Brainology
27 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Mucosal Immunity
Scoop.it!

Integrative epigenome-wide analysis demonstrates that DNA methylation may mediate genetic risk in inflammatory bowel disease

Integrative epigenome-wide analysis demonstrates that DNA methylation may mediate genetic risk in inflammatory bowel disease | Brainology | Scoop.it
Epigenetic perturbations may be an important factor in diseases where both genes and environment play a role.
Via Gilbert C FAURE
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Mucosal Immunity
Scoop.it!

IL-17 Augments B Cell Activation in Ocular Surface Autoimmunity. - PubMed - NCBI

IL-17 Augments B Cell Activation in Ocular Surface Autoimmunity. - PubMed - NCBI | Brainology | Scoop.it
J Immunol. 2016 Sep 21. pii: 1502641. [Epub ahead of print]
Via Gilbert C FAURE
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Vertigo, Migraine (MAV), vestibular system
Scoop.it!

Magnetic pulses to the brain deliver long-lasting relief for tinnitus patients: Depression treatment tool holds tremendous promise for patients with debilitating condition

Magnetic pulses to the brain deliver long-lasting relief for tinnitus patients: Depression treatment tool holds tremendous promise for patients with debilitating condition | Brainology | Scoop.it
In the largest US clinical trial of its kind researchers found that transcranial magnetic stimulation significantly improved tinnitus symptoms for more than half of study participants.

Via Claudia M. Reder
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

Higher Media Multi-Tasking Activity Is Associated with Smaller Gray-Matter Density in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

Higher Media Multi-Tasking Activity Is Associated with Smaller Gray-Matter Density in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex | Brainology | Scoop.it
Media multitasking , or the concurrent consumption of multiple media forms, is increasingly prevalent in today’s society and has been associated with negative psychosocial and cognitive impacts. Individuals who engage in heavier media-multitasking are found to perform worse on cognitive control tasks and exhibit more socio-emotional difficulties. However, the neural processes associated with media multi-tasking remain unexplored. The present study investigated relationships between media multitasking activity and brain structure. Research has demonstrated that brain structure can be altered upon prolonged exposure to novel environments and experience. Thus, we expected differential engagements in media multitasking to correlate with brain structure variability. This was confirmed via Voxel-Based Morphometry (VBM) analyses: Individuals with higher Media Multitasking Index (MMI) scores had smaller gray matter density in the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC). Functional connectivity between this ACC region and the precuneus was negatively associated with MMI. Our findings suggest a possible structural correlate for the observed decreased cognitive control performance and socio-emotional regulation in heavy media-multitaskers. While the cross-sectional nature of our study does not allow us to specify the direction of causality, our results brought to light novel associations between individual media multitasking behaviors and ACC structure differences.

Via iPamba, Miloš Bajčetić
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

Acting Impulsively and Sensation Seeking May Be Linked to Brain Anatomy

Acting Impulsively and Sensation Seeking May Be Linked to Brain Anatomy | Brainology | Scoop.it
Holmes and colleagues examined the variability in brain structure among 1,234 males and females aged 18 to 35 with no history of psychiatric disorders or substance dependence. Using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), the team measured the size of particular regions of the brain for each participant. The participants also completed questionnaires assessing traits associated with sensation-seeking and impulsivity such as their need for novel and intense experiences, willingness to take risks, and a tendency to make rapid decisions. The participants also reported alcohol, tobacco, and caffeine usage.

They found that people who reported seeking high levels of stimulation or excitement had reduced cortical thickness, or gray matter, in brain regions associated with decision making and self-control. The strongest links occurred in brain areas related to the ability to regulate emotions and behavior, the anterior cingulate and middle frontal gyrus. Changes in those brain structures also correlated with participants’ self-reported tendency to act on impulse and with heightened use of alcohol, tobacco, or caffeine.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Cardiovascular Disease: PHARMACO-THERAPY
Scoop.it!

Autism study confirms beta-blocker improves conversation skills

Autism study confirms beta-blocker improves conversation skills | Brainology | Scoop.it

Long used to ease performance anxiety, blood pressure medicine improves some aspects of sociability in adults with autism


Via Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

Issues in Psycho-Oncology: What Clinicians Need to Know | Psychiatric Times

Issues in Psycho-Oncology: What Clinicians Need to Know | Psychiatric Times | Brainology | Scoop.it
An overview of select topics in clinical psycho-oncology, including assessment and management of delirium and brain lesions, mood and anxiety disorders, medication adverse effects, and existential death anxiety.

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

Building a better brain: Strengthening your mental muscle

Building a better brain: Strengthening your mental muscle | Brainology | Scoop.it
The scaffolding theory of aging shows how we can build a better brain.

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

Six Lessons About Mirror-Touch Synesthesia From Dr. Joel Salinas

Six Lessons About Mirror-Touch Synesthesia From Dr. Joel Salinas | Brainology | Scoop.it
A neurologist who can experience others' sensations and emotions shares how he stays "present," and what it's like to lose himself in a movie.

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

Could gut bacteria help make you more anxious?

Could gut bacteria help make you more anxious? | Brainology | Scoop.it
Stress during childhood can affect the make-up of our gut bacteria and this, in turn, could influence our mental health as adults, a new mouse study suggests.

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

Depression damages parts of the brain, research concludes

Depression damages parts of the brain, research concludes | Brainology | Scoop.it
Brain damage is caused by persistent depression rather than being a predisposing factor for it, researchers have finally concluded after decades of unconfirmed hypothesising.

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

Life-changing religious experience linked to brain atrophy

Life-changing religious experience linked to brain atrophy | Brainology | Scoop.it
A US study has found older adults claiming to have had a life-changing religious experience showed evidence of a shrinking…

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Videos, Podcasts
Scoop.it!

The 2014 Michael Fordham Prize - Journal of Analytical Psychology

The 2014 Michael Fordham Prize - Journal of Analytical Psychology | Brainology | Scoop.it
The Journal of Analytical Psychology 2014 Michael Fordham prize has been jointly awarded to Richard Carvalho and Christian Maier.

Via e-jungian
more...
e-jungian's curator insight, July 1, 2015 8:51 PM


Richard Carvalho – Synchronicity, the infinite unrepressed, dissociation and the interpersonal, JAP 2014, volume 59, issue 3
and Christian Maier – Intersubjectivity and the creation of meaning in the analytic process, JAP 2014, volume 59, issue 5
See the post for abstracts and links to the articles.

Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

Universities should ban PowerPoint — It makes students stupid and professors boring

Universities should ban PowerPoint — It makes students stupid and professors boring | Brainology | Scoop.it
Do you really believe that watching a lecturer read hundreds of PowerPoint slides is making you smarter?

I asked this of a class of 105 computer science and software engineering students last semester.

An article in The Conversation recently argued universities should ban PowerPoint because it makes students stupid and professors boring.

I agree entirely. However, most universities will ignore this good advice because rather than measuring success by how much their students learn, universities measure success with student satisfaction surveys, among other things.
What is so wrong with PowerPoint?

Overreliance on slides has contributed to the absurd belief that expecting and requiring students to read books, attend classes, take notes and do homework is unreasonable.

Courses designed around slides therefore propagate the myth that students can become skilled and knowledgeable without working through dozens of books, hundreds of articles and thousands of problems.

Via Miloš Bajčetić
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Big Data & Digital Marketing
Scoop.it!

Data Integration as a key for Big Data success

Data Integration as a key for Big Data success | Brainology | Scoop.it
If you want to figure out Big Data and marketing, it starts with one core tenet and eight basic questions.

Via Luca Naso
more...
Luca Naso's curator insight, November 15, 2015 11:50 AM

A key topic when trying to leverage Big Data is data integration.

Data integration can take long time and is crucial to really benefit from big data.

 

Silo breaking, made possible by data integration, is what can let a company move from applying short-term tactics to creating a long-term strategy.

 

It goes without saying that without some good questions (i.e. business objectives) even good data integration is of little use.

One good suggestion for defining the goal is to put the customer in the center, for real.

 

8 basic question to help you get started on the right track:

1. Who is your customer?

2. What do they need?

3. What data should you be looking for to see if you are delivering?

4. Where is the data coming from?

5. How is it stored/organized?

6. Who looks at it and how often?

7. Who is analyzing it?

8. Who is presenting it?

Auriane Boyé's curator insight, November 26, 2015 7:08 AM

A key topic when trying to leverage Big Data is data integration.

Data integration can take long time and is crucial to really benefit from big data.

 

Silo breaking, made possible by data integration, is what can let a company move from applying short-term tactics to creating a long-term strategy.

 

It goes without saying that without some good questions (i.e. business objectives) even good data integration is of little use.

One good suggestion for defining the goal is to put the customer in the center, for real.

 

8 basic question to help you get started on the right track:

1. Who is your customer?

2. What do they need?

3. What data should you be looking for to see if you are delivering?

4. Where is the data coming from?

5. How is it stored/organized?

6. Who looks at it and how often?

7. Who is analyzing it?

8. Who is presenting it?

Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Vertigo, Migraine (MAV), vestibular system
Scoop.it!

Brain MRI Shows Acupuncture Relieves Migraines

Brain MRI Shows Acupuncture Relieves Migraines | Brainology | Scoop.it
MRI images show acupuncture relieves migraines by restoring connectivity in the brain.

Via Claudia M. Reder
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Learning & Mind & Brain
Scoop.it!

What Makes Our Brains Special?

What Makes Our Brains Special? | Brainology | Scoop.it
The human brain is unique: Our remarkable cognitive capacity has allowed us to invent the wheel, build the pyramids and land on the moon. In fact, scientists sometimes refer to the human brain as the “crowning achievement of evolution.”

But what, exactly, makes our brains so special? Some leading arguments have been that our brains have more neurons and expend more energy than would be expected for our size, and that our cerebral cortex, which is responsible for higher cognition, is disproportionately large—accounting for over 80 percent of our total brain mass.

Suzana Herculano-Houzel, a neuroscientist at the Institute of Biomedical Science in Rio de Janeiro, debunked these well-established beliefs in recent years when she discovered a novel way of counting neurons—dissolving brains into a homogenous mixture, or “brain soup.” Using this technique she found the number of neurons relative to brain size to be consistent with other primates, and that the cerebral cortex, the region responsible for higher cognition, only holds around 20 percent of all our brain’s neurons, a similar proportion found in other mammals. In light of these findings, she argues that the human brain is actually just a linearly scaled-up primate brain that grew in size as we started to consume more calories, thanks to the advent of cooked food.

Via Wildcat2030, Miloš Bajčetić
more...
Miloš Bajčetić's curator insight, April 10, 6:33 AM
When the researchers compared humans with mice, they found that whereas the genes associated with neurons were well preserved among species, those associated with glial cells—nonneuronal cells with a wide variety of functions—were not. They also found the gene patterns associated with glia overlap with those implicated with disorders of the brain, such as Alzheimer’s disease. This adds to the recent developments revealing that glial cells, which for a long time were thought to simply be the brain’s support cells, are actually a major player in both development and disease. “It affirms the importance of these glial patterns in brain disease,” says Michael Hawrylycz, a computational biologist at the Allen Institute and first author of the study.

This finding may have another important implication—the capacity for plasticity; researchers have found the glia play an important role in shaping the brain. “One interesting thing in the context of [the uniqueness of the human brain] is that you could imagine that one way to enhance the system would be to make it more plastic—I'm hypothesizing here, but [glia] could potentially be one route to do that,” says Allen neuroscientist Ed Lein, senior author of the paper. “[But] we still need to do the analysis to see whether this is specific to humans or is common among primates.”
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Cardiovascular Disease: PHARMACO-THERAPY
Scoop.it!

More Doctors Are Prescribing Exercise Instead of Medication

More Doctors Are Prescribing Exercise Instead of Medication | Brainology | Scoop.it
More Doctors Are Prescribing Exercise Instead of Medication
Via Aviva Lev-Ari, PhD, RN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Mucosal Immunity
Scoop.it!

Just Skin Deep — Your Immune System at the Surface | The Student Blog

Just Skin Deep — Your Immune System at the Surface | The Student Blog | Brainology | Scoop.it

The skin is the human body’s largest organ. At 1.8 square meters for the average adult, skin covers about as much area as a large closet, and accounts for 12-15% of total body weight.


Via Gilbert C FAURE
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from Mucosal Immunity
Scoop.it!

Mucosal immunology Battle scars - Nature.com

Mucosal immunology Battle scars
Nature.com
It has been proposed that acute infections could serve as triggers for the development of chronic inflammatory diseases. However, supporting evidence for this idea has been lacking.

Via Gilbert C FAURE
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

New Doubts About Role of Serotonin in Depression

New Doubts About Role of Serotonin in Depression | Brainology | Scoop.it
The common belief that depression is linked to low levels of the neurotransmitter serotonin is again being questioned by top psychiatrists. Professor David Healy of the Hergest Unit, Bangor, U.K., writes in the British Medical Journal that the idea that...

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

Path Out of Poverty? Education Plus Neuroscience

Path Out of Poverty? Education Plus Neuroscience | Brainology | Scoop.it
Key Points Children raised in poverty are exposed to millions of fewer spoken words at home Income level negatively impacts cognitive functions There are links between family income and memory and attention Poverty is associated with chronic stress which can have a toxic effect on brain architecture

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

Self-healing brain study offers Alzheimer's hope

Self-healing brain study offers Alzheimer's hope | Brainology | Scoop.it
Brains are smart enough to rewire themselves, a new international study of rats has found. The study turns on its head the…

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

My message to the parents who can't let their children go: grow up | Phillip Hodson

My message to the parents who can't let their children go: grow up | Phillip Hodson | Brainology | Scoop.it
Phillip Hodson: Those who don't encourage their sons and daughters to be independent are guilty of psychological abuse

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by NIEN-HSIEN (LOUIS) LIOU from labyrinth
Scoop.it!

Are funeral directors at risk of neurodegenerative disease?

Are funeral directors at risk of neurodegenerative disease? | Brainology | Scoop.it
Are funeral directors at risk of neurodegenerative disease?

Exposure to formaldehyde in embalming fluid may be putting funeral directors at increased risk of developing amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), also known as Lou Gehrig's disease. The US study looked at data from 1.5 million adult

Via Janet Devlin
more...
No comment yet.