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Rescooped by BRANDON HANCOCK from Use of steroids in professional sports
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Stephan Bonnar took steroids to prepare for pro wrestling – UFC ...

Stephan Bonnar took steroids to prepare for pro wrestling – UFC ... | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it

Stephan Bonnar took steroids to prepare for pro wrestling – UFC News Former light heavyweight contender of the Ultimate Fighting Championship Steph.


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Bielema had beef with Buckeyes' recruiting tactics

Bielema had beef with Buckeyes' recruiting tactics | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it
University of Wisconsin football coach Bret Bielema accused new Ohio State coach Urban Meyer of illegal recruiting tactics and said...

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Rescooped by BRANDON HANCOCK from Energy Efficiency News and Reviews
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Conservatives Wrongly Blame Super Bowl Blackout On Energy Efficiency Measures

Conservatives Wrongly Blame Super Bowl Blackout On Energy Efficiency Measures | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it

the Drudge Report and others are suggesting that energy efficiency efforts somehow caused the power outage that occurred during the Super Bowl. But these attempts to scapegoat green energy are wrongheaded -- the outage occurred within the stadium, not among the energy efficient lighting outside the stadium. 


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FEATURE: Rioting fans throw stadium security into focus - Taipei Times

FEATURE: Rioting fans throw stadium security into focus - Taipei Times | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it
FEATURE: Rioting fans throw stadium security into focusTaipei TimesWith police and politicians calling for action against rioting hooligans and a new security proposal proving controversial, violence at Germany's soccer grounds has again hit the...

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Becky Kelly's curator insight, August 22, 2013 8:25 PM

Securityissue at stadium

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Taxpayer-backed sports stadiums are a $31 billion rip-off - Mike Kroll

Taxpayer-backed sports stadiums are a $31 billion rip-off - Mike Kroll | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it
Presented by Citizens for Tax Justice. Citizens for Tax Justice. We've known for a while that government subsidies and tax breaks for sports stadiums are a raw deal for taxpayers. But a new book by Harvard University urban ...

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Erika Scott's comment, March 21, 2013 10:05 PM
I wish I had found this article earlier. It touches on some key points on why public subsidies are not beneficial to the community. Also, it mentions how some companies do not take all factors into consideration when they assess subsidy effects on a community.
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Shocker: Taxpayers May Have To Bail Out Vikings Stadium Building Plan

Shocker: Taxpayers May Have To Bail Out Vikings Stadium Building Plan | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it

Subsidies for professional sports venues has to be one of the most ludicrous things in politics. Professional sports are hugely profitable enterprises, where the teams are owned by billionaires and staffed with millionaires,.......

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Erika Scott's comment, March 24, 2013 7:54 AM
This article mentions how a "scheme" to fund the Vikings' stadium fell through and now the Minnesota taxpayers will have to "bail out" the stadium. It is interesting because the scheme that fell through is one that was not mentioned in our textbook.
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AAU Basketball Corruption and Illegal Recruiting

AAU Basketball Corruption and Illegal Recruiting | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it
Think recruiting in college sports begins in high school? Think again. Middle school talent is now the concentration for recruiters at some top tier universities...

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Rescooped by BRANDON HANCOCK from Inspiring Sustainable Sport
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A Big Green Stadium (Renovation) For The 2014 World Cup ...

A Big Green Stadium (Renovation) For The 2014 World Cup ... | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it
We've brought you a few big green stadiums in connection with the London Olympics, and a few from the NFL as well. The World Cup however, happens every four years — and as far as the world at large, football is soccer.

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Rescooped by BRANDON HANCOCK from Sports Facility Management 4172285
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Why All Eyes Are On March Madness Sports Arenas and Stadiums

Why All Eyes Are On March Madness Sports Arenas and Stadiums | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it
This article will takes a look at why sports arena maintenance is more visible now after the Super Bowl power outage especially as March Madness begins.

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Should Sports Arenas Buy Back Tickets That Fans Don’t Want? | TIME.com

Should Sports Arenas Buy Back Tickets That Fans Don’t Want? | TIME.com | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it
Given the number of empty seats on display during the typical pro sports event, arenas seem to be having a pretty tough time selling tickets.

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sabrina martin's curator insight, March 24, 2013 11:03 AM

This is a a good article to look at the ticket selling problem and give your facility a chance to evalute the sistuation and create a plan.

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Should Sports Teams Receive Tax Breaks?

Should Sports Teams Receive Tax Breaks? | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it
Here are some of the costs, pros and cons of sports teams receiving tax breaks. 

 

In a very general sense, the question of tax breaks for sports teams falls under the category of whether or not subsidies are desirable. From an economic perspective on subsidies, some could say that almost all of them create suboptimal outcomes. This is because under normal market conditions market forces move automatically towards allocative efficiency. Subsidies distort the ability of markets to correctly allocate resources because they provide an incentive to continue the subsidized behavior, even when it is not profitable or productive to do so.

 

Why Subsidies Are Useful
The counterargument is that subsidies are useful for this very reason. They allow government to shape economic outcomes toward desired policy objectives. For example, the money used to fund alternative energy sources. So although the subsidy is creating a less than optimal use of resources, people believe that is balanced by the development of technology that might not have otherwise been built until much later, if at all. Another reason people champion subsidies is to protect jobs or create growth. However, the job market is subject to the same economic forces as any other. By creating subsidies in unproductive industries people remain in jobs that are also unproductive; this makes society worse off. In the case of sports teams, the most commonly cited reason for subsidies is that it creates jobs and improves revenues. Yet there have been studies that conclude that this is not always the case.

 

Not All Need Tax Breaks
Most sports teams are actually quite profitable and do not actually require tax breaks to remain competitive. Examples of the types of subsidies sports teams regularly enjoy include: tax-deductible ticket sales (including on luxury suites), reduction of taxes on revenue via direct tax credits and sweet-heart deals on new facilities. What this means is that corporations, and even individuals, can deduct a portion of what they spend on tickets in a similar manner as donating to a charity. In the case of new stadiums, the burden of building and operating arenas gets pushed onto the taxpayer while owners reap the related revenues. Unfortunately, due to the secretive nature of professional teams, most financial information is inaccessible thus preventing the public from accurately gauging the level of financial support these franchises receive.

 

However, let us be fair and consider the case where sports teams are legitimately struggling and only government aid can keep them afloat. This hearkens back to the beginning of this piece and the discussion on whether or not it is believed that subsidies are useful. Insofar as civic pride is concerned, maybe it is considered appropriate to prop up a flailing team. People have an emotional connection to their sports teams. They buy tickets to games, purchase merchandise and follow every story about their chosen champions. Despite this, only a very small portion of the population (20%) thinks that tax breaks for sports teams is good policy.

 

The intuition for this is that if a sports team is failing it is because it is poorly run and is spending itself into a hole, or the fans do not support it with enough revenue to continue. Either way, this is not an enterprise that should be having public money thrown at it. Perhaps the largest segment of government support goes toward the construction of stadiums. Fancy new stadiums attract fans and sports teams alike.

 

Cities often will use the promise of a new stadium to entice teams to relocate. Is this a good investment on behalf of the public? Almost all economists and independent development specialists conclude that the rate of return on these projects is less than what could be had on alternative projects, with some sports contracts failing significantly. Further, those cities that invested heavily in sports stadiums have experienced, on average, slower income growth compared to their peers who chose otherwise.

 

The Bottom Line
There is no silver lining. The public does not support deluxe treatments for sports teams in the form of tax breaks, the data does not support tax breaks for sports teams and commonly accepted economic theory does not support tax breaks for sports teams either. This leaves fans and citizens paying double as both their taxes and discretionary income go towards profitable franchises instead of schools and roads. The only people who benefit from such activity are those who own, operate and work for sports franchises. As Norman Braman, former owner of the NFL's Philadelphia Eagles, put it: "the taxpayers are a bunch of suckers."


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Versatile sports facility to serve multi-purpose - Daily Commercial News

Versatile sports facility to serve multi-purpose - Daily Commercial News | Brandon's Sports Facility Management | Scoop.it
Daily Commercial News
Versatile sports facility to serve multi-purpose
Daily Commercial News
But the Sportsplex won't just be an elaborate gym.

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