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Killer instinct | COSMOS magazine

Killer instinct | COSMOS magazine | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
COSMOS Online. Advances in neuroscience and technology could lead to the mind becoming the ultimate weapon. Article; Comments 000. The Military Brain. As the sun sets over a desert riddled with enemy fighters, a solitary Special .....

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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:18 AM
Possibilities of futuristic brain tech
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Aerobic exercise can increase brain size and improve cognition in children ... - News-Medical.net

Science Codex
Aerobic exercise can increase brain size and improve cognition in children ...

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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:21 AM
New health research for da brain
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Human brain basically a VHS recorder

Human brain basically a VHS recorder | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
THE most extensive scan of the human brain yet has revealed it is essentially a storage unit for highlights from The A Team.

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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:23 AM
New brain scan results
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New Website to Open World of Neurosciences to Public

New Website to Open World of Neurosciences to Public | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
Which of the following statements are true? We only use 10 percent of our brain. Listening to classical music can make us smarter. Brain damage is permanent. Alcohol kills brain cells. If you've said none of the above, ...

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The Psychology Behind Superhero Origin Stories

The Psychology Behind Superhero Origin Stories | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
How does following the adventures of Spider-Man and Batman inspire us to cope with adversity?

 

This is a great little blog post by Dr. Robin Rosenberg on how superhero stories can inspire us. 


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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:25 AM
Why the brain connects us so well with superheroes
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How Call of Duty Can Be Good For Health

How Call of Duty Can Be Good For Health | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
Violent video games in which players slaughter virtual enemies can actually be good for you, according to a new study that reveals that the games serve as kind of a pain killer as they can boost a person's pain threshold by 65 percent.

 

In a study involving 40 participants, scientists found that people were able to endure pain for 65 percent longer after playing violent "first person shooter" video games than when they played a nonviolent golf game.

 

Researchers at Keele University asked participants to play both the violent and non-violent game on different occasions for 10 minutes. After each game, participants were asked to place one of their hands in ice-cold water to test their pain tolerance.

 

The findings, published in the journal Psychological Reports, showed that on average, participants kept their hands in the icy water for 65 percent longer after playing the violent game, suggesting that playing the game boosted the participants' pain tolerance. Researchers noted that after playing the violent video games, participants' heart rate also increased.

 

The team says that the latest findings suggest that the higher pain tolerance and increased heart rate could be attributed to the body's natural 'fight or flight' response to stress, which can activate descending pain inhibitory pathways in the brain and reduce sensitivity to pain.

 

The latest study follows a previous study, also done by the same researchers at Keele University, which revealed that swearing increases people's tolerance for pain.


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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:27 AM
Mental perception changes through video games
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Virtual Superheroes: Using Superpowers in Virtual Reality to Encourage Prosocial Behavior

Virtual Superheroes: Using Superpowers in Virtual Reality to Encourage Prosocial Behavior | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it

Check out this research artilcle that looks at how having a superpower in a virtual setting can have implications on behavior. The article's conclusion states: 

The results indicate that having the “superpower” of flight leads to greater helping behavior in the real world, regardless of how participants used that power. A possible mechanism for this result is that having the power of flight primed concepts and prototypes associated with superheroes (e.g., Superman). This research illustrates the potential of using experiences in virtual reality technology to increase prosocial behavior in the physical world.


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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:27 AM
Supernatural traits in game cause a helping attitude
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5 More Reasons Video Games Are Actually Good for You

5 More Reasons Video Games Are Actually Good for You | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it

This is a follow-up article to a previous piece titled "5 Reasons Video Games Are Actuallly Good for You." The topics and research covered in this article are: Kids Who Play Video Games Are More Creative, Girls Who Play Video Games with Dad are Happier, Video Games Are Better Than Watching TV, Video Games Can Help the Elderly Avoid Serious Falls, and Co-op Gamers Are Less Aggressive.


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Neural 'connectomics' game unveiled : Nature News Blog

Neural 'connectomics' game unveiled : Nature News Blog | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
Just in time for the holidays, a team of MIT and Max Planck researchers has released EyeWire: an online game that allows users to trace neural connections through the retina. Read more.

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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:18 AM
Brain to eyesight connections
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How Seeing Changes Your Brain - Forbes

How Seeing Changes Your Brain - Forbes | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
How Seeing Changes Your Brain
Forbes
Your eyes aren't just advanced visual systems capturing images of what's around you.

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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:19 AM
Affect of retinas on brain comprehension
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Evolving neural networks for robot locomotion « Bot Scene

Evolving neural networks for robot locomotion « Bot Scene | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
News & Views on Humanoid Robotics (by Joe Strout)

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New data on attention and visual perception - News-Medical.net

New data on attention and visual perception - News-Medical.net | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
New data on attention and visual perception
News-Medical.net
The journal PLOS ONE has recently published a study which provides new data around attention and visual perception.

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Games to Sharpen the Brain

Games to Sharpen the Brain | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
If two start-ups have their way, videogames might cure more than just boredom. They could also be used to treat attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder.


Akili Interactive Labs Inc. of Boston, formed by start-up-creating firm PureTech Ventures, and San Francisco company Brain Plasticity Inc. are seeking Food and Drug Administration approval for a videogame treatment they hope clinicians will turn to before prescribing medicines for ADHD.


The disorder, whose symptoms include difficulty paying attention and remaining focused, affects 9% of adolescents and 4.1% of adults in the U.S., according to the American Psychiatric Association.


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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:24 AM
New disease therapy methods for add
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iPad game hopes to stop HIV transmission

iPad game hopes to stop HIV transmission | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
Play a sedentary video game and live a healthier life? That’s the hope of Yale researchers who are joining the booming health games industry with an iPad application designed to help minority teens learn about HIV prevention strategies.

 

As part of Yale’s Play2Prevent initiative, a group from the School of Medicine conducted focus groups with New Haven teens to gain an understanding common factors and behaviors that affect HIV risk. The findings are guiding the design and content of a new iPad game titled PlayForward: Elm City Stories, which aims to promote better decisions among minority youth. The researchers will conduct a study on the game’s impact HIV transmission rates starting later this year.

 

“The overall goal is to help kids practice skills in the game that will decrease their engagement in behaviors that put them at risk for HIV,” said brief author Lynn Fiellin MED ’96, associate professor of medicine and director of Play2Prevent. “The idea is to build an evidence-based HIV intervention. The game has to be fun and engaging, but it has to accomplish something.”

 

The game involves creating an avatar who goes through a virtual life and makes decisions revolving around risk behaviors, including unprotected sex and drug and alcohol abuse. The player will be able to see how their choices and actions influence later situations and rewind to play out how making another decision could produce a different outcome. Researchers will study the impact of the game among New Haven teens in an 18-24 month clinical trial starting later this year.


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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
"Brainwashing" kids to make better choices
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Game-Like Therapy Helps Kids with ADHD Without Drugs

Game-Like Therapy Helps Kids with ADHD Without Drugs | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
It looks like a noisy video game, but it’s actually a new ADHD therapy that is helping 11-year-old Adam Solomon train his brain.

 

Adam was in danger of having to go on ADHD (Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) medication. His family didn’t want that to happen, but his mother Diane Solomon said Adam’s condition was going from bad to worse.

 

Desperate, they tried something different: an innovative treatment from Camarillo-based Hardy Brain Training called Interactive Metronome.

 

The program tries to improve that brain timing and rhythm through a computer program. Patients hear a tone and have to clap their hands or tap their foot to match the beat. The screen gives instant feedback on how well they are keeping up. As their coordination improves, so does their concentration.

 

Adam’s parents say he showed a remarkable difference after he trained on the program for a summer, and they were able to streamline him into a regular classroom for the first time in his life.

After a few more years of training, he tested into the gifted program at Johns Hopkins University.


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Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
Video games used as medical treatment
Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
Video games used as medical treatment
Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:30 AM
Video games used as medical treatment
Rescooped by Stephen Aloysius Balas from Geek Therapy
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The Psychology Behind Superhero Origin Stories

The Psychology Behind Superhero Origin Stories | Brain research, therapy, and the like | Scoop.it
How does following the adventures of Spider-Man and Batman inspire us to cope with adversity?

 

This is a great little blog post by Dr. Robin Rosenberg on how superhero stories can inspire us. 


Via Josué Cardona
more...
Stephen Aloysius Balas's comment, February 25, 2013 10:25 AM
Why the brain connects us so well with superheroes