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Is There a Right Age to Read a Book? | Tor.com

Is There a Right Age to Read a Book? | Tor.com | Books | Scoop.it
On reading books before you are ready for them. (Is there a right age to read a book? Jo Walton muses on reading literature before you're ready for it.
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Rescooped by Amber Alesi from Publishing Digital Book Apps for Kids
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Great Kid Books: Children's literature heroes -- what they say about our times

Great Kid Books: Children's literature heroes -- what they say about our times | Books | Scoop.it

Children's stories permeate our culture. Whether it's Disney films, Broadway musicals or even public television, characters from children's stories sink deep into our cultural heritage.

 

This is nothing new -- the Brothers Grimm recorded fairy tales that had been passed down generation to generation; these same tales still enchant us centuries later.

 

But lately I've been wondering what the heroes from children's literature say about our times.

 

Read more at GreatKidBooks.blogspot.com ...


Via Carisa Kluver
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Carisa Kluver's curator insight, June 26, 2013 7:07 PM

Nice post from school librarian MaryAnn Scheuer

Emily K. Reuter's curator insight, January 20, 12:42 AM

Historically speaking, children's books serve the culturally important lessons or values of the time to the child reader. In the 1700s, the History of Miss Goody Two-Shoes taught lessons on religion and morality in the form of good deeds will guarantee heaven. In the 1960s, Norton Juster's The Phantom Tollbooth suggested directly and indirectly the severe importance of a good education. Children's books are full of hidden historical lessons rich for the taking by the undergraduate literature student.

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Creative Writing and Empathy: How Writing Fiction Helps You Connect With Others

Creative Writing and Empathy: How Writing Fiction Helps You Connect With Others | Books | Scoop.it

Writing forces you to “walk in your characters’ shoes” in a way that reading can’t.

 

Empathy and fiction: what’s the connection? Empathy is an important thing: when you lack it completely, you’re a psychopath, and no one wants that, except perhaps if you happen to be a character in a thriller.

 

One of my friends who studies psychology posted this on Facebook a while back: it’s an article about why men should read fiction and claims that reading fiction teaches men to empathize with others.

 

Victoria Grefer


Via Edwin Rutsch
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