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Normative Gendered Messages

Normative Gendered Messages | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it

 

Here are two shirts are from the Avengers.  Both are designed for their children apparel production line, but I don't have to tell you which one is marketed for boys and which one is marketed for girls.

 

Questions to ponder: How (and why) do companies use cultural ideas and values to market their products?  How do companies shape cultural ideas and values?  What impact do messages like this have on a society's culture?  Do seemingly subtle differences is pop cultural products like this matter?  

 

Tags: perspective, culture, gender,  popular culture.


Via Seth Dixon
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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:14 PM

Commercials don't always try to sell you stuff, they try to appeal to you.  Heroism appeals to people, but people are trying to sell you shirts that advertise comicbooks in a trinity of marketing efforts.  Social appeal, by referring to heros, sales by selling the shirt, and advertising comics.  I like comics, but I would rather spend money on comic books, or go into the world and make a difference and BE a hero (or eat a hero at a hoagie hut) than buy one of those shirts.  My spiritual beliefs are open to allowing the sales of these shirts, but my preference does not incline me to actually purchase one.  I am 'free' in this country to buy or not to buy a shirt.  I'm a long-time supporter of art, and I like the idea the shirt puts forward- supporting heroism and comic books, belief in scifi/fantasy art and concepts, and I agree that someone should buy that shirt... but I feel that I could do more by actually being a hero than telling people to be heros.  By using comic book heros, the advertisers say that nobody on this world is a hero, because they 'aren't real,' but also that anybody can be a hero by striving towards virtue of the pure ideal idols in the comics.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 9:15 PM

Companies before they put any product in the market they do research first for example; what people are buying, they take in consideration gender and culture. And why is that? Because they are not going to create a product that no one is going to buy. The impact that this type of messages like this have on a society‚Äôs culture. No matter how many laws are make in favor woman equality are created we are being  perceived as the weak sex, that we need the help of a man to do anything. Sadly but true this type of campaign it was sales

Michele Baker's curator insight, March 12, 11:39 AM

This is a really depressing trend, and one that, as the parent of a daughter, I am all too aware of. It's way past time we start rethinking the way we dictate gender roles in children.

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The Daily Mail Song

mp3 here: http://bit.ly/9zPBDi We're aware this video won't mean an awful lot if you've never heard of The Daily Mail (a British Newspaper), but on the plus side, you've never heard of The Daily Mail.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, December 12, 2012 5:18 PM

As more of our students go searching for information online, we need to also teach our students how to assess the quality of a particular media outlet and develop a critical eye.  This great song is a humorous way to approach that topic. 


Questions to Ponder: What makes a source reliable?  Can a source be reliable on some topics but not others?     

    

Here's an article about how an over-reliance on GPS (or Sat-Nav) can lead to the erosion of one's mental map.  And yes, the article is from the Daily Mail (as the images on the side clearly demonstrate).  Does that change how you approach the information?