E-incunabla and "A Degree of Mastery" by Annie Tremmel Wilcox | Books On Books | Scoop.it

I have read "A Degree of Mastery" from cover to cover twice.  Once in New York between 2002 and 2005 when I was teaching "Professional Book and Information Publishing" at NYU and wanted readings to help provide students with a sense of the history, art and craft of the book. The second time here and now in Windsor looking for the "right something" to include in "Books On Books."

 

On both occasions ebooks and digital publishing pervaded my thoughts, but only on the second time around did these questions and observations I want to raise now shape themselves as they have.

 

Annie Tremmel Wilcox weaves a memoir of her apprenticeship under the renowned bookbinder and conservator William Anthony.  She weaves it with her diary entries, excerpts from an exhibit brochure "Saving Our Books and Words: The Conservation and Preservation of Books," newspaper articles, correspondence, passages from "Japanese Woodworking Tools: Their Tradition, Spirit and Use" by Toshio Odate, step by step descriptions of mending torn pages and crumbling leather spines and plainspoken observation of fellow workers, conference attendees, librarians, government officials posing with restored documents, children making "books" from striped computer paper with wallpaper sewn on for covers and, of course, Bill Anthony, the "Johnny Appleseed of bookbinding."

 

"Weaves" is the precise word for the structure of her book’s narrative, and it would be the right word for her ebook, if there were one.  As I re-read it, this game of word substitution yielded questions that make this memoir a useful means to bookmark the evolution of the book.

 

Writing about some of the tools she learns to use -- lifting knives, translucent bone folders, the spokeshave and others -- she says of Anthony's, "His tools were smarter than mine. They knew the correct way to cut paper or pare leather. By using them I could feel in my hands how the tools were supposed to work." (48)  For Wilcox and her reader, Bill Anthony is the master "shokunin," craftsman or artisan.  And when she quotes from Odate "For the 'shokunin,' utility and appearance must be enhanced by the tool's ‘presence,’ that is its refinement and dignity....," this reader asks, What are the tools of the ebook maker? From whence comes their refinement and dignity -- their "presence" -- with which the "shokunin" imbues his creation as a result of his commitment to his craft?  In what tools of the ebookmaker does "the spirit of the tool that records the 'shokunin's' ability through the years to face the uncertainties of life, to overcome them, and to master the art of living" reside?

 

Too Zen? Perhaps.

 

An English grad student, Wilcox relishes handling the University of Iowa's Sir Walter Scott Collection, its Leigh Hunt Collection and The Works of Rudyard Kipling.  Confronted with earlier slapdash and botched work on certain volumes of the Kipling, she writes, "Certainly these volumes of Kipling are found on the shelves of numerous libraries across the country, but the integrity of 'these' volumes as a complete set has been lost." (179)  What constitutes the "integrity" of an ebook or its constituents? Are ebooks so “immaterial” that such a question is nonsensical?

 

The author's apprenticeship included collaboration on the exhibit "Saving Our Books and Words."  In addition to coauthoring the exhibit's brochure, Wilcox contributed to completing Anthony's special project of developing for the exhibit a unique collection of models demonstrating "the evolution of the codex – the form of the book as we know it."(181)  In the brochure she touches on the immateriality and materiality of the Center's work: "Simply defined, preservation is the attempt to save the intellectual content of books while conservation is the attempt to save both the intellectual content and its vehicle -- the covers, paper, endbands, etc. The former is concerned with saving what the human record contains without regard to the forms it winds up in. The latter focuses on the artifact itself, attempts to save this book, this sheet." (192)   What is the “form” of the ebook as we know it? Is the ebook as much "vehicle" as "content"?  What are its equivalencies to the page or to what "binds" the "text block"?  What does it mean to "conserve" an ebook?  Of a digital copy, what are the materials; what is the artifact to be conserved?

 

Wilcox ends her memoir with the completion of her "masterpiece," the restoration of the incunabulum that Bill Anthony assigned her before his death and which she completed after it with the help of "The Restoration of Leather Bindings" by Bernard Middleton, author of the standard text "A History of English Craft Bookbinding Technique."  The work assigned was Pope Pius II's "Historia Rerum Ubique Gestarum," printed by Johannes De Colonia and Johannes Manthen in Venice in 1477, which when restored was "not a deluxe edition, but … had great integrity."  In the year 2547, of what will the preservation and conservation of today’s e-incunabula consist?  Will some apprentice conservator understand the “form” of these ebooks "in the cradle" and, master of smart tools, restore them to their integrity?

 

The image embedded above is of a page from the "Historia Rerum Ubique Gestarum," credit http://digital.lib.uiowa.edu/u?/paper,1640.