Bradley's A Midsummer Night's Dream
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Resource

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EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Bradley Shatraw's insight:

The Book of Theseus is one of the resources used to actually write A Midsummer Night's Dream. Shakespeare's writing of this plays was sometimes off of other novels written in his day. He used them to make his play even more interesting or complicated than they already were. He thought that if he made his plays more comlicated, people would have to focus in on the play more. He also figured that if he made his plays from other books people that had read those books would be able to connect even more to the play.

Cottrell, Alan. "The Book Of Theseus." Masterplots, Fourth Edition (2010): 1-4. Literary Reference Center. Web. 3 Mar. 2013.

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Image

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A Midsummer Night's Dream Hermia And The Fairies Painting by John Simmons - A Midsummer Night's Dream Hermia And The Fairies Fine Art Prints and Posters for Sale
Bradley Shatraw's insight:

This photo shows Hermia and the fairies. It shows what Hermia looks like, which helps me a lot when trying to analyze the type of character she is. It also shows how many people look up to her, because the fairies surround her and she is looking down at them. She is in a position of confidence, which also shows that she is a confident women. This picture of Hermia showed me more than I could have imagined.

Simmons, John. Hermia and the Fairies. Madison, Wisconsin: John Simmons, 2004. Print.

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Historical Article

Historical Article | Bradley's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Bradley Shatraw's insight:

This article shows the history of Shakespearean language. It informs us of why it is different from modern day language, but also of how it is very much the same. Sometimes something said by a character looks like today's language, but does not mean nearly the same thing. For example, "Where art thou Romeo," does not mean "Where is Romeo?" In that time it meant "who is this Romeo," as in who is this man, what is his background and such. When you first see someone in life, you make ask someone "Who is that?" The same thing is meant by "Where art thou Romeo?" Shakespearean language made complete sense to the people of the Elizabethan Age, because they spoke the same way. This article showed me how to read the language of Shakespeare, but it also gave me background knowledge of why things meant certain things, or what statements people found funny at the time. When I read Shakespeare's plays, sometimes I come across a part that is supposed to be funny, but I don't even notice it because I'm not comprehending the langage well. People that watched these plays would be on the floor laughing but I just think its just another line. This article allowed me to gain a lot more knowledge about Shakespearean language and I will now understand the play "A Midsummer Night's Dream" much better, because I will be able to understand the meaning of the language.

 

Riley, Dick, and Pam McAllister. "So Near And Yet So Far--Shakespeare's Language." Bedside, Bathtub & Armchair Companion to Shakespeare. 135-141. n.p.: Continuum International Publishing Group Ltd / Books, 2001. Literary Reference Center. Web. 6 Feb. 2013

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Ben Stone's comment, February 12, 2013 11:59 AM
Great job Brad!
Andrew Matulaitis's comment, March 12, 2013 3:58 PM
I agree with Ben! Your insight is very moving. It really gave a good summary of the article.
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Literary Criticism

Literary Criticism | Bradley's A Midsummer Night's Dream | Scoop.it
EBSCOhost (ebscohost.com) serves thousands of libraries and other institutions with premium content in every subject area. Free LISTA: LibraryResearch.com
Bradley Shatraw's insight:

This lit crit of A Midsummer Night's Dream is judging on how William Shakespeare'simages illuminated his plays. It tells us how brilliant William Shakespeare was and how he made the audience feel like they were in the show. It made them get so interested in the show that even because his actors had to play the role of girl's it didn't matter. It gives specific examples of how Shakespeare makes people imagine they're ina another world. It makes them feel connected to the play. They get so into it that the play becomes part of their own life for just a little while.

Shakespeare, William. "A Midsummer Night's Dream." Kirkus Reviews 76.10 (2008): 193. Library, Information Science & Technology Abstracts. Web. 3 Mar. 2013.

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Ian Pascoe's comment, March 10, 2013 8:18 PM
I think it would. It can help students get interested in the subject by reacting to plays themselves, like we did in our class!
Bradley Shatraw's comment, March 11, 2013 8:07 PM
Hey Matches.. Good one..
Ben Stone's comment, March 12, 2013 7:01 PM
I think it could anyone who wants to read a Shakespearean play because it gave a lot of helpful insight.
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Video

© MMV Disney Enterprises, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
Bradley Shatraw's insight:

This episode of The Suite Life of Zack and Cody shows how confusing the love tree is. Every single person in the play is supposed to love someone, but in reality they love someone else. Even supporting roles have affairs or are secretly in love with someone they arn't supposed to be with. This episode shows how in modern day life that can still happen. The kids in the play got so into the play that their love life's got messed up too. Zack is Lysander, and is going to kiss Gwenn who is Hermia, but in real life he actually likes Venessa who is playing Helena. Cody is the one who likes Gwenn, but Gwenn is going to kiss Zack which is a problem. Just by the two twins love trees, the story is already confusing. It is the same thing in A Midsummer Night's Dream, because everyone is with the opposite of who they should be with. The play becomes more and more confusing as it continues, because there are more and more messed up relationships to remember.

Zack & Cody. A Midsummer Nightmare. YouTube. MMV Enterprises, September 7, 2012. Print. 

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Julia Cloutier's comment, March 5, 2013 2:53 PM
Have you ever had a love tree or an even that you can relate to this episode of Zach and Cody?
Bradley Shatraw's comment, March 11, 2013 8:06 PM
Oh of course..
Bradley Shatraw's comment, March 11, 2013 8:07 PM
Happens on a regular basis..