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The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself

The Brain: How The Brain Rewires Itself | brainstorms | Scoop.it

The adult brain retains impressive powers of "neuroplasticity"--the ability to change its structure and function in response to experience. These aren't minor tweaks either. Something as basic as the function of the visual or auditory cortex can change as a result of a person's experience of becoming deaf or blind at a young age. Even when the brain suffers a trauma late in life, it can rezone itself like a city in a frenzy of urban renewal. If a stroke knocks out, say, the neighborhood of motor cortex that moves the right arm, a new technique called constraint-induced movement therapy can coax next-door regions to take over the function of the damaged area. The brain can be rewired.

The first discoveries of neuroplasticity came from studies of how changes in the messages the brain receives through the senses can alter its structure and function. When no transmissions arrive from the eyes in someone who has been blind from a young age, for instance, the visual cortex can learn to hear or feel or even support verbal memory. When signals from the skin or muscles bombard the motor cortex or the somatosensory cortex (which processes touch), the brain expands the area that is wired to move, say, the fingers. In this sense, the very structure of our brain--the relative size of different regions, the strength of connections between them, even their functions--reflects the lives we have led. Like sand on a beach, the brain bears the footprints of the decisions we have made, the skills we have learned, the actions we have taken.

 

As scientists probe the limits of neuroplasticity, they are finding that mind sculpting can occur even without input from the outside world. The brain can change as a result of the thoughts we think. This has important implications for health: something as seemingly insubstantial as a thought can affect the very stuff of the brain, altering neuronal connections in a way that can treat mental illness or, perhaps, lead to a greater capacity for empathy and compassion. It may even dial up the supposedly immovable happiness set point.

 

 


Via Pamir Kiciman
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Pamir Kiciman's comment, June 14, 2013 7:02 AM
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Jolanda Gerbecks's curator insight, December 19, 2013 4:44 PM

Hellup, altijd gelukkig, is dat nu zo fijn?

Is het niet juist die enkele down periode, waarna het licht des te sterker gaat schijnen en dat alles weer mogelijk maakt?

 

Rond deze tijd van het jaar, als de dagen weer langer worden doet de natuur het ook.

 

Dus laat jezelf ook eens depri zijn, dan is het geluk daarna weer extra fijn.

 

Dat we onze hersenen vormen met onze gedachten lijkt me nogal wiedes, dat doen de woorden hier en al onze daden in 3d immers ook. Zo boven zo beneden, zo binnen zo buiten ;-)

 

Feit is, onze hersenen dragen werkelijk de voetstappen van onze beslissingen in ons brein.

Je verleden ligt immers in al je lichaamscellen op verschillende wijze opgeborgen.

 

Geluk hierbij is dat je altijd vrij bent om opnieuw te kiezen en je eerdere mentale voetstappen uit te wissen, enkel en alleen door een ander gedachtenpad af te wandelen.

 

Dat is "The road less travelled".

Jolanda Gerbecks's curator insight, August 17, 2014 6:12 AM

The adult brain retains impressive powers of "neuroplasticity"--the ability to change its structure and function in response to experience. These aren't minor tweaks either. Something as basic as the function of the visual or auditory cortex can change as a result of a person's experience of becoming deaf or blind at a young age. Even when the brain suffers a trauma late in life, it can rezone itself like a city in a frenzy of urban renewal. If a stroke knocks out, say, the neighborhood of motor cortex that moves the right arm, a new technique called constraint-induced movement therapy can coax next-door regions to take over the function of the damaged area. The brain can be rewired.

The first discoveries of neuroplasticity came from studies of how changes in the messages the brain receives through the senses can alter its structure and function. When no transmissions arrive from the eyes in someone who has been blind from a young age, for instance, the visual cortex can learn to hear or feel or even support verbal memory. When signals from the skin or muscles bombard the motor cortex or the somatosensory cortex (which processes touch), the brain expands the area that is wired to move, say, the fingers. In this sense, the very structure of our brain--the relative size of different regions, the strength of connections between them, even their functions--reflects the lives we have led. Like sand on a beach, the brain bears the footprints of the decisions we have made, the skills we have learned, the actions we have taken.

 

As scientists probe the limits of neuroplasticity, they are finding that mind sculpting can occur even without input from the outside world. The brain can change as a result of the thoughts we think. This has important implications for health: something as seemingly insubstantial as a thought can affect the very stuff of the brain, altering neuronal connections in a way that can treat mental illness or, perhaps, lead to a greater capacity for empathy and compassion. It may even dial up the supposedly immovable happiness set point.

 

 

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The 5 Best Holiday Gift Ideas For Seniors

The 5 Best Holiday Gift Ideas For Seniors | brainstorms | Scoop.it
The best holiday gifts for seniors allow them greater quality of life. Presents for older loved ones should keep them active, sharp, safe, interested and vital.
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Doug Aitken - The Source: Liz Diller | Tate

Doug Aitken - The Source: Liz Diller | Tate | brainstorms | Scoop.it
Doug Aitken talks to architect Liz Diller about creativity, influences and architecture in the 21st century. 'We like to take impossible things and make them happen'.
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Tibetan monk is world's happiest man, say neuroscientists - Examiner.com

Tibetan monk is world's happiest man, say neuroscientists - Examiner.com | brainstorms | Scoop.it
Examiner.comTibetan monk is world's happiest man, say neuroscientistsExaminer.com"It's a wonderful area of research because it shows that meditation is not just blissing out under a mango tree but it completely changes your brain and therefore...
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Amazon.com: Caroline Myss: Chakra Meditation Music: Stevin McNamara: Music

Caroline Myss: Chakra Meditation Music

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Amazon.com: Caroline Myss: Chakra Meditation Music: Stevin McNamara: Music (Stevin McNamara - Caroline Myss: Chakra Meditation Music reduced by 53%!
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Nanoogo Gets Funding To Spur Creativity In Kids | socalTECH.com

Nanoogo Gets Funding To Spur Creativity In Kids | socalTECH.com | brainstorms | Scoop.it
Nanoogo, an online service focused on helping encourage creativity in kids, has scored a round of angel funding from the Tech Coast Angels, according to a report today from the group.
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The Science of Making Decisions - Newsweek

The Science of Making Decisions - Newsweek | brainstorms | Scoop.it

Info-paralysis? The booming science of decision making has shown that more information can lead to objectively poorer choices, and to choices that people come to regret. It has shown that an unconscious system guides many of our decisions, and that it can be sidelined by too much information. And it has shown that decisions requiring creativity benefit from letting the problem incubate below the level of awareness—something that becomes ever-more difficult when information never stops arriving.


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tl;dr

tl;dr | brainstorms | Scoop.it

Mark: So I'm not up on my memes the way I should be. Today I finally found out what "tl;dr" means. It's an acronym for "Too Long; Didn't Read". Along with finding out what the term meant, I found tldr-- an incredible extension for Google Chrome. The extension will summarize a [very] long post/article and distill it into a paragraph or less for you to review and choose to read more if you want.

 

If you use Chrome, and you cover a lot of content, this is a must have.


Via Mark Strozier
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THE USES OF DIFFICULTY | More Intelligent Life

THE USES OF DIFFICULTY | More Intelligent Life | brainstorms | Scoop.it
The brain likes a challenge—and putting a few obstacles in its way may well boost its creativity. Ian Leslie takes a hard line...
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Ken Robinson says schools kill creativity | Video on TED.com

TED Talks Sir Ken Robinson makes an entertaining and profoundly moving case for creating an education system that nurtures (rather than undermines) creativity.
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Griffiths: Psilocybin Mimics Effects of Meditation

Complete program available for purchase at http://fora.tv/2012/10/27/Griffiths_Mystical_Experience_from_Psilocybin_Research Dr. Roland R. Griffiths, Professo...
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The Power of Mantras and Malas

Mantras are sacred words that use specific sounds designed to energize specific portions of the brain. Mantras using malas are a powerful meditation tool. Read more...
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TV character business cards revealed: Rick Grimes, Tyrion Lannister, more | EW.com

TV character business cards revealed: Rick Grimes, Tyrion Lannister, more | EW.com | brainstorms | Scoop.it
Hey Rick Grimes, what’s in your wallet? The folks over at UPrinting created these ultra-clever (and rather web-traffic savvy) business cards depicting what TV’s most... (Sweet project.
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5 Ways to Amp Up Your Creativity - Forbes

5 Ways to Amp Up Your Creativity - Forbes | brainstorms | Scoop.it
Whether you are in a brainstorming rut or feel too exhausted to muster up a germ of imagination, here are five action-oriented steps to propel you to the creativity big leagues.
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If You're Too Busy to Meditate, Read This

If You're Too Busy to Meditate, Read This | brainstorms | Scoop.it

If you're still looking for a business case to justify spending time meditating, try this one: Meditation makes you more productive. How? By increasing your capacity to resist distracting urges.

 

Research shows that an ability to resist urges will improve your relationships, increase your dependability, and raise your performance. If you can resist your urges, you can make better, more thoughtful decisions. You can be more intentional about what you say and how you say it. You can think about the outcome of your actions before following through on them.

 

Our ability to resist an impulse determines our success in learning a new behavior or changing an old habit. It's probably the single most important skill for our growth and development.

 


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Alida Birch's curator insight, December 12, 2012 11:18 AM

Staying focused is key to manifestation!

Anne Duncan's curator insight, April 4, 2014 9:26 AM

Who says meditation is a waste of time? Not me... but I will try to be more consistent after reading Peter Bregman's post.

Meditation teaches us to resist the urge of that counterproductive follow through. That alone is a great reason to practice meditation.