via Heather Swift
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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, February 6, 2014 12:18 PM

So much work to be done and it must start with looking for the missing piece...are Britons without access to education around nutritional impact on health?  Are they aware but not clear on how to make healthy eating choices?  Time for a close look at what the obstacles are and then address them.  Education is not enough...it must translate into action and sustainable change.

Rescooped by Erin Murphy from eHealth - Social Business in Health
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A 3-stage model of patient-centered communication for addressing cancer patients’ emotional distress

A 3-stage model of patient-centered communication for addressing cancer patients’ emotional distress | Breast cancer | Scoop.it

Results

A three-stage, conceptual model for assisting clinicians to more effectively address the challenges of recognizing, exploring, and managing cancer patients’ emotional distress in the clinical encounter was developed. To enhance and enact recognition of patients’ emotions, clinicians can engage in mindfulness, self-situational awareness, active listening, and facilitative communication. To enact exploration, clinicians can acknowledge and validate emotions and provide empathy. Finally, clinicians can provide information empathetically, identify therapeutic resources, and give referrals and interventions as needed to help lessen patients’ emotional distress.

Conclusion

This model serves as a framework for future research examining pathways that link clinicians’ emotional cue recognition to patient-centered responses exploring a patient's emotional distress to therapeutic actions that contribute to improved psychological and emotional health.

Practical implications

Specific communicative and cognitive strategies are presented that can help clinicians better recognize a patient's emotional distress and respond in ways that have therapeutic value.


Via rob halkes
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rob halkes's curator insight, January 23, 2014 10:54 AM

Guideline for physicians, great!

(just a pity that the full publication needs to be heavily paid..)

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Exercise Cuts Breast Cancer Risk For All Women Everywhere

Exercise Cuts Breast Cancer Risk For All Women Everywhere | Breast cancer | Scoop.it

"This could be the simplest bit of health advice ever: Exercise reduces women's risk of breast cancer, no matter what kind of exercise they do, how old they are, how much they weigh, or when they get started.

Researchers in France looked at studies that involved more than 4 million women around the world who participated in prospective studies from 1987 to 2013. They found that the more active a woman is, the better her odds of avoiding breast cancer. Women who were most active, with more than an hour a day of vigorous activity, got the most benefits, lowering their cancer risk by 12 percent.

But women weren't as active saw reduced risk, too, notes Mathieu Boniol, research director at the Strathclyde Institute for Global Public Health in Lyon, France. More activity was better, but anything was better than nothing. He presented the data Thursday at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow.

"This decrease is the same whatever the country, whatever the age, whatever the menopausal status," Boniol told Shots. And it didn't matter if women were active in work, activities of daily living, or sports. "It's very good news."

 

 


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 20, 2014 6:32 PM

To see the study go to: http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/15/1/57.long


Stefanie Charles's curator insight, August 11, 2014 12:11 PM

Published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR)

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The Breast Cancer Racial Gap - NYTimes.com

The Breast Cancer Racial Gap - NYTimes.com | Breast cancer | Scoop.it

"A troubling racial divide in breast cancer mortality continues to widen in most major cities around the country, suggesting that advances in diagnosis and treatment continue to bypass African-American women, according to new research.

An analysis of breast cancer mortality trends in 41 of the largest cities in the United States shows that the chance of surviving breast cancer correlates strongly with the color of a woman’s skin. Black women with breast cancer — whether they hail from Phoenix or Denver, Boston or Wichita, Kan. — are on average about 40 percent more likely to die of the disease than white women with breast cancer.

In some cities, the risk is even greater. In Los Angeles, a black woman with breast cancer is about 70 percent more likely to die from the disease than a white woman is. In Memphis, black women face more than double the risk, according to the research, published on Tuesday in Cancer Epidemiology.

The findings were compiled and analyzed by the Sinai Urban Health Institute in Chicago and the Avon Foundation for Women, which also funded the research. The analysis builds on a series of studies that have identified a startling racial gap in breast cancer mortality.

In 2012, a widely publicized study of the 24 largest cities examined the racial gap in breast cancer from 2005 through 2007. The new study takes a longer view and includes breast cancer deaths from 1990 through 2009 in 41 cities.

The more comprehensive analysis shows that in most cities 20 years ago, black and white women faced about the same mortality risk from breast cancer. But starting in 1990, the death rate among white women began to drop rapidly in many cities while death rates among black women fell only a little.

“It’s absolutely startling and very dismal, because there is hardly any health measure in the United States that hasn’t improved in the last 20 years,” said Steve Whitman, director of Sinai Urban Health Institute and the study’s senior author.


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, March 4, 2014 9:14 PM

The findings in this article published Tuesday in Cancer Epidemiology are very upsetting. There are much higher death rates of black than white women with metastatic breast cancer in 41 cities in the US. 

"In Los Angeles, a black woman with breast cancer is about 70 percent more likely to die from the disease than a white woman is. In Memphis, black women face more than double the risk."

"The findings were compiled and analyzed by the Sinai Urban Health Institute in Chicago and the Avon Foundation for Women, which also funded the research."

"The more comprehensive analysis shows that in most cities 20 years ago, black and white women faced about the same mortality risk from breast cancer. But starting in 1990, the death rate among white women began to drop rapidly in many cities while death rates among black women fell only a little."

"The research also dispels the notion that black women face a higher risk of breast cancer because of genetic differences. While they are at greater risk for some types of breast cancers, that doesn’t explain the widening mortality gap developing in a relatively short period of just two decades.

“Mathematically, it can’t be anything genetic,” Dr. Whitman said. “How could genes change in 20 years?”

The study also found the racial gap in New York City, being the largest city had "nominal disparity." While no disparity is acceptable,  the people involved in the studies noted that New York City is doing something right. 


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Breast Cancer Revelation: Other Hormone Receptors Could be Targeted for Novel Therapies

Breast Cancer Revelation: Other Hormone Receptors Could be Targeted for Novel Therapies | Breast cancer | Scoop.it

"Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among U.S. women, and is the second leading cause of death among females. With one in eight women affected by breast cancer in their lifetime, researchers are scrambling to seek new diagnostic strategies and therapies to combat the disease and improve patient outcome.

A brand new study, performed by researchers from Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) and the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, has established that additional hormone receptors could be targeted to bolster existing treatment methods. In hormone-dependent breast cancer, current treatments focus on using medications that are capable of blocking estrogen from binding to intracellular estrogen receptors, situated inside the tumor cells; in turn, this prevents cancer cells from continuing to multiply and reduces the chance of their metastatic dissemination throughout the body.

First study author Sandro Santagata, of BWH Department of Pathology, and senior study author Tan A. Ince, of the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, have now concluded that androgen and vitamin D receptors can, likewise, be sources of target. The latest findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation, in a paper entitled Taxonomy of Breast Cancer Based on Normal Cell Phenotype Predicts Outcome."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, February 7, 2014 11:54 AM

To see the abstract "Androgen receptor as a targeted therapy for breast cancer" go to: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3410582/#!po=30.6452

To se the abstract "Vitamin D, Calcium, and Breast Cancer" go to: http://cebp.aacrjournals.org/content/15/8/1427.full


To see the abstract," Taxonomy of breast cancer based on normal cell phenotype predicts outcome" go to: http://www.jci.org/articles/view/70941



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Engineered virus is effective against triple negative breast cancer cells

Engineered virus is effective against triple negative breast cancer cells | Breast cancer | Scoop.it

"Scientists have discovered a potential cure for one of the most aggressive and least treatable forms of breast cancer called "triple negative breast cancer." In laboratory experiments involving human cancer cells, scientists used a virus similar to the one that helped eradicate smallpox to coax cancer cells to produce a protein which makes them susceptible to radioactive iodine. This discovery was published in the February 2014 issue of The FASEB Journal. Please note that human clinical trials are necessary before any definitive claims of a cure can be made and treatments can be made available.

"We hope that the recent advances in virology, genetic engineering and targeted radiotherapy will soon translate into an entire class of novel oncolytic, virotherapies for the treatment of deadly cancers," said Yuman Fong, M.D., a researcher involved in the work from the Department of Surgery at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in New York, NY.

To make this discovery, Fong and colleagues successfully infected and killed TNBC cells using a vaccinia virus. In addition, the researchers were also able to use the virus to cause infected cancer cells produce a cell surface protein called hNIS that normally is used to concentrate iodine in thyroid cells. The hNIS protein, expressed in thyroid cancer, is why most thyroid cancers can be cured or successfully treated with a small dose of radioactive iodine (which kills thyroid cancer cells expressing hNIS). Armed with the ability to force TNBC cells to produce this protein, researchers now have a way to deliver anticancer therapies to this deadly and resistant form of cancer."


Via Susan Zager
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Susan Zager's curator insight, January 30, 2014 3:31 PM

Even though this is not in human trials yet, it is a great discovery. Dr. Yuman Fong and his associates at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center sucessfully infected and killed TNBC cells using a vaccine. According to Gerald Weissmann, M.D., "This is an important and significant discovery that basically combines proven cures for two other diseases. Even more exciting is that the effects of this virus and radioactive iodine are well known in people, hopefully reducing the amount of time it will take for it to reach the clinic."

To see the abstract go to: http://www.fasebj.org/content/28/2/676.abstract