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Rescooped by Beth A. Williams from Cancer Survivorship
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Evidence Based Lifestyle and Self Help Strategies After Cancer

'Together Against Cancer' Conference October 2013. A PowerPoint presentation entitled "Evidence based lifestyle and self help strategies after Cancer". By Pr...

Via Graham Player Ph.D., Tambre Leighn
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Yes, yes, yes...a pathway to wellbeing - nutritious food and physical activity!

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Graham Player Ph.D.'s curator insight, April 13, 2015 2:16 AM

This is an informative presentation (46 mins) delivered by Professor Dr. Robert Thomas, a Consultant Oncologist at Addenbrooke's and Bedford Hospitals, a visiting Professor at Cranfield University and a clinical teacher at Cambridge University.

 

He talks about the benefits of lifestyle, exercise and diet in relation to cancer.

 

You may want to recommend to your doctor to watch this.

Graham Player Ph.D.'s comment, April 13, 2015 12:28 PM
The results of the UK NCRN Pomi-T study referred to by Professor Dr. Robert Thomas can be seen here published in Nature Magazine - http://www.nature.com/pcan/journal/v17/n2/full/pcan20146a.html
Tambre Leighn's curator insight, April 17, 2015 11:16 AM

Yes, yes, yes...a pathway to wellbeing - nutritious food and physical activity!

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13 Ways I Live My Life With Purpose After Cancer

13 Ways I Live My Life With Purpose After Cancer | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Although I didn't always feel empowered or plan on becoming a cancer advocate, I found strength in following a few simple life rules I learned along the way. In honor of my cancerversary, I want to share with you 13 ways I now live my life with purpo...

Via Tambre Leighn
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Words of wisdom and inspiration to pay attention to -- each one is worth savoring for a full, abundant life. 

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, December 19, 2014 2:38 PM

Inspiring words and insights from the amazing Tamika Felder. Great information for cancer survivors...check it out.

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REGISTRATION Opens for YSC Summit: The Only National Conference for Young Women Affected by Breast Cancer and Their Co-Survivors

REGISTRATION Opens for YSC Summit: The Only National Conference for Young Women Affected by Breast Cancer and Their Co-Survivors | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
NEW YORK, Nov. 20, 2014 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Though breast cancer is less common in younger women, more than 250,000 women living in the U.S. today were diagnosed before their 41st birthday, and 13,000 more will be diagnosed this year. Young Survival Coalition (YSC) is bringing them together for the YSC Summit, March 6-8, 2015, in Houston, Texas.

Via Tambre Leighn
Beth A. Williams's insight:

A resource for education, support, and wellness, the YSC is offering a national conference for young women breast cancer survivors and their co-survivors.

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, November 22, 2014 1:26 AM

Registration is open - join hundreds of women in March 2015 and get educated, connected, inspired...and have a ton of fun. Incredible roster of expert speakers and session topics.

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New Study Suggests Meditation Can Actually Alter Your Body On A Cellular Level | IFLScience

New Study Suggests Meditation Can Actually Alter Your Body On A Cellular Level | IFLScience | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Scientists aren’t quite sure how the placebo effect works. This phenomenon occurs when a patient believes they are getting treatment and their condition begins to improve, despite not actually receiving medication with an active ingredient.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

This study provides some confirmation of my belief that mindfulness, meditation, yoga and similar activities can significantly improve both the quality of life and length of life. Looking forward to more science looking at the health benefits of these activities.

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, November 12, 2014 1:36 PM

Since most people are well aware, thanks to coloring each month of the year in a different hue, how about moving, instead to actionable steps - like Meditation Month - where everyone commits to meditating daily in an experiment to see how it changes their lives - 30 days to a new healthy habit. Let's move awareness to action and improving lifestyle choices. Time to stop talking about health and instead BE health!

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Post cancer treatment is an important phase of cancer care | Bluegrass Moms | Kentucky.com

Post cancer treatment is an important phase of cancer care | Bluegrass Moms | Kentucky.com | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Cancer care doesn't end when treatment for it is over. It is important for all survivors to know that the follow-up care after the completion of cancer treatment is important for their health and may affect their survival.

Via Tambre Leighn
Beth A. Williams's insight:

This is so needed! Coming in 2015 will be welcomed.

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:37 PM

Not only is it important, it is being mandated for Comprehensive Cancer Treatment Centers by the Commission on Cancer starting in January 2015! Time for a change with more tools and resources invested in survivorship. Quantity of days must also include quality of life!

Beth A. Williams's curator insight, October 14, 2014 6:40 PM

Given how many survivors there are, with the numbers steadily browning, this will truly be a value-add to our healthcare system in 2015.

Rescooped by Beth A. Williams from Healthcare and Technology news
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Are We Closer to a Cancer Cure?

Are We Closer to a Cancer Cure? | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it

Last year, 20-year-old Milton Wright III seemed to finally have his life on track.

After seemingly endless interruptions to his education, his football career, and his plans to join the Marines, he found his way. He launched a modeling career and appeared in ads for brands including Zumiez and Adidas. He all but forgot he'd ever had cancer.

 
  

"I finally felt like things were going in the direction I wanted them to," Wright says.

But then, 5 years and 2 months into his second remission from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), Wright slipped on a sidewalk and heard his ribs crack. He walked the few blocks to Seattle Children's Hospital. He had lived nearby since shortly after he was diagnosed with leukemia at age 8. He'd spent several years there in treatment for two bouts of leukemia -- the second when he was 15.

After examining his ribs and drawing blood, the emergency nurse told Wright to follow up with blood cancer doctors. "That's when I added everything up," he recalls. "The broken ribs, the blood samples. They think I have it again." 

Wright knew kids who'd gotten leukemia a third time. "None of them survived. That's when they give you your 6 months. I realized that I was going to die soon."

Wright's doctor, Rebecca A. Gardner, MD, an assistant professor in pediatrics at the University of Washington, did confirm his leukemia was back, but she didn't give him 6 months. As the lead researcher in a new clinical trial, she suggested Wright be the second person to take part. The first person had no remaining signs of leukemia just 9 days after treatment began.

The trial tests a type of immunotherapy, a new wave of experimental and newly approved treatments that spur the immune system to fight off cancer like it does other illnesses.

Some doctors and scientists call it the pathway to a cure. Among them is Lynn M. Schuchter, MD, chief of hematology/oncology at the University of Pennsylvania. "We are supercharging the immune system," she says. "This brings a totally new dimension to attacking a cancer cell."

To a T

Some cancer cells share traits with healthy cells, making them unrecognizable as abnormal to the immune system. Wright's immune system learned to spot them. Through Gardner's clinical trial, researchers genetically modified Wright's own T cells -- white blood cells that survey the body for infections and other abnormalities -- to recognize and attack his leukemia. After researchers reengineered Wright's cells in the lab, he got his cells back through an IV, and everyone waited for him to get a fever. Fever is a sign the T cells are working, but if doctors can't manage the fever, they might have to kill off the T cells with a different drug and end the cancer treatment.

To a T continued...

Two weeks after he got the cells, Wright's fever landed him in intensive care and doctors considered killing the cells. "I wasn't ready for them to do that. I asked if we could give it another day or two." Two days later, Wright's fever dropped. A few days after that, when he was well enough for a spinal tap to test for leukemia, the cancer was gone.

A year later, it's still hard for Wright to believe. "When I say I'm cured, I don't feel 100% sure. But according to my blood work, they can't find a single cancer cell in my body."

 
  

Wright has since had a bone marrow transplant -- another safeguard against relapse. His recovery seems like a miracle to him, but scores of people with this type of leukemia have now gone into remission after similar treatments.

"It's not just a handful of patients. It's an expanding number at multiple centers," says Renier J. Brentjens, MD, PhD, an oncologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. He has spent 20 years researching ways to manipulate immune cells to fight cancer. "That's often an indication that you're not looking at a one-patient thing or a fluke."

Since 2009, researchers at Sloan Kettering, University of Pennsylvania, and the National Cancer Institute have tried this treatment on about 100 people with ALL. More than 70 have gone into complete remission. Some form of this experimental treatment is in trials at dozens of institutes around the world.

"This is a very, very bad disease. The 3-year overall survival after relapse is less than 10%," Brentjens says. "Most of the patients that we've seen for a 6-month visit after the T cell therapy are at or past what their expected survival was when they first came into our clinic."

Researchers continue testing modified T cells in patients with other types of leukemia, lymphoma, and myeloma -- all blood cancers. "The question is: Can we expand this technology to more common tumors -- colon cancer, ovarian cancer, breast cancer?" Brentjens says. "I don't know. But I think so."

Brake Test

In another form of immunotherapy, researchers attempt to release the "brakes" on the immune system. Cancer is allowed to develop in the first place, in part, because the immune system doesn't attack everything that crosses its path. It has brakes, so to speak. Without them, the body would be in a constant state of fever, rash, or other inflammatory immune response. Researchers are now exploring how to temporarily release those brakes to unleash the immune system on cancer cells without attacking the rest of the body.

"Melanoma has been the poster child for this type of immunotherapy," says Schuchter. This type of treatment shows promise in cancers of the lungs, bladder, and kidneys as well.

Brake Test continued...

Certain proteins on the surface of immune cells control these so-called brakes. The drugs that release the brakes are man-made antibodies that shut down one or another of those proteins. The body makes antibodies naturally to attack threatening substances in the blood, such as bacteria and viruses. The man-made antibodies recognize one of these T cell proteins as a threat, block it, and set the immune system free against it.

The risk, though, is that the immune system could attack normal cells, too. This can result in problems such as colitis, tears in the intestines, hepatitis, severe skin rash, and inflammation of the pituitary and thyroid glands.

 
  

"They are really serious side effects -- manageable but serious," Schuchter says.

Other man-made antibodies in development and early use target different steps in cancer growth and progress. Some people with advanced metastatic melanoma -- the most deadly skin cancer -- go into complete remission after treatment with drugs such as ipilimumab (marketed as Yervoy), which release the brakes on the immune system.

By the time Thomas Sasura, a contractor from Broadview, OH, was diagnosed with melanoma at age 55 in late 2010, the cancer had spread to his lungs, liver, and brain. He soon had palpable lumps in his back and under his arm. Before his last scheduled round of chemotherapy at Cancer Treatment Centers of America Eastern Regional Medical Center in Philadelphia, Sasura and his doctor could still feel some of the lumps in his body.

"That's when he introduced me to Yervoy," Sasura says. The doctor had never prescribed the brand-new drug and warned that he had no idea how Sasura might respond. But Sasura had nothing to lose. Three weeks after his first 90-minute drip, all the lumps were gone.

"I couldn't believe it. They said it normally takes two or three injections to kick in," he said. Sasura finished the treatment -- four infusions over the course of 12 weeks -- and he has been in remission ever since. Scans still show cancer in his body, but it doesn't grow and it sometimes shrinks.

"Not all patients respond, but for some, all the tumor goes away, which is highly unusual in melanoma," Schuchter says. "We have patients who had metastatic disease, who are now out 4 years without any evidence of melanoma. I'm beginning to use the words ‘possibly cured.'"

Researchers hope these results can be repeated in other cancers. Current clinical trials with ipilimumab include people with cancers of the breast, lungs, cervix, prostate, head and neck, pancreas, kidneys, and blood. The FDA approved a new brake-cutting cancer drug, pembrolizumab (marketed as Keytruda) last month. Others await approval possibly later this year.

Back to the Future

A year or more after immunotherapy, people like Sasura and Wright no longer consider how they'll spend their final days. They get on with their lives. Sasura is back to work remodeling kitchens and bathrooms. Wright got the green light to return to the gym months before most transplant recipients. Back in shape, he wants to return to modeling. "I feel like this treatment worked," Wright says. "I feel I am truly done with this."

 

 


Via Technical Dr. Inc.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

This is a hopeful antidote to the articles that proclaim cancer mortality is worse today than it was years ago. With several promising immunotherapy treatments, even the most virulent forms of cancer are on track for "cures."

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Brain Tumor Symptoms

Brain Tumor Symptoms | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Brain tumor symptoms vary from patient to patient, and most of these symptoms can also be found in people who do NOT have brain tumors. Therefore, the...
Beth A. Williams's insight:

It's good advice to pay attention and see a doctor if you notice changes in any of the most frequent symptoms noted in the article. The challenge is that often the symptoms are so gradual, we don't make the conscious connection to something different going on. We human are amazingly adaptable!

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Handheld scanner could make brain tumor removal more complete, reducing recurrence

Handheld scanner could make brain tumor removal more complete, reducing recurrence | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
handheld-scanner-could-make-brain-tumor-removal-more-complete-reducing-recurrence (Interesting and hopeful that this will work and help in the removal of brain tumours!
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Another bit of good news regarding advances in treating brain tumors. In my own situation, the fact that the MRIs continued to show "flare" along the perimeter of the cavity led to a year of chemo before moving to a regular schedule of follow-up scans.

 

This scanner method would allow the surgeon to remove all the cancer cells while leaving healthy cells undamaged. What a HUGE development!

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Rescooped by Beth A. Williams from Project Virtual Tumor Cancer in silico and Alternative Cancer Therapies
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Nanoparticles Highlight Tumor Borders During Brain Surgery

Nanoparticles Highlight Tumor Borders During Brain Surgery | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it

By Katherine Bourzac

 

Using a handheld Raman scanner and nanosized contrast agents that accumulate in brain tumors, surgeons detected and removed tiny, deadly clusters of cancer cells in mice that were not visible to the naked eye (ACS Nano 2014, DOI: 10.1021/nn503948b). If the contrast agent is proven safe for use in people, the technique could help doctors do a more thorough job of removing brain tumors and improve patient survival.

Most patients with brain tumors called glioblastomas die within 15 months of diagnosis, even after surgery. Microscopic clusters of cancer cells remain after surgery and reseed the tumor. “There is cancer recurrence at the surgical site in almost all cases of advanced-stage glioblastoma,” says Moritz F. Kircher, a radiologist at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. “Surgeons work by look and feel—the tumor is hard—but it’s hard to find the tumor margins.”

Researchers want to develop imaging techniques that can spot these cells at the margins while a surgeon is operating. Some groups have focused on Raman imaging because, in theory, tumor and healthy tissue produce unique, characteristic Raman signals. In practice, however, analyzing the differences between these signals in patients is difficult and can take hours—much too slow a process to use during surgery.

So Kircher has been developing a Raman contrast agent to help surgeons spot tumor tissue in real time. Kircher’s contrast agent is a 120-nm-diameter sphere consisting of a dye-coated gold core wrapped in a silica crust. The gold enhances the Raman signal of the dye molecules, which serve as Raman reporters for wherever the particles accumulate. The silica crust protects this dye coating from the surrounding biological environment.

In previous work, Kircher and colleagues demonstrated that similar nanoparticles accumulate in mouse glioblastomas and can help visualize tumor cells under a Raman microscope (Nat. Med. 2012, DOI: 10.1038/nm.2721). However, Kircher says, using a Raman microscope during surgery is cumbersome and provides the surgeon with a limited angle of view.

Kircher wanted to see if the contrast agent would work with a handheld Raman scanner—a device resembling a laser pointer on a cord that is more operating-room friendly. In the new study, neurosurgeons performed tumor resection on mice with glioblastoma tumors, using either their naked eyes and white light—as they do in the clinic—or the nanoparticle contrast agent and a handheld Raman scanner. The day before the surgery, the researchers injected the contrast agent into the mice. During the procedure, the surgeons held the scanner over the surgical field. They could look up at a screen displaying a real-time Raman image, with bright spots indicating the presence of the nanoparticles. The researchers also imaged the mice’s brains using a Raman microscope.

During the operation, surgeons using the handheld system found small clusters of cancer cells that weren’t visible under white light or under the Raman microscope. After the surgery, researchers examined stained slices of the brain tissue under an optical microscope and found no detectable cancer cells remaining in the mice that were operated on using the new method.

This kind of real-time imaging would be helpful for many kinds of cancer surgeries, says Shuming Nie of Emory University and Georgia Institute of Technology, who is also developing Raman contrast agents. He hopes that biomedical companies will pick up these contrast agents to determine whether the particles are safe for use in people and can be manufactured at a large scale—two types of tests beyond the capabilities of most academic labs.


Via Miguel Martín-Landrove
Beth A. Williams's insight:

This could become a breakthrough advance in cancer surgery, enabling surgeons to remove microscopic cancer cells not visible to the naked eye and thereby reducing the rate of tumor recurrence.

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Teen battles brain cancer with vivacious smile

Teen battles brain cancer with vivacious smile | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
She's been called "inspiring" and "humble" but neither word seems to define the courage 15-year-old Victoria Boals displays each day in her fight against an inoperable brain tumor.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Inspiration can come from so many sources. The strength of the human spirit is a wonder, and coming from a child, even more so.

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Army couple respond to brain cancer diagnosis with a new commitment to ... - Fayetteville Observer

Army couple respond to brain cancer diagnosis with a new commitment to ... - Fayetteville Observer | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Army couple respond to brain cancer diagnosis with a new commitment to ...
Fayetteville Observer
Army couple respond to brain cancer diagnosis with a new commitment to healthful living By Drew Brooks Staff writer.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

This is an inspiring example of choice and changing the things we have control over, like diet, exercise and mental attitude. 

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My metastatic melanoma brain tumor and me-Year 1 - ChicagoNow (blog)

My metastatic melanoma brain tumor and me-Year 1 - ChicagoNow (blog) | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
My metastatic melanoma brain tumor and me-Year 1
ChicagoNow (blog)
So, if you pay attention to statistics, I shouldn't be here.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Yet another anecdote that lets us know that no one can accurately predict how long we will live. Donna Jeanne is living proof that we can live life on our own terms based on mental attitude, determination and the mysteries of life, not based on what others tell us.

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After Recovering From A Brain Tumor, Anthony Belfiore Lost 100 Pounds - Huffington Post

After Recovering From A Brain Tumor, Anthony Belfiore Lost 100 Pounds - Huffington Post | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
After Recovering From A Brain Tumor, Anthony Belfiore Lost 100 Pounds
Huffington Post
I gained this weight in 2008 by eating poorly, stress, lack of cardiovascular exercise and also the onset of a pituitary brain tumor, which led to blindness.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

I love seeing examples of people like Anthony who use their illness as a wake-up call to change their lives for the better.

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T-Boz: "Doctors Said I Wouldn't Live Past My 30's"

T-Boz: "Doctors Said I Wouldn't Live Past My 30's" | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Tionne Watkins, better known as T-Boz of the legendary girl group TLC, revealed that she has secretly suffered from complications related to a brain tumor in addition to battling sickle cell anemia...

Via Pacific Cove
Beth A. Williams's insight:

T-Boz proved her doctors wrong -- their gloomy prognosis didn't fit her own story. This article is inspiring and also has some easy-to-understand information about brain tumors. Mine was an oligodendroglioma, and wasn't in the typical location. So grateful for its characteristics being so treatable!

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Pacific Cove's curator insight, February 19, 2015 12:40 PM

#BrainTumorThursday - #BrainCancerAwareness - The 44-year-old star revealed that she has been waging a secret battle against a brain tumor that was diagnosed in 2006, saying that she underwent a seven-hour surgical procedure...  #BrainCancer #BrainTumor #BTSM #Caregivers #Caregiving

Tambre Leighn's curator insight, March 6, 2015 10:49 AM

Cancer doesn't discriminate - Hollywood superstar or a rockstar mother - whether you're an "A-lister" or not, cancer can have a huge impact on your life - either because you've been diagnosed or someone you love is going through it. Sharing of stories like this helps people to know they are not alone.

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Cancer Transitions®

Cancer Transitions® | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Active treatment is done, now what? Join Cancer Transitions to make the transition from treatment to survivorship. http://t.co/1HC9a1Rvw4
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Great resource for information and other resources on wellness, survivorship, creating your own plan of action. 

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Mean girls and scared boys: The real life Australian The Fault in Our Stars ... - NEWS.com.au

Mean girls and scared boys: The real life Australian The Fault in Our Stars ... - NEWS.com.au | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
THERE’S a lot to worry about when you’re 14 and told you’re going to die.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

The issues teenagers with cancer face differ from those that both children and adults face. A place to share with others in similar situations can provide respite and a sense of community, and help to overcome isolation. 

 

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, November 19, 2014 2:22 PM

Exactly why organizations like Young Survival Coalition (http://www.youngsurvival.org/) and Stupid Cancer (http://stupidcancer.org/) are SO important. Registration is open for YSC Conference for young women dealing with breast cancer, March 2015 in Houston and CancerCon hits Denver in April 2015. Both events give young survivors a chance to get connected, educated, inspired, and have some fun in a judgment free environment. Please pass it on.

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College player fights tumor for moment on court - Charlotte Observer

College player fights tumor for moment on court - Charlotte Observer | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Lauren Hill is the last player to take the court for the 6 a.m. stretch before basketball practice. She's moving slowly today.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Lauren Hill reminds us that we can LIVE our lives no matter how much time we have. And who really knows whether our lives will be long or short? Let's make the most of what we have.

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Post cancer treatment is an important phase of cancer care | Bluegrass Moms | Kentucky.com

Post cancer treatment is an important phase of cancer care | Bluegrass Moms | Kentucky.com | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Cancer care doesn't end when treatment for it is over. It is important for all survivors to know that the follow-up care after the completion of cancer treatment is important for their health and may affect their survival.

Via Tambre Leighn
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Given how many survivors there are, with the numbers steadily browning, this will truly be a value-add to our healthcare system in 2015.

more...
Tambre Leighn's curator insight, October 13, 2014 4:37 PM

Not only is it important, it is being mandated for Comprehensive Cancer Treatment Centers by the Commission on Cancer starting in January 2015! Time for a change with more tools and resources invested in survivorship. Quantity of days must also include quality of life!

Beth A. Williams's curator insight, October 14, 2014 6:43 PM

This is so needed! Coming in 2015 will be welcomed.

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Brain cancer treatment with a raw food diet: how it cured one girl! - The Raw Food World News

Brain cancer treatment with a raw food diet: how it cured one girl! - The Raw Food World News | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Here's the incredible story of how one girl cured herself by shunning chemotherapy and used a raw food diet as her brain cancer treatment.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Given how many additives we have in our processed and animal-based food, eliminating all that for organic, plant-based nutrition could provide a natural remedy for any number of ailments. When I was diagnosed with multiple food sensitivities, eliminating all those inflammatory foods also eliminated sinus and digestive tract issues, along with symptoms of arthritis. I say keep an open mind and do what feels right for your body.

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Brain tumor Symptoms - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic

Brain tumor Symptoms - Diseases and Conditions - Mayo Clinic | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Brain tumor — Comprehensive overview covers signs, symptoms and treatments, including surgery.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

This list makes me feel SO fortunate! The only symptoms I had were related to becoming easily confused -- and I thought maybe that was due to "the change" or the aging process! :) If they hadn't already found the glioma years before while looking for something else, the tumor may not have been discovered in time for successful treatment.

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Cannabis oil cures baby of an Inoperable Brain Tumor says Dr.William Courtney cureyourowncancer.org - YouTube

Cannabis oil on pacifier cures babies brain tumor. Medical marijuana is gaining acceptance, but could it even help kids? Dr. William Courtney has seen it hap...
Beth A. Williams's insight:

I don't even know what to say about this story. Whatever you may think about medical marijuana, this example suggests that it can be used to great effect while avoiding the destruction of healthy cells. This gives me hope that perhaps the miracles of modern medicine are on to something big related to brain tumors.

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Winlock student with brain tumor credits cannabis for recent recovery

Winlock student with brain tumor credits cannabis for recent recovery | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Winlock 15-year-old Taylor Rehmeyer has battled an aggressive brain cancer for nearly a decade with chemotherapy and radiation.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Yet another case of thinking and testing things outside the box when all other options have failed.

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TEEN FAKES CHEMO WHILE CURING BRAIN CANCER WITH CANNABIS - The Healist

TEEN FAKES CHEMO WHILE CURING BRAIN CANCER WITH CANNABIS - The Healist | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Teen Alysa Erwin cured her incurable brain cancer with whole plant cannabis extract Simpson Oil, while faking taking her chemo. (RT @HempMedsPx: RT @thehealist: So happy to hear about @RickiLake's new film #WeedThePeople!
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Sometimes it's when all other methods have failed that we find the answers in simple solutions. Keep an open mind to what's possible.

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Courage through cancer: Ready for the next big thing

Courage through cancer: Ready for the next big thing | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
Eric Galvez admits his life is much different now. (RT @PacificCove: #BrainTumorThursday - Courage through cancer: Ready for the next big thing #BrainCancer...
Beth A. Williams's insight:

Eric Galvez, significantly impaired since his bout with a brain tumor, remains as upbeat as ever, and has invested his life in helping others through a non-profit organization that provides in formation and support, as well as public speaking. Living life on his terms. So inspiring to the rest of us.

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Tambre Leighn's curator insight, April 7, 2014 12:15 PM

"We can go through it, or we can GROW through it" ~ Tambre Leighn  Eric is a living embodiment of my quote about how we choose to approach challenges and change in our lives.  What an inspiring story!

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Florida teacher dying of brain cancer sells film rights to Steve Carell

Florida teacher dying of brain cancer sells film rights to Steve Carell | brain tumor survivors | Scoop.it
If there's an upside to dying of brain cancer , Florida teacher David Menasche has not only found it, he has written the book and sold the movie rights.
Beth A. Williams's insight:

This quest David Menasche pursued to find out if he had made a difference, turned out to be so much more than he had imagined. And it probably contributed to his being alive 7 years past his prognosis. 

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