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Exploring Time Lapse Films with the X-E1 | David Cleland

Exploring Time Lapse Films with the X-E1 | David Cleland | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it


There is a growing trend amongst digital photographers to use their digital SLR cameras to capture stunning high definition time-lapse films. I thought I would start to explore the process using my X-E1 camera but I would stress this post is not a presentation of work, the film at the top of the post is merely my first and very rough experiment. This post documents my first attempt to capture a time-lapse video and process the images in Lightroom 4 to create a high definition time-lapse film.

 

Additional Hardware

 

If you want to explore this technique then in addition to a camera and tripod you are going to need an intervalometer. An intervalometer is a piece of hardware that all trigger your camera at a preset time interval. These range in price from around £15 through to over £100 if you opt for a wireless system. I have purchases the cheapest intervalometers I could find.

Intervalometer – X-E1

The X-E1 features a mic/release connector. I tested a canon remote release cable with the X-E1 and it triggered so I took a risk and purchased an intervalometer with the same Canon interface. This unit cost £19 and works perfectly.

Shooting the time-lapse....


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QMA Attenuators by Field Components

QMA Attenuators by Field Components | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it

QMA Male to Female Attenuator provided by Field Components, has specific features like: DC-3.0 GHz, 2 Watts, 2 dB, Tri-Alloy Plating, VSWR Brass Material and more with best price. Field Components delivers it's quality products as quick as possible to you.

 

 

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GA: Avalon hopes to attract tenants with Gigabit Internet access. | Atlanta Business Chronicle

GA: Avalon hopes to attract tenants with Gigabit Internet access. | Atlanta Business Chronicle | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it

In a world that lives in the "cloud", high-speed Internet access is a potent weapon to win new business. Avalon, a $600 million mixed-used developmentplanned in Alpharetta, is doing just that.

 

The developer of the 86-acre center said it will be the first such development in Georgia to deliver "Gigabit Internet," ultra-fast Internet access via fiber optic cable.

 

The technology, known as FTTP (fiber-to-the-premise), provides Internet access by running fiber optic cable from an Internet Service Provider to the home or business.

 

Fiber optic cables signals are sent via pulses of light rather than electricity. Therefore, data can be sent extremely quickly with little deterioration. FTTP delivers Internet speeds of between 10Mbps and 300 Mbps. Internet speeds via coaxial cable connection, in comparison, typically ranges between 1Mbps and 6Mbps.

 

Super fast Internet access will help market Avalon to tech and digital media companies companies who need to transfer large files electronically and stream high definition video and audio.

 

The Internet is the “oxygen” for virtually every business, said Mark Toro, managing partner at North American Properties the developer behind Avalon.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Broadband: Public Officials Want More Government Participation | Governing.com

Broadband: Public Officials Want More Government Participation | Governing.com | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it

First there was dial up. Then came something called DSL. Followed by coaxial cable broadband. Now, it's all about fiber. A fiber-optic network can be 200 times faster than cable and has the potential to trigger a new generation of economic development. So, it should come as no surprise than that 69 percent of public officials cite economic factors as the top reason why cities need to have fiber.

 

This, according to a new survey conducted online in July by the Governing Exchange, the research arm of Governing. More than 125 senior managers in state and local government were polled, and about 70 percent said they believe fiber networks should be considered a public good that government regulates and sometimes runs, similar to water, sewer and other utility services.

 

Fiber networks are seen by many as one of the most important infrastructure developments of the 21st century. Hair-thin glass fibers can deliver voice, data and video in quantities and speeds that are considered transformative by experts. But how does this next generation Internet superhighway get built and who builds it?


It certainly won't be the major cable TV and telecom providers, critics say. They own most of today's broadband networks, which reach 89 percent of Americans. There's no incentive, critics say, for them to embrace fiber.

 

But demand for next generation fiber is rising and our survey found that 59 percent of public officials believe government should play an active role in the deployment of fiber networks. But that interest doesn't translate into action either. Only 24 percent of the respondents said they have either an active plan, proposal or are considering implementation of a publicly-owned fiber network in their community.

 

Currently, 150 cities and towns have their own, municipally run broadband network, either cable or fiber. The one big stand out is Chattanooga, Tenn., which is America's largest city with a municipally owned fiber network available to residents and businesses. The city's utility, EPB, launched fiber broadband in 2012 as part of a broad economic development strategy that would also provide the city government with innovative capabilities in delivering better services for public safety, transportation, public works and education.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Attenuators | Coax Attenuators | Coaxial Attenuators | RF Attenuators | Bracke Manufacturing

Attenuators | Coax Attenuators | Coaxial Attenuators | RF Attenuators | Bracke Manufacturing | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Bracke Manufacturing supplies coaxial attenuators manufactured with either machined brass connectors or passivated stainless steel versions.
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Attenuators Bracke Manufacturing - RF and Microwave Components and Assemblies Bracke Online, Attenuators

Attenuators Bracke Manufacturing - RF and Microwave Components and Assemblies Bracke Online, Attenuators | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Attenuators - Bracke Manufacturing carries a large selection of Attenuators.
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Raisbeck Aviation's Julie Burr honored with Woman in Aerospace Award - The B-Town Blog (blog)

Raisbeck Aviation's Julie Burr honored with Woman in Aerospace Award - The B-Town Blog (blog) | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
The B-Town Blog (blog) Raisbeck Aviation's Julie Burr honored with Woman in Aerospace Award The B-Town Blog (blog) Raisbeck Aviation High School (RAHS) teacher Julie Burr is being honored with a prestigious national award for her dedication to...
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Aerospace museum's boss is an aviation pioneer in her own right - Plain Dealer

Aerospace museum's boss is an aviation pioneer in her own right - Plain Dealer | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Aerospace museum's boss is an aviation pioneer in her own right
Plain Dealer
Aerospace museum's boss is an aviation pioneer in her own right. BWILLIAMS.JPG.
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CSF Appeals for Support for Armadillo Aerospace and Others | NASA Watch

"The Suborbital Applications Researchers Group (SARG) of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation notes John Carmack's August 2, 2013 statement regarding the hibernation of rocket development at Armadillo Aerospace. The STIG rocket appeals to researchers by providing many of the advantages characteristic of next-generation suborbital vehicles including a gentle lift-off, pressurized payload bay, late payload access before launch, rapid payload access after landing, and a lower cost than traditional sounding rockets. Armadillo's success to date, including domestic and international payloads lofted and safely recovered on several mission development flights and a flight to 95km memorably captured on video, highlights how close their hard work has brought them to achieving an important operational research capability eagerly awaited by many scientists. The researchers of SARG encourage Armadillo and all of the new suborbital companies in their pursuit of success with investors and vehicles."


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The Two Moons of Mars Pass in the Martian Night | NASA JPL Space Science HD

The Martian moon Phobos passes in front of Deimos, as viewed by the Curiosity rover. Phobos is the larger of ...


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NASA planners switch next SpaceX Dragon mission to 2014 | NASASpaceFlight.com

NASA planners switch next SpaceX Dragon mission to 2014 | NASASpaceFlight.com | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it

Planners within the ISS program have manifested the next two Commercial Resupply Services (CRS) missions. Both Orbital’s CRS-1 (ORB-1) and SpaceX’s CRS-3 (SpX-3) missions were initially provided with the same orbital place-holder in December, prior to this week’s decision to allow Cygnus to fly ahead of Dragon, with the latter moving to NET January 17, 2014.

 

The Orbital/SpaceX CRS tag team are a requirement element for helping the International Space Station (ISS) cope with the loss of the Space Shuttle’s superior upmass capability.

 

Cygnus is currently preparing for its first trip to the orbital outpost, via its ORB-D mission that will complete numerous test objectives, not unlike those undertaken by Dragon during its COTS 2+ opening flight to the Station.

 

 


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Arrow Collects 154000 Pounds of Used Electronics at Mile High Electronics ... - DailyFinance

Arrow Collects 154000 Pounds of Used Electronics at Mile High Electronics ... - DailyFinance | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Arrow Collects 154000 Pounds of Used Electronics at Mile High Electronics ...
DailyFinance
ENGLEWOOD, Colo.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- Approximately 1,300 Colorado residents recycled more than 154,000 pounds of electronic devices on Sunday, Aug.
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Number of the Week: 1-in-5 Electronics Sales Are Online - Wall Street Journal (blog)

Number of the Week: 1-in-5 Electronics Sales Are Online - Wall Street Journal (blog) | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Wall Street Journal (blog)
Number of the Week: 1-in-5 Electronics Sales Are Online
Wall Street Journal (blog)
This year hasn't been particularly kind to retailers who sell electronics and appliances.
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An adaptor from translational to transcriptional control enables predictable assembly of complex regulation

An adaptor from translational to transcriptional control enables predictable assembly of complex regulation | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it

Chang C Liu,Lei Qi,Julius B Lucks,Thomas H Segall-Shapiro,Denise Wang,Vivek K Mutalik& Adam P Arkin

 

Nature Methods9,1088–1094(2012)doi:10.1038/nmeth.2184

 

Abstract:

 

Bacterial regulators of transcriptional elongation are versatile units for building custom genetic switches, as they control the expression of both coding and noncoding RNAs, act on multigene operons and can be predictably tethered into higher-order regulatory functions (a property called composability). Yet the less versatile bacterial regulators of translational initiation are substantially easier to engineer. To bypass this tradeoff, we have developed an adaptor that converts regulators of translational initiation into regulators of transcriptional elongation in Escherichia coli. We applied this adaptor to the construction of several transcriptional attenuators and activators, including a small molecule–triggered attenuator and a group of five mutually orthogonal riboregulators that we assembled into NOR gates of two, three or four RNA inputs. Continued application of our adaptor should produce large collections of transcriptional regulators whose inherent composability can facilitate the predictable engineering of complex synthetic circuits.

 

http://www.nature.com/nmeth/journal/v9/n11/full/nmeth.2184.html?WT.ec_id=NMETH-201211

 


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A welcome predictability | News | R&D Magazine

A welcome predictability | News | R&D Magazine | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
*An adaptor from translational to transcriptional control enables predictable assembly of complex regulation*

by
Chang C Liu, Lei Qi, Julius B Lucks, Thomas H Segall-Shapiro, Denise Wang, Vivek K Mutalik & Adam P Arkin

"Bacterial regulators of transcriptional elongation are versatile units for building custom genetic switches, as they control the expression of both coding and noncoding RNAs, act on multigene operons and can be predictably tethered into higher-order regulatory functions (a property called composability). Yet the less versatile bacterial regulators of translational initiation are substantially easier to engineer. To bypass this tradeoff, we have developed an adaptor that converts regulators of translational initiation into regulators of transcriptional elongation in Escherichia coli. We applied this adaptor to the construction of several transcriptional attenuators and activators, including a small molecule–triggered attenuator and a group of five mutually orthogonal riboregulators that we assembled into NOR gates of two, three or four RNA inputs. Continued application of our adaptor should produce large collections of transcriptional regulators whose inherent composability can facilitate the predictable engineering of complex synthetic circuits."
http://bit.ly/R7I4QX

Comment:
*A welcome predictability*
Synthetic biology is the latest and most advanced phase of genetic engineering, holding great promise for helping to solve some of the world's most intractable problems, including the sustainable production of energy fuels and critical medical drugs, and the safe removal of toxic and radioactive waste from the environment. However, for synthetic biology to reach its promise, the design and construction of biological systems must be as predictable as the assembly of computer hardware.

An important step towards attaining a higher degree of predictability in synthetic biology has been taken by a group of researchers with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) under the leadership of computational biologist Adam Arkin. Arkin and his team have developed an "adaptor" that makes the genetic engineering of microbial components substantially easier and more predictable by converting regulators of translation into regulators of transcription in Escherichia coli. Transcription and translation make up the two-step process by which the coded instructions of genes are used to synthesize proteins.

"Application of our adaptor should produce large collections of transcriptional regulators whose inherent composability can facilitate the predictable engineering of complex biological circuits in microorganisms," Arkin says. "This in turn should allow for safer and more efficient constructions of increasingly complex functions in microorganisms."
....."
http://bit.ly/TmJpoG


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Another step toward quantum computers: Using photons for memory

Another step toward quantum computers: Using photons for memory | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it

Like regular (classical) computers, quantum computers must be able to receive, store, and manipulate information in order to perform calculations. But the fragile nature of quantum information—which exists as a "0" or "1" or both simultaneously—poses challenges. In research published March 14 in the journal Nature, Yale physicists report an advance in developing memory mechanisms. The advance involves photons, the smallest units of microwave signals, which can serve as a quantum computer's memory, like the RAM of a regular computer. Photons can carry and hold quantum information for a long time, because they interact weakly with the media they typically travel through—coaxial cables, wires, or air, for example. The weakness of these interactions prevents the photons from being absorbed by the medium and preserves the quantum information, once it's been encoded.


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Roger Ellman's curator insight, March 30, 2013 8:04 AM

Many new staircases-of-discovery are being climbed. Good progress.

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UHD-SDI Reclocker targets for 4K broadcast video systems.

UHD-SDI Reclocker targets for 4K broadcast video systems. | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it


Texas Instruments today announced the industry's first 12G ultra-high-definition (UHD) serial digital interface (SDI) reclocker with integrated signal conditioning.

The four-channel LMH1256 doubles the transmission rate of competing 6G devices, allowing broadcast video equipment to capture, record and play back 4K video signals at 60 Hz over a single link of coaxial cable.

The LMH1256 reclocker addresses next-generation systems, including digital video routers, switches, encoders/decoders, modular cards, multi-viewers and display monitors.


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Coaxial Cables | Coax Cables | Bulk Cables | Bracke Manufacturing

Coaxial Cables | Coax Cables | Bulk Cables | Bracke Manufacturing | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Coaxial Cables are engineered for the most demanding applications to offer the highest-in-class performance. All our Coaxial Cables are RoHS an REACH compliant.
Nicole Bracke's insight:

Bracke Manufacturing cables and cable assemblies incorporate the latest materials science to meet the most rigorous electrical, mechanical, and environmental requirements.

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Penn State Named Top Aerospace Talent Supplier

Penn State Named Top Aerospace Talent Supplier | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Penn State was named a top supplier of workers and a valued alma mater in Aviation Week & Space Technology. (.@aviationweek recently named Penn State the top supplier of talent for aerospace and defense companies.
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Great Northwest launches 18-month aerospace initiative - The Northwest Florida Daily News

Great Northwest launches 18-month aerospace initiative - The Northwest Florida Daily News | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
The Northwest Florida Daily News Great Northwest launches 18-month aerospace initiative The Northwest Florida Daily News NICEVILLE — Florida's Great Northwest, the regional economic development organization that represents 16 counties, has begun to...
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CONTRACT MANUFACTURING: Navy looks to Design West and SESCo to ... - Military & Aerospace Electronics

CONTRACT MANUFACTURING: Navy looks to Design West and SESCo to ... - Military & Aerospace Electronics | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Military & Aerospace Electronics
CONTRACT MANUFACTURING: Navy looks to Design West and SESCo to ...

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NASA News: 3D Printing in Space Brings 'Star Trek' Replicator to Life [VIDEO]

NASA News: 3D Printing in Space Brings 'Star Trek' Replicator to Life [VIDEO] | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it

 

Micro-manufacturing aboard the International Space Station is blurring the line between science and science fiction.

 

NASA says 3D printing aboard the space station will function a bit like the replicator from Star Trek, creating certain supplies and parts without the need for delivery.

 

Instead, a  machine can "print" out 3D objects layer by layer by laying down polymers and other materials.

 

The technology will ultimately help keep the 15-year-old orbiting research center in working order, the Telegraph reports.

 

"3D printing provides us the ability to do our own 'Star Trek' replication right there on the spot," NASA astronaut Timothy Creamer told the Telegraph, adding: "To help us replace things we've lost, replace things we've broken or maybe make things that we've thought of that would be useful."

 

The first 3D printer in space will arrive next year aboard a spacecraft on a resupply mission. It will make space missions more efficient -- and safer

 


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Orbital sign up ATK for solid partnership with Stratolaunch ALV | NASASpaceFlight.com

Orbital sign up ATK for solid partnership with Stratolaunch ALV | NASASpaceFlight.com | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it

ATK are now officially on board with the Stratolaunch system, following a deal with the launch vehicle’s main partner, Orbital Sciences Corporation. ATK will provide the first and second stages for the vehicle – nicknamed Pegasus II – that will be air-launched from a huge carrier plane, with test flights set to begin as early as 2017.

 

Announced at the end of 2011, Stratolaunch was revealed as a collaboration between inventor, investor and philanthropist Paul G. Allen and Scaled Composites founder Burt Rutan.

 

They envisioned a rocket that would be launched from a giant carrier aircraft, portrayed as having a wingspan of 385 feet, making it the largest airplane, by wingspan, to ever fly.

 

 


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NASA Selects Innovative Technology Proposals for Suborbital Flights | Parabolic Arc

NASA Selects Innovative Technology Proposals for Suborbital Flights | Parabolic Arc | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it

WASHINGTON (NASA PR) –NASA has selected for possible flight demonstration 10 proposals from six U.S. states for reusable, suborbital technology payloads and vehicle capability enhancements with the potential to revolutionize future space missions.

 

After the concepts are developed, NASA may choose to fly the technologies to the edge of space and back on U.S. commercial suborbital vehicles and platforms. These types of flights provide opportunities for testing in microgravity before the vehicles are sent into the harsh environment of space.

 

“As we prepare to venture forth in future science and exploration missions, one of our greatest challenges in advancing cutting-edge technologies is bridging the gap between testing a component or prototype in a laboratory or ground facility and demonstrating that technology or capability in a mission-relevant operational environment,” said Michael Gazarik, NASA’s associate administrator for space technology in Washington. “Microgravity suborbital flights provide relevant environment testing at a small fraction of the costs required for orbital flights, while advancing technologies that benefit American businesses and our economy.”

 


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Stepanov Sergey Mikhailovich's curator insight, August 18, 2013 7:33 AM

Music " Reflection " for our  Planet " Earth "
http://soundcloud.com/stepanov-sergei/reflection-1
yours sincerely    Mr.Stepanov S.M.    teacher of music     the Ukraine

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Ten Ways Cloud Computing Is Revolutionizing Aerospace And Defense - Forbes

Ten Ways Cloud Computing Is Revolutionizing Aerospace And Defense - Forbes | Bracke Manufacturing | Scoop.it
Ten Ways Cloud Computing Is Revolutionizing Aerospace And Defense Forbes Synchronizing new product development, supply chain, production and Maintenance, Repair & Overhaul (MRO) strategies across Aerospace and Defense (A&D) manufacturers while...

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