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How to start a cutting garden, part II - Mother Nature Network

How to start a cutting garden, part II - Mother Nature Network | Botany | Scoop.it
How to start a cutting garden, part II
Mother Nature Network
(Suggestions from the Missouri Botanical Garden) ... The variety of colors, ease of culture and long life in a vase make zinnias a universal choice for a great cut flower.
245732's insight:

I love cloning plants. Ever since I was little i love going into my garden and cutting pieces of plants off and replanting them. I always thought that it was so cool  you could cut off part of a plant and put it in the ground and it lives.

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Biologist and students develop iPad nature app in National Science Foundation-funded project - Loyola University New Orleans

Biologist and students develop iPad nature app in National Science Foundation-funded project - Loyola University New Orleans | Botany | Scoop.it

"Loyola University New Orleans biologist Aimée K. Thomas, Ph.D., is helping college students teach younger children the wonders of nature through an iPad app they helped create. The fruit of their labor, the iPad app “GO to Lake Thoreau,” is now available free in the iTunes app store.

 

 

The National Science Foundation is funding Thomas’ project to use innovative technology to prepare college students-turned naturalists to teach middle-school children. Thomas received the two-year $250,000 grant from the National Science Foundation through the Informal Science Education initiative."


Via John Evans
245732's insight:

Technology these days... Nowadays even if you're in nature you have an ipad. I guess its the 21st century and i have to get used to it, but if im every camping or on a hike deep in nature, no ipad or smart phone will be present.

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MPMI: A Bacterial Type III Secretion Assay for Delivery of Fungal Effector Proteins into Wheat (2013)

MPMI: A Bacterial Type III Secretion Assay for Delivery of Fungal Effector Proteins into Wheat (2013) | Botany | Scoop.it

Large numbers of candidate effectors from fungal pathogens are being identified through whole genome sequencing and in planta expression studies. AlthoughAgrobacterium-mediated transient expression has enabled high-throughput functional analysis of effectors in dicot plants, this assay is not effective in cereal leaves. Here we show that a non-pathogenic Pseudomonas fluorescens(Pf) engineered to express the T3SS of Pseudomonas syringae and the wheat pathogen Xanthomonas translucens (Xt) deliver fusion proteins containing T3SS signals from P. syringae (AvrRpm1) and X. campestris (AvrBs2) Avr proteins, respectively, into wheat leaf cells. A calmodulin-dependent adenylate cyclase (Cya) reporter protein was delivered effectively into wheat and barley by both bacteria. Absence of any disease symptoms with Pf, makes it more suitable than Xt) for detecting hypersensitive cell death (HR) induced by effector protein with avirulence activity. We further modified the delivery system by removal of the myristoylation site from the AvrRpm1 fusion to prevent its localisation to the PM which could inhibit recognition of an Avr protein. Delivery of the flax rust AvrM protein by the modified delivery system into transgenic tobacco leaves expressing the corresponding M resistance protein induced a strong HR indicating that the system is capable of delivering a functional rust Avr protein. In a preliminary screen of effectors from the stem rust fungus Puccinia graminisf. sp. tritici, we identified one effector that induced a host genotype-specific HR in wheat. Thus the modified AvrRpm1:effector/Pf system is an effective tool for large scale screening of pathogen effectors for recognition in wheat.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
245732's insight:

Another cool article I think. I find all walks of life interesting, even microbial plant diseases. I believe that studying these and how they work is always cool.

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Botany: The secret of short stems - Science Daily (press release)

Botany: The secret of short stems - Science Daily (press release) | Botany | Scoop.it
Botany: The secret of short stems
Science Daily (press release)
Botany: The Secret of Short Stems. Nov. 12, 2013 — Arabidopsis plants that only reach half their normal height have a mutation in the biosynthesis of the plant growth factor gibberellin.
245732's insight:

I find genetic plant mutations to be really cool. Its awesome how one genetic mutation can completely change the structure of a plant. As you can see, the plant on the left is much better as generally stems are useless. Mutations like these can make leaps and bounds in the plant indestry as it utilizes less space and is has more budding.

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Genecology and seed zones for tapertip onion in the US Great Basin - Botany

Genecology and seed zones for tapertip onion in the US Great Basin - Botany | Botany | Scoop.it

The choice of germplasm is critical for sustainable restoration, yet seed transfer guidelines are lacking for all but a few herbaceous species. Seed transfer zones based on genetic variability and climate were developed using tapertip onion (Allium acuminatum Hook.) collected in the Great Basin and surrounding areas in the United States. Bulbs from 53 locations were established at two common garden sites and morphological (such as leaf and scape dimensions), phenological (such as bolting date and flowering), and production traits (such as emergence and seeds per plant) were measured. Differences among source locations for plant traits within both common gardens were strong (P < 0.001), indicating genetic variation. Principal component 1 (PC 1) for phenological traits, with R2 = 0.59, and PC 1 for production traits, with R2 = 0.65, were consistently correlated with annual, maximum, minimum, and average temperature, annual precipitation, and frost-free days at source locations (P < 0.05). Regression of PC 1 phenology and PC 1 production scores with source location climates resulted in models with R2 values of 0.73 and 0.52, respectively. Using a geographic information system, maps of these models were overlaid to develop proposed seed zones to guide the choice of germplasm for conservation and restoration of tapertip onion across the collection region.


Via Plant Breeding and Genomics News
245732's insight:

Interesting... I found this to be strange that mildew gene has evlolved into such a problematic plant infection. I think studying things like this are pretty cool and so is finding out the cause of stuff like this.

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Wasps infesting, imperiling area's black oaks - Boston Globe

Wasps infesting, imperiling area's black oaks - Boston Globe | Botany | Scoop.it
Wasps infesting, imperiling area's black oaks Boston Globe After it fell to the ground, one of his graduate students pointed to telltale exit holes of the oak crypt gall wasp and used a pocketknife to expose the larvae, pupae, and adults that had...
245732's insight:

I wonder how wasps, i little insect, could bring down a tree. I guees many hands make quick work.

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Nutrient Burn | Grow Weed Easy

Nutrient Burn | Grow Weed Easy | Botany | Scoop.it
by Nebula Haze Is it Nutrient Burn? Also commonly known as cannabis "Nute Burn" Quick Summary: Nutrient burn is one of the most common beginner cannabis growing problems, and is a result of the roots taking in more nutrients than a cannabis plant...

Via Nebula Haze
245732's insight:

Very interesting. It seems like ignorant potheads think they can load their plants with fertilizer to the teeth. Of course this will decimate plant life and not produce anything of value.

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Nebula Haze's curator insight, November 4, 2013 9:54 PM

Is it nutrient burn... or something else? Nutrient burn is one of the most common beginner cannabis growing problems, and is a result of the roots taking in more nutrients than a cannabis plant can use. This excess level of nutrients causes a brown or yellow "burn" along the tips of your leaves. If nutrient levels are not lowered, the burnt tips start traveling inwards and tend to get crispy and twisted.

Rescooped by 245732 from FOOD? HEALTH? DISEASE? NATURAL CURES???
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'Scientists' Say Eating Organic Food Makes You a Jerk

'Scientists' Say Eating Organic Food Makes You a Jerk | Botany | Scoop.it
Do you eat real, organic food? If you do, you must be a jerk, according to a new ridiculous 'scientific study'.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
245732's insight:

I like this. It's mockingly making fun of attempts by big corporations(mcdonalds, monsanto, coke) to deter people from organic food. It says that according to "scientists" and "studies" organic food makes you a jerk. This of course is clearly outlined as propaganda and anyone who believes it is clearly and idiot.

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5 Beneficial Bugs that Could Help Your Organic Garden Grow

5 Beneficial Bugs that Could Help Your Organic Garden Grow | Botany | Scoop.it
Pesticides are not only failing at killing off crop-eating pests, they are also depleting our ecosystem of beneficial bugs that could help food growth.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
245732's insight:

It's true... The way to have a sustainable farming ecosystem you can't pour pesticides over it. Not only is this extremely shady and unhealthy for people, it simply doesn't work. This article explains how not every bug on crops is a pest that require pesticide. It's so true that you need some bugs to help aerate your garden and to hold off troublesome pests.

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