Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism
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Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism
As a graduate student at the UNT Mayborn School of Journalism, I decided to complete my final project through Scoop in a research paper/social media hybrid for my strategic social media class.
Curated by Sara Ortega
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Brand journalism – what is it, who can do it and what's the value to ...

Brand journalism – what is it, who can do it and what's the value to ... | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it
reporters notebook and pen The rise of brand journalism is a digital marketing job trend we've been monitoring at Firehead recruitment in the past year. In this short blog series, we look at brand journalism, what a brand ...
Sara Ortega's insight:

Brand journalism is a form of marketing that applies the skills, approach and mindset of journalism to corporate content.  This can significantly impact how corporations tell their stories and what stories they tell. 

 

Jesse Noyes made the transition from business reporter for the Boston Herald and Boston Business Journal to become the managing editor of Eloqua, a marketing firm.  He describes his role as a corporate reporter as drilling down within the company and industry to find stories that often go untold.  His bosses value the thousands of new followers to their blog as well as doubling the unique visitors.  

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Coca-Cola digital chief: 'Kill the press release'

Coca-Cola digital chief: 'Kill the press release' | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it
By 2015, the press release will be a thing of the past at Coke, thanks to its new brand journalism website, which replaced its home page. (Kill the press release - Coca-Cola takes #Brand journalism to a new level.
Sara Ortega's insight:

1. Leverage your current website.

2. Build a newsroom, kill the press release.

3. Fill your 'careers' section with stories.

4. Touch their hearts.

5. Use infographics.

6. Design for smartphones.

7. Use data to guide your editorial decisions.


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2014 will be the year of brand journalism

2014 will be the year of brand journalism | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it

This is what leads me to conclude that 2014 will be the year of brand journalism....

 

As content marketers struggle to keep up with the demands of creating content all the time that’s high quality, increasingly they’ll look to professionals who can maintain that pace without breaking a sweat – journalists.

 

Brands are also realizing that they must capture their audiences’ attention, that they must take responsibility for the creation and maintenance of those audiences. Relying on the traditional media to do so at a time when traditional media is declining is folly at best....


Via Jeff Domansky
Sara Ortega's insight:

As newsrooms continue to cut staff, major journalists are leaving news for corporations like NYT tech columnist David Pogue for Yahoo.

 

So what does this mean for corporations?

 

-You are a media company and a publisher.  If you’re looking to start branded journalism make sure it to do it right.

-Get comfortable with the tools of a publisher.  Use focus groups to text out tools and platforms.

-Consider hiring actual journalists or freelancers to develop great content.  

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, November 14, 2013 9:23 AM

No surprise as brand journalism momentum grows.

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How to showcase your brand journalism site

How to showcase your brand journalism site | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it
Should your brand journalism site live on your corporate site, or be a separate news site? Here are the benefits of and the strategy behind both locations.

Via Jeff Domansky
Sara Ortega's insight:

One of main reasons to house a brand journalism site separate from a corporate site is that the content should never look like marketing.  While there is the option to build a page on corporate websites that showcases news, there are better ways of creating an external, news only site and promoting through other channels.  Businesses can create an email newsletter that culls content from the brand journalism site.  There are also social media channels that push the content to readers like Twitter, Facebook or Pinterest.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, July 16, 2013 11:42 PM

Good interview and online newsroom tips from Mark Ragan and Jim Ylisela.

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Three types of brand journalism (with examples) | Firehead

Three types of brand journalism (with examples) | Firehead | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it
What does brand journalism look like in practice? In the third post in our brand journalism series, we look at a selection of examples to see the breadth of brand journalism in this emerging digital comms specialism.
Sara Ortega's insight:

Brand journalism produced in-house or via an agency

-Eloqua, a marketing firm, and ‘It’s all about the revenue’ blog provided customers with news articles, blog posts, cases studies, interviews and other useful tools.  By doing so they established themselves as thought leaders in marketing.

 

Brand journalism sites that target a specific buyer persona

-HSBC uses their site “Business without Borders” to target their audience that they want to encourage to grow business internationally.  The HSBC logo appears on every edition but they vary by region and have content focused on readers rather than the brand. 

 

Brand journalism sites that create (and report) the news

-Red Bull has become the leader of creating and reporting the news.  Most recently they sponsored Felix Baumgartner’s jump from space and set up a rolling news site with multiple reporting platforms.  

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R. Michael Brown Interview on Brand Journalism and More ...

R. Michael Brown Interview on Brand Journalism and More ... | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it
R. Michael Brown interviewed by Dennis Washington of Cross Digital on Brand Journalism, Native Advertising, how to set up an online newsroom, and more. Subjects Covered: Brand Journalism Content Marketing ...
Sara Ortega's insight:

Michael Brown is a  consultant, speaker, and writer at Brown Ltd. Digital Marketing & PR.  His experience with brand journalism began in the 1980s by storytelling for technology companies.  'In the last five years, brand journalism has been exploding as traditional media has been imploding.  They are no longer the content gatekeepers."

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Brand Journalism: Ethics, Opportunities & Outcomes | Beyond PR

Brand Journalism: Ethics, Opportunities & Outcomes | Beyond PR | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it

Brand Journalism: Ethics, Opportunities & Outcomes | Beyond PR
http://safe.mn/2V7Q


Via Steve Momorella
Sara Ortega's insight:

There may always be a debate between public relations professionals and journalists.  This arguments of ethics seems to arise during the discussion of the ethics of brand journalism?  Can brands really be trusts to tell their stories truthfully?  In a 2011 SXSW panel on the topic, which included journalists and PR people alike, concluded that not only can brands be trusted, but it’s in their best interests to be their own voice on the tough topics.  And, Social networks will out untruths and punish brands that cheat.

 

Ford is an example of a corporation who weathered the storm by provability visibility into tough conversations and used a variety of media to communicate to audiences with a real language and real people.  Through these efforts they received a lot of attention from professional media.   

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Seven Ways to Produce Killer Brand Journalism

Seven Ways to Produce Killer Brand Journalism | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it
Is “brand journalism” an oxymoron? Some think so. The line between a barely veiled PR or marketing message and material that’s truly valuable can be very thin.

Via Thomas Faltin
Sara Ortega's insight:

What does quality brand journalism look like?

 

-More journalism, less brand.

 

-Start small.

 

-Make it a part of a brand communications strategy.

 

-Source your material.

 

-Study the experts.

 

-Slow down.

 

-Find the real story. 

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5 tips for personal branding on National Freelancers Day - Journalism.co.uk

5 tips for personal branding on National Freelancers Day - Journalism.co.uk | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it
Journalism.co.uk 5 tips for personal branding on National Freelancers Day Journalism.co.uk Some may be more appropriate than others – a fashion journalist will have more to share on Pinterest or Instagram than a political blogger, for example – but...
Sara Ortega's insight:

-Brand yourself online—be consistent across all platforms

 

-Brand yourself offline—make sure all of your business cards have relevant information and are consistent with you online brand, make sure your personality also reflects your brand

 

-Find a niche—find an area or areas you enjoy and become the expert in it

 

-Don’t rule yourself out—keep a site that also showcases a broad skillset as a journalist with qualifications, trainings, examples of work, testimonials and picture.


-Be consistent—maintain your presence across all of your social platforms. 

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How McDonald's invented brand journalism, and how brand journalism saved McDonald's

How McDonald's invented brand journalism, and how brand journalism saved McDonald's | Final Project #4270: Brand Journalism | Scoop.it

In 2003 McDonald’s was a global corporation in decline.

 

A brand that had built it’s reputation on the simple slogan that it was a happy place to be; which had democratised eating out, had forgotten what it was about.

 

Its restaurants were scruffy and tired. Its staff poorly trained and demoralised, its food produced with an eye to economy, not quality. That food had become anachronistic at a time when consciousness about good diet and health were growing rapidly. What was worse, its senior management didn’t see a problem.

 

In a BusinessWeek article (1), Michael Quinlan, then chairman and CEO, said, “Do we have to change? No, we don’t have to change. We have the most successful brand in the world”.

 

As sales in each restaurant fell, McDonald’s responded not by improving those restaurants, and what it sold in them, but by opening more and more new ones.

 

When regular evaluations showed the brand experience was declining, McDonald’s dropped the evaluations.

 

Instead of making the brand better, it just made it bigger.

 

In March 2003, BusinessWeek wrote about these problems, under the headline ‘Hamburger Hell’. There were plenty more reports like it. As Larry Light, then McDonald's chief marketing officer,  recalls in his book Six Rules for Brand Revitalisation (2): “Article after article described the unfortunate conditions of McDonald’s. Reporters, analysts, observers, activists, franchisees, employees, marketing consultants, everyone had something negative to say: McDonald’s was ‘out of date’; ‘too large to be turned around’; ‘its time is passed’.”

 

And yet.

 

A year later everything had changed.

 

When Larry Light spoke at an Economist conference in 2004 he was able to quote headlines such as: “‘The Sizzle is Back’; ‘Eye Popping Performance’; and ‘McDonald’s Leaves Analysts Upbeat on Prospects’. And after another year, McDonald’s was being described as an incredible turnaround business case.”

 

What had happened in the meantime?

 

Light had initiated a transformation of the company. Just about everything had changed – from staff training to restaurant refurbishment; the food that was sold and the way McDonald’s was advertised and marketed. That marketing now followed what Light said was something very new: a brand journalism approach.


Via Andy Bull
Sara Ortega's insight:

I included this book as a reference text and one of the only books out there written solely about brand journalism.  

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