Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners
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Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners
Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners
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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

 

Seth Dixon's insight:

Many feel that corporate expansion within the food industries is inevitable because that's what we are currently experiencing in highly globalized countries such as the United States.  Bolivia proves an example of a country that that has rejected corporate hegemony in the marketplace because they support traditional food choices and local vendors.  Keep in mind that we shouldn't overly romanticize Bolivia, but they are a compelling example showing that consumers can impact food options.


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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 28, 2015 5:50 PM

This is a fine example of people looking out for one another.  It might be easier to industrialize their food market but it's more admirable to preserve tradition, help small indigenous business, and try your best at making the country more healthy.  I applaud them for doing this.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:33 PM

I think I might want to move to Bolivia one day! Reciprocity is often a term used for corporate culture; you but from me and I'll buy from you type of relationship. This is still true in Bolivia only they do it on a much more personal level. Farmers share equipment, they share crops, seeds and develop a rapport not easily undone by corporations such as McDonald's. Bolivia's multiple micro-climates allow it to grow a wide variety of foods for their citizens, thus making it easier to trade within their circle of neighborhood farmers. "I'll trade you ten pounds of potatoes for five pounds of Quinoa."

The article goes on to state that Bolivians do indeed love their hamburgers, a handful of Subway's and Burger King's still do business there, but the heritage of picking a burger from a street vendor has been passed down by generations. These cholitas, as they are called, sell their fare in the streets of Bolivia and this type of transaction is not easily duplicated by large corporations. I have added Bolivia to my bucket list...

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 30, 2015 10:28 PM

" Whats Bolivia doing so right that McDonalds couldn't make it there?"

Food is not a commericial space here.

Morales, speaking to the United Nations General Assembly in February, slammed U.S. fast-food chains, calling them a “great harm to humanity” and accusing them of trying to control food production globally.

“They impose their customs and their foods,” he said. “They seek profit and to merely standardize food, produced on a massive scale, according to the same formula and with ingredients which cause cancers and other diseases.”

Even still, with one of the lightest carbon footprints in the world, cherished food practices and progressive food sovereignty laws on the books, Bolivia could still be a model to the rest of the world—the United States especially—for a healthier, more community-based food system.

 

What an insightful read. I never thought of considering our food a s a "commercial space" but that is essentially exactly what it is. Our food has been extremely commercialized. Products our pushed through advertisement continuously. Most of the foods in America are not even real food but food products, factory made. This is absolutely a role model country for how food should be consumed.

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History of the English Language

History of the English Language | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it

"What we know as the English Language today has evolved over thousands of years, influenced by migrating tribes, conquering armies and peaceful trade. Do you know the origins of the language you speak? Have a look at this detailed infographic from  Brighton School of Business and Management."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 2013 10:26 AM

Languages, just like cultures, are incredibly dynamic and have changed over time.  Many people like to imagine an older version of their own culture of "how it used to be" or even "how it's always was."  This is an illusion though, to pretend as though cultural change is something new.  This fantasy allows for people to nostalgically yearn for what once was, even if that perceived pristine past was but a fleeting moment in history that was shaped by many other peoples, places and times. 


Tags: English, language, culture, infographic, historical.

Christian Allié's comment, July 2, 2013 4:41 AM
Interesting scale.....thanks!
joelle's comment, July 2, 2013 10:31 AM
:-)
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ProjectBritain.com - A resource of British Life and Culture in the UK by Woodlands Junior

ProjectBritain.com - A resource of British Life and Culture in the UK by Woodlands Junior | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it
An easy to read website with lots of fascinating fact and information about the countries and festivals of the UK.

Via Esther, Teacher Rose, COURS PARTICULIERS, Teacher Flo , Renee Maufroid
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Esther's curator insight, January 29, 2013 12:12 PM

Loads of culture material

COURS PARTICULIERS's curator insight, February 13, 2013 2:23 AM

un site très riche et accessible en anglais pour mieux connaître Royaume Uni (traditions, géographie, famille royale, etc.)

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Normative Gendered Messages

Normative Gendered Messages | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it

 

Here are two shirts are from the Avengers.  Both are designed for their children apparel production line, but I don't have to tell you which one is marketed for boys and which one is marketed for girls.

 

Questions to ponder: How (and why) do companies use cultural ideas and values to market their products?  How do companies shape cultural ideas and values?  What impact do messages like this have on a society's culture?  Do seemingly subtle differences is pop cultural products like this matter?  

 

Tags: perspective, culture, gender,  popular culture.


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Matthew DiLuglio's curator insight, October 12, 2013 6:14 PM

Commercials don't always try to sell you stuff, they try to appeal to you.  Heroism appeals to people, but people are trying to sell you shirts that advertise comicbooks in a trinity of marketing efforts.  Social appeal, by referring to heros, sales by selling the shirt, and advertising comics.  I like comics, but I would rather spend money on comic books, or go into the world and make a difference and BE a hero (or eat a hero at a hoagie hut) than buy one of those shirts.  My spiritual beliefs are open to allowing the sales of these shirts, but my preference does not incline me to actually purchase one.  I am 'free' in this country to buy or not to buy a shirt.  I'm a long-time supporter of art, and I like the idea the shirt puts forward- supporting heroism and comic books, belief in scifi/fantasy art and concepts, and I agree that someone should buy that shirt... but I feel that I could do more by actually being a hero than telling people to be heros.  By using comic book heros, the advertisers say that nobody on this world is a hero, because they 'aren't real,' but also that anybody can be a hero by striving towards virtue of the pure ideal idols in the comics.

Ana Cristina Gil's curator insight, November 6, 2013 9:15 PM

Companies before they put any product in the market they do research first for example; what people are buying, they take in consideration gender and culture. And why is that? Because they are not going to create a product that no one is going to buy. The impact that this type of messages like this have on a society’s culture. No matter how many laws are make in favor woman equality are created we are being  perceived as the weak sex, that we need the help of a man to do anything. Sadly but true this type of campaign it was sales

Michele Baker's curator insight, March 12, 2014 11:39 AM

This is a really depressing trend, and one that, as the parent of a daughter, I am all too aware of. It's way past time we start rethinking the way we dictate gender roles in children.

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Webexhibits

Webexhibits | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it
webexhibits is an interactive museum of science, humanities and culture. It covers a wide variety of topics.
Aulde de Barbuat's insight:
Causes of colours - Calendars - Daylight Saving Time - Pigments through the ages - Feast of the Gods Giovanni Bellini - Poetry Through the ages - Van Gogh’s Letters - Butter
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Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of

Foreign Subcultures You've Never Heard Of | Brainfriendly, motivating stuff for ESL EFL learners | Scoop.it
Dandies in Congo, emos in Iraq, electro-hillbilly truckers in Japan. No matter how hard life can be, people carve out original ways of living.

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Treathyl Fox's comment, February 8, 2013 11:20 AM
P.S. The guy in the top photo reminded me of my dad. He was always a sharp-dressed man! :)
John Dyhouse's comment, February 25, 2013 11:35 AM
Interesting cultures showing that people have a need to identify with their peers to be one step ahead of the crowd, I guess
Kaitlin Young's curator insight, September 17, 2014 12:35 PM

When considering subcultures, it is sometimes easy to forget that they exist in other countries. While I was familiar with groups such as the "chavs" in England, and the Dandies in the Congo, I never realized that some subcultures that are prevalent in the USA exist in places such as Indonesia. It's amazing to see how some fads have globalized and are present in different places. I doubt that the Ramones, while making music in their garage would dream that they would spark a globally present subculture.