Brainfriendly, mo...
Follow
Find tag "globalization"
4.5K views | +0 today
Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners
Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Aulde de Barbuat from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Beijing's Pollution

Beijing's Pollution | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it
Seth Dixon's insight:

We've all heard stories about the horrible air quality in Beijing (especially during the 2008 Olympics).  Here's a picture of Beijing by Tom Anderson that I find riveting.  The skies are obviously polluted but this image shows two competing cities that are vying for control of China's future. In the foreground we see a cosmopolitan capital that is sophisticated and technologically advanced, engaged in the great connections that come from industrial growth.  On the other side we see the industrial city that is recklessly producing copious amounts of consumer products with little regard for the environment or worker safety that can be seen as the dirty side of globalization.  Both images are true reflections of China in the 21st century and the tension between the two will be one of China's great issues in the foreseeable future.       




Via Seth Dixon
more...
Jacob Crowell's curator insight, November 24, 2:21 PM

Great picture to show the two sectors of China's society. In Beijing we see the combination of industry and post industrialized. 

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, November 24, 11:40 PM

This picture taken by a photographer with the perfect lighting is brilliant....that is, if you're into deceiving people that the pollution from these power plants stays away from the higher class businesses and residences.  Looking at this picture you see the smoke coming from the power plant in China far in the distance creating a yellowish hue that could be thought to be from the sun.  Then closer in the scene we see what appears to be businesses and potentially some peoples homes.  This area is in a totally different color from the yellow we see to be associated with the pollution from the power plant.  Here we see a blue, commonly associated with clean water, covering the entirety of this area.  With the difference in colors these places seem to be as different as possible from each other.  In reality though, smog doesn't just stay in one area of the city where it is produced, but spreads throughout the entirety of a city.  There are no restraints on where the pollution can and can't be, it is free flowing into communities where people work and live.  If you're trying to sell a house here this picture wouldn't be a bad idea to use, although most natives aren't oblivious to what is really going on.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 8:00 PM

This picture is interesting to say the least, it depicts two different cities, even though it is the same city. the picture does a good job at showing the major problem that pollution is causing to Beijing. While showing a smog surrounded city behind a clean, yet clouded looking city, drives this point of pollution home and raises the question is putting large factories and toxic fumes in the air, more important than the well being of your citizens?

Rescooped by Aulde de Barbuat from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of

Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it
Dandies in Congo, emos in Iraq, electro-hillbilly truckers in Japan. No matter how hard life can be, people carve out original ways of living.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Treathyl Fox's comment, February 8, 2013 11:20 AM
P.S. The guy in the top photo reminded me of my dad. He was always a sharp-dressed man! :)
John Dyhouse's comment, February 25, 2013 11:35 AM
Interesting cultures showing that people have a need to identify with their peers to be one step ahead of the crowd, I guess
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 17, 12:35 PM

When considering subcultures, it is sometimes easy to forget that they exist in other countries. While I was familiar with groups such as the "chavs" in England, and the Dandies in the Congo, I never realized that some subcultures that are prevalent in the USA exist in places such as Indonesia. It's amazing to see how some fads have globalized and are present in different places. I doubt that the Ramones, while making music in their garage would dream that they would spark a globally present subculture. 

Rescooped by Aulde de Barbuat from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many feel that corporate expansion within the food industries is inevitable because that's what we are currently experiencing in highly globalized countries such as the United States.  Bolivia proves an example of a country that that has rejected corporate hegemony in the marketplace because they support traditional food choices and local vendors.  Keep in mind that we shouldn't overly romanticize Bolivia, but they are a compelling example showing that consumers can impact food options.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 27, 2:34 PM

McDonalds broke in Quinoa Bolivia. A somewhat interesting news because McDonalds is a fast food restaurant quite famous and to break is pretty rare. But Bolivians prefer hamburgers that the Chachitas do and they also prefer to eat their daily diet than fast food. This place called Quinoa in Bolivia is a really interesting place free of McDonald.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:28 PM

Bolivia is one of the few countries where McDonalds failed, so Bolivia is obviously doing something right in regards to its food industry. Bolivians' love of traditional food coupled with the loyalty to street vendors and local businesses. Bolivia does not treat its food industries as a potential market, but instead many food transactions involve trade as opposed to currency. Laws conserving local food culture and the elimination of most foreign parties has allowed for a very effective food sovereignty. 

 

Many countries, especially the United States, could benefit from this "food sovereignty", where the local individuals are honored and protected while large corporations are kept an arm's length away. Not only does this boost local small scale economies, but it would decrease pollution and preserve food culture.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 12:00 AM

"A Country With No McDonalds". I read this and thought to myself, how bad can that be? McDonalds isn't exactly the best option for food. In Bolivia, McDonalds doesn't exist and hasn't for about a decade. Believe it or not, McDonalds couldn't survive in the mountainous area so they were forced to close down in 2002. In 2011, a documentary was made about how odd it was that Bolivia didn't have a McDonalds. The documentary tells us that one of the main reasons the fast food restaurant closed down was because Bolivians preferred their traditional food over fast food. The documentary also stated that Bolivians do love hamburgers, which are not traditional. However, they prefer to buy them from the many indigenous women hawking food on the streets. People line up for these hamburgers on the street, so its almost like their own form of McDonalds. Mostly, they prefer to buy from people they have a relationship with, typically from their own community.