Wine, Life & Geek - entre Bordeaux & Toulouse
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Wine, Life & Geek - entre Bordeaux & Toulouse
Un savant mélange des genres:
WINE (wine learning tips & wine tasting), BORDEAUX et TOULOUSE (agenda & bons plans et Numérique Bordelais ou Toulousain), GERMANY (some insights after 6 years in Dortmund), DIGITAL (secteur du Numérique local ou non, Vin 2.0, geek stuff & Co).
Curated by sophiedesc
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World wakes up to German Pinot quality

World wakes up to German Pinot quality | Wine, Life & Geek - entre Bordeaux & Toulouse | Scoop.it
sophiedesc's insight:

“Pinot Noir from Germany is probably one of the most underrated wines in the world.”

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Un bar à vin 100% Bordeaux va ouvrir à New York - Terre de Vins

Un bar à vin 100% Bordeaux va ouvrir à New York - Terre de Vins | Wine, Life & Geek - entre Bordeaux & Toulouse | Scoop.it

En mars 2013 va s’ouvrir à New York un bar à vin 100% Bordeaux. Ce projet résulte d’un partenariat entre le CIVB (Conseil Interprofessionnel du Vin de Bordeaux) et le chef gascon Laurent Manrique, en charge de la restauration au Carlton de Manhattan.


Via Château la Levrette, Regis Chaigne
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Regis Chaigne's curator insight, January 10, 2013 11:06 AM

Oui, oui, des bars à Bordeaux dans toutes les grandes villes du monde !

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Wine: Why now is the time to buy Italian

Wine: Why now is the time to buy Italian | Wine, Life & Geek - entre Bordeaux & Toulouse | Scoop.it

When Italy surpassed France in wine production for the first time two years ago, the news was not greeted as a welcome achievement.
Aside from bragging rights, Italian vintners were faced with having to sell more wine than ever at a time when regional consumption was dropping.
It meant more Italian wine would be dumped into the so-called Wine Lake, a surplus of wine produced within the European Union, which buys the stuff and turns it into industrial alcohol.
In a European market of increasing supply and falling demand, that is not a winning scenario. Fortunately, however, Italian wineries are having their "Duh!" moment: by offering more well-made regional wines at reasonable prices, they can sell more wine.
For too many years, many Italian vintners suffered from a hubris built on the international success of very high-end wines like barolos and barbarescos and Super Tuscans. Buoyed by industry bureaucrats eager to award the prestigious D.O.C.G. appellation (a denomination of guaranteed high quality wine) to wines of little regional distinction, wineries tried to stick high price tags on wines of no real excellence.
Importers tried to convince wine drinkers that a bottle of unfamiliar verdicchio was worth $50 or a Santa Margherita pinot grigio $60 in a restaurant. As a result, wine lovers began moaning that Italian wines were pricing themselves out of the market.
Now, with sales sputtering and the Wine Lake brimming over, some very fine Italian vintners are getting into the market with delicious wines at prices right on the money. And it's happening at the retail level more than in restaurants, which continue to hike up margins three and four times above retail.


Via Mariano Pallottini
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