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Brand Stories
Brand Building Through Storytelling
Curated by Omar Kattan
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Rescooped by Omar Kattan from Just Story It! Biz Storytelling
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The Power of Storytelling; What Marketers Can Learn From Casey Neistat and Google

The Power of Storytelling; What Marketers Can Learn From Casey Neistat and Google | Brand Stories | Scoop.it

And, last Saturday morning, before I got up and on with my day, I watched his short film entitled ‘Guthrie Beach Raft’ and it got me thinking about the power of storytelling in marketing.

 

Yes, successful marketing is all about emotions -- not facts.

 

There are two videos to view here that make the author's point. The first video is OK -- for whatever reason it didn't really grab me.

 

But the second video about Google Chrome is a hit! That's because it tells a very engaging story about how someone uses Google's integrated suite of tools. It's brilliant.

 

Enjoy both of these -- and take these lessons to heart. When creating your content, decide which emotions you want to evoke in your audience and then craft your material to evoke those. 

 

As the author says, "Sometimes, facts and figures are great, but if you’re really looking to create loyalty and build a relationship with your audience then creating an emotional bond is the way forward."


Via Karen Dietz
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Storytelling sounds like a great idea, but how do I make it work for my brand?

Storytelling sounds like a great idea, but how do I make it work for my brand? | Brand Stories | Scoop.it

If you enter the phrase “storytelling as a marketing tool” into Google search, you will get 1,650,000 results. Obviously a lot of people are talking about the value of storytelling in building awareness and trust for your marketing message.

 

Well, the title is an excellent question. And the author has the right idea in the solution he offers. But then everything goes haywire.

 

Yes, a case study is one way to tell your brand story. And the author makes good points about why. Yet the key elements he identifies for a case study will most likey generate text that is dry as desert sand. You'll get a half-baked promo and not a story.

 

So what do you do? Check out this article: http://terribleminds.com/ramble/2012/05/08/25-things-writers-should-know-about-creating-mystery/ I didn't curate this piece because the translation from this post for writers to the business world would have taken a long time.  

 

However, pay attention to at least these points (the others are great too):

#3 -- the case study elements in this post will read more like a news piece. Avoid this at all costs.

#4 -- the audience wants to work. Effective storytelling is about connection and engagement. People want to work for the story. Follow the advice here.

#9 -- Sue Spence & the Mystery Squad. Create suspense & mystery (yes! even in your biz stories this is critical). It is not hard.

#14 -- have a plot and a character

 

OK -- there are more insights in the second article. Not all the points in this second article apply to business storytelling, but they sure will get you a lot further along than the original advice about how to build a case study. And you'll have a lot more fun in the process!


Via Karen Dietz
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Storytelling Reconsidered

Storytelling Reconsidered | Brand Stories | Scoop.it
As you may already know, storytelling can be a powerful tool in any marketer’s repertoire. Crafting and telling engaging stories is an important skill to develop.

 

“If you know what story your customers live in, you can sell to them with ease.

… there is one thing I know for certain: You want to make your story BETTER.

Stories run deep. If you want to change the story you’ve been in to the story you want to be in, it’s best to just assume it’s going to take everything you’ve got. If there’s a resource that is capable of improving your story, you should avail yourself of it.”

 

I really like this article because of the solid advice it gives about how to frame and orient your business stories. For example, it's all about THEM and not you! And work with an org story professional to make sure you've got the stories well crafted (even I do this). Plus, if you are not happy with the story that defines you, then change it!

 

There are the points about Eucatastrophe and and lessons from Captain America. Fun, imagintative, and great points/reminders for us all!


Via Karen Dietz
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When Is A Story Not A Story?

When Is A Story Not A Story? | Brand Stories | Scoop.it

The presenter correctly indicated that stories can be used to hold interest that might otherwise drift. He supported this by outlining a structure:

Start with the point you want to make; Illustrate the point with a story; Provide an example or application that supports your point.

Ugh!! I can't stand this flow because it is simply a regurgitation of the old "Tell them what you are going to tell them; tell them; then tell you what you told them." I agree with the author of the article who says this is not storytelling. The author continues to say:

 

A side benefit, he contended, is that this structure can be quickly delivered.

 

It sounds logical, but it is not storytelling. Speeding through events with an eye on the clock cuts the heart out of emotional involvement, and effective storytelling ties directly into the emotions of the audience.

 

Now, this structure can certainly work when the second step is changed to “Illustrate the point with an anecdote.”

 

I love this article because it is a terrific discussion about the difference between an anecdote and a story -- and when/how to use each effectively. The author makes great points and I know you will get a lot from reading this post.

 

And if you want more examples of different narrative forms so you can be a smarter storyteller, then go download my free guide "Narrative Forms -- What the Heck is a Story Anyway? Why Can't I Just Use An Example?" 

http://www.juststoryit.com/howto and scroll down to #2 on the page.


Via Gregg Morris, Karen Dietz
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