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Brain-based learning
Neuroscience and cognitive psychology research about learning and memory
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Learning with all the senses: Movement, images facilitate vocabulary learning

Learning with all the senses: Movement, images facilitate vocabulary learning | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
"Atesi" -- what sounds like a word from the Elven language of Lord of the Rings is actually a Vimmish word meaning "thought". Scientists have used Vimmish, an artificial language specifically developed for scientific research, to study how people can best memorize foreign-language terms. According to the researchers, it is easier to learn vocabulary if the brain can link a given word with different sensory perceptions.
Katherine Stevens's insight:

Interesting finding that using your hands and gesturing when learning a new language helps the person remember the words later.

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How to Easily Improve Your Memory - PsyBlog

How to Easily Improve Your Memory - PsyBlog | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
10 surprising and mostly easy ways to improve your memory.
Katherine Stevens's insight:

Some of these tips were surprising, like clenching your fist, chewing gum, reading Facebook posts, and smelling rosemary. (All the tips are based on research.)

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Little Kids Quickly Learn to Judge a Face

Little Kids Quickly Learn to Judge a Face | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
A Harvard study reveals that, like adults, children make snap decisions about people based on their facial features.
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Terri P's curator insight, April 9, 2014 12:00 PM

Adults make judgments every minute of every day regarding what some new person can offer them. Persons of color are not the only marginalized groups. Unattractive people are regularly overlooked, ignored, treated with derision, and sometimes, out right hatred. The sidelong looks and eye rolls are never lost on those who are mistreated. It should be the leaders of classrooms and gatherings who monitor this and stop it from happening. Being a part of the unattractive group means no one represents you, no one stands up for you. Mistreatment of these people is proven to be acceptable in social settings, but it is not acceptable. Judgments need to be withheld until a person is known.   

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The Science of How Your Mind-Wandering Is Robbing You of Happiness

The Science of How Your Mind-Wandering Is Robbing You of Happiness | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
Why the secret of life remains in the living.

"The main thing is to get what little happiness there is out of life in this wartorn world,
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JulieLaRoche's comment, April 11, 2014 12:18 AM
I originally heard this social scientist interviewed on NPR. Fascinating!
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The Trouble With Background Noise

The Trouble With Background Noise | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

Does hearing a TV in the background make difference in how well you learn? It can.

 

From the article: "Everyday background noise, whether it is a neighbor's television or passing aircraft, can have a disruptive effect on people's cognitive learning and unconscious physiological processes, says a study in the International Journal of Hygiene and Environmental Health."

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Neuro Myths: Separating Fact and Fiction in Brain-Based Learning

Neuro Myths: Separating Fact and Fiction in Brain-Based Learning | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

Some of the key myths:

* Some people are left-brained and some are right-brained

* Male and female brains are radically different

* We use only 10 percent of our brains

 

Be wary of product claims that they are proven by brain research. From the article: "Neuroimaging technologies have really only developed over the last 20 years, so virtually nothing is 'proven' at this point."

 

 

 

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Tena Smith Fulghum's curator insight, April 30, 2014 6:01 AM

Brain myths are prevalent in teaching circles. Great article. 

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Your brain lies to you - The New York Times

Your brain lies to you - The New York Times | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

"Facts are stored first in the hippocampus, a structure deep in the brain ... Every time we recall it, our brain writes it down again, and during this re-storage, it is also reprocessed. In time, the fact is gradually transferred to the cerebral cortex and is separated from the context in which it was originally learned. ..."

"This phenomenon, known as source amnesia, can also lead people to forget whether a statement is true. Even when a lie is presented with a disclaimer, people often later remember it as true."

"With time, this misremembering gets worse. A false statement from a noncredible source that is at first not believed can gain credibility during the months it takes to reprocess memories from short-term hippocampal storage to longer-term cortical storage. As the source is forgotten, the message and its implications gain strength."

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Catherine Govender's curator insight, June 17, 2013 7:25 AM

I think this is a wonderful - yet frightening - explanation of how we can sometimes fool ourselves. 

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The Neurology of Gaming

The Neurology of Gaming | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

Are you using games to teach?

 

Here's an infographic about the impact - both positive and negative - that videos games have on the brain.

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Tamra Dollar's curator insight, July 20, 2013 7:21 PM

Gamed based learning is a powerful tool for teaching! As a data nerd, I have seen first hand the achievement scores of students who game vs. don't game. This is not a scientific study, but is based on seeing scores skyrocket from students who are accused of "doing nothing" in school and yet are avid gamers. Hmmm.

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How to Be a Better Test-Taker

How to Be a Better Test-Taker | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
Don’t choke on those final exams. Tips to free up working memory when you’re caught in the grips of test anxiety.
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Audrey's comment, August 1, 2013 8:29 AM
Use games to help learning
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Talking to Yourself Can Give You a Temporary Cognitive Boost

Talking to Yourself Can Give You a Temporary Cognitive Boost | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
Talking to yourself has long been frowned upon as a sign of craziness, but a recent study published in the Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology suggests talking to yourself might actually help you find lost or hidden objects more quickly...
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Brain-Sight: Can touch allow us to “see” better than sight? | Brain World

Brain-Sight: Can touch allow us to “see” better than sight? | Brain World | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

Which of the following procedures do you think would produce the most accurate representation of an object: tracing the object; looking at the object while drawing it; or, with your eyes closed, touching and feeling the object and then drawing it, without having ever seen it?

 

Most educators and parents would insist that the range in the quality of the three renditions would match the order in which they are presented.

 

And they would be wrong.

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The Neuroscience of Your Brain on Fiction

Stories stimulate the brain. Metaphors like “He had leathery hands” rouse the sensory cortex.

 

"Brain scans are revealing what happens in our heads when we read a detailed description, an evocative metaphor or an emotional exchange between characters. Stories, this research is showing, stimulate the brain and even change how we act in life. ... The brain, it seems, does not make much of a distinction between reading about an experience and encountering it in real life; in each case, the same neurological regions are stimulated."

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Cindy Tam's comment, June 10, 2012 12:36 AM
Curious. Do you know if there is the same effect from film or oral story-telling?
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Trouble Coping with the Unfamiliar as You Age? Blame Your White Matter

A brain-mapping study has found that people's ability to make decisions in novel situations decreases with age and is associated with a reduction in the integrity of two specific white-matter pathways.
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How Typing Is Destroying Your Memory

How Typing Is Destroying Your Memory | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
Studies show that you're more likely to remember things that you write down, but there are circumstances where you should grab your laptop.
Katherine Stevens's insight:

We often tend to think that it's faster and better to take notes on a computer. But we may remember more if we take handwritten notes.

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Tested: Whether People Think Better on Their Feet or Seated - PsyBlog

Tested: Whether People Think Better on Their Feet or Seated - PsyBlog | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
Do people really think better on their feet?
Katherine Stevens's insight:

Standing desks are just for adults. This study of 7- and 10-years-old found "that those using the standing desk were more likely to: 
* Raise their hand. 
* Play a part in classroom discussions. 
* Answer a question. 
* Avoid talking out of turn"

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Rescooped by Katherine Stevens from Cognitive Neuroscience
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The Brain Science Behind Gut Decisions

The Brain Science Behind Gut Decisions | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
What parts of the brain are activated when we make a gut decision?Dr. Dan Siegel, clinical professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine, explained the complex process of how our minds and

Via Sandeep Gautam
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Rescooped by Katherine Stevens from 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience
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Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask?

Can the Brain be Trained to Better Multitask? | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

The first role of trained infotention is to recognize whether or not  multitasking, single-minded focus,  or alert but diffused attention is the most appropriate mind-tool for the task at hand. However, for those many situations in which multitasking is either necessary or preferable or both, the most important question is whether -- and to what degree -- multitasking more effectively is a learnable skill. -- Howard 

 

"Results showed that participants did much better at multitasking after training. Interestingly the benefits transferred to the untrained dual task. Brain training can thus be used to get better at multitasking!"


Via Howard Rheingold, Tom Perran
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Jenna Becerra's curator insight, February 20, 2013 1:52 AM

Before one can think about multitasking, it is important to take into account that it is more than just practice. One has to be metacognitive in his or her approach to learning and paying attention to what is important. Know individual tendencies, but also know that a mind can be trained. Multitasking is not always the right approach, but it is often inevitable. Training one's mind to multitask effectively will only result in efficiency.

Anne Macdonell's curator insight, May 14, 2013 8:28 AM

Can't the brain be trained in every task? Why not multitasking as well?

Audrey's comment, May 16, 2013 6:37 AM
Yes. Agree.
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Using Just 10% of Your Brain? Think Again

Using Just 10% of Your Brain? Think Again | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

Can you spot the "neuromyths"? 
From the article: "Which of these statements is false?

1. We use only 10% of our brain.

2. Environments rich in stimuli improve the brains of preschool children.

3. Individuals learn better when they receive information in their preferred learning style, whether auditory, visual or kinesthetic."

 

"All three statements are false—or at least not substantiated by scientific evidence. Unfortunately, if you got any of them wrong, you're hardly alone."

 

"These 'neuromyths,' along with others, were presented to 242 primary and secondary school teachers in the Netherlands and the U.K. as part of a study by Sanne Dekker and colleagues at VU University Amsterdam and Bristol University, and just published in the journal Frontiers in Psychology."

 

"...47% of the teachers believed the 10% myth. Even more, 76%, believed that enriching children's environments will strengthen their brains. "The myth about learning styles was the most popular: 94% of the teachers believed that students perform better when lessons are delivered in their preferred learning style" 

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Rescooped by Katherine Stevens from How learning happens
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Learnlets » The third goal of learning

Learnlets » The third goal of learning | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

"Formally, our goals for learning interventions should be retention over time until needed and transfer to all appropriate situations (and no inappropriate ones). And these are important goals."  A third goal is also important - learner confidence. It's a "desirable, maybe even necessary outcome of any really successful learning."


Via IdeaLearning Group
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Rescooped by Katherine Stevens from How learning happens
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edWeb.net: 5 Myths About Learning: What Neuroscience Tells Us

edWeb.net: 5 Myths About Learning: What Neuroscience Tells Us | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
5 Myths About Learning: What Neuroscience Tells Us. Presented by Sam Wang, Associate Professor at Princeton University, Neuroscientist and Author Sponsored by the USC Rossier School of Education ...

Via IdeaLearning Group
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Rescooped by Katherine Stevens from eLearning, Learning and Informal Learning
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Why Floundering Makes Learning Better | TIME.com

Why Floundering Makes Learning Better | TIME.com | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
Call it the "learning paradox": the more you struggle and even fail while you're trying to master new information, the better you're likely to recall and apply that information later.

 

"The learning paradox is at the heart of 'productive failure,' a phenomenon identified by Manu Kapur. ... Kapur points out that while the model adopted by many teachers and employers when introducing others to new knowledge — providing lots of structure and guidance early on, until the students or workers show that they can do it on their own — makes intuitive sense, it may not be the best way to promote learning. Rather, it’s better to let the neophytes wrestle with the material on their own for a while, refraining from giving them any assistance at the start."

 

Article by Annie Murphy Paul in Time Magazine.

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How Exercise Could Lead to a Better Brain | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience

How Exercise Could Lead to a Better Brain | 21st Century Concepts- Educational Neuroscience | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it
A mouse that runs all the time is smarter than one that doesn’t. Probably true for people, too.
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Attention Alert: A Study on Distraction Reveals Some Surprises | Psychology Today

Attention Alert: A Study on Distraction Reveals Some Surprises | Psychology Today | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

How long were students able to focus on something important in their natural environment?

"... students were only able to focus and stay on task for an average of three minutes at a time and nearly all of their distractions" were interruptions from their smartphone and their laptop .  

 

"One additional result stunned us: If they checked Facebook just once during the 15-minute study period they were worse students. It didn’t matter how many times they looked at Facebook; once was enough."

 

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When Gaming Is Good for You

When Gaming Is Good for You | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

Videogames can change a person's brain and, as researchers are finding, often that change is for the better.

 

A growing body of university research suggests that gaming improves creativity, decision-making and perception. The specific benefits are wide ranging, from improved hand-eye coordination in surgeons to vision changes that boost night driving ability.

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Dominic Wlliams's curator insight, March 15, 2013 9:51 AM

The most important thing about this article is that research suggests that playing video games improves creativity, decision-making and perception

donald william riden's comment, March 18, 2013 10:09 AM
that is very true dominic
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Are Some Brains Better at Learning Languages? : Discovery News

Are Some Brains Better at Learning Languages? : Discovery News | Brain-based learning | Scoop.it

Is there something unique about certain brains, which allows some people to speak and understand so many more languages than the rest of us?

The answer, experts say, seems to be yes, no and it's complicated.

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