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Rescooped by Julie Witt from Tools for Teachers & Learners
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Create Ebooks - PapyrusEditor

Create Ebooks - PapyrusEditor | Book Ladders | Scoop.it
Papyrus is a simple online editor to create ebooks.You can edit the cover using a simple drag and drop cover editor, import content from the web, or create new content as easily as writing a blog post.If you want to sell your ebook, all you have to do is set a price and click publish.

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Curatorially Yours's curator insight, May 2, 2014 5:09 AM

Looks interesting - I'll be checking this one out when I get a spare moment!

Alfredo Corell's curator insight, May 3, 2014 2:05 PM

An awesome web based ePub & PDF creator. Create & edit online & it will generate ePub & PDF of your book for download.

sarah's curator insight, May 4, 2014 1:32 PM

Intéressant pour nos UD´s. en ligne.

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Silent reading isn’t so silent, at least, not to your brain | Neurotic Physiology

Silent reading isn’t so silent, at least, not to your brain | Neurotic Physiology | Book Ladders | Scoop.it

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Rescooped by Julie Witt from Metaglossia: The Translation World
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School libraries keep reading skills up over summer

Several schools throughout Baltimore County are opening the doors to their school libraries this summer so students can borrow books to read and continue lea...


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Jay Bansbach's curator insight, July 10, 2013 4:04 PM

Excellent local coverage!

 

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iBooks Reading Guides

iBooks Reading Guides | Book Ladders | Scoop.it

"

One thing I love about iBooks is how easy it is to take notes and organize your thinking. I use iBooks to prepare reading guides for student book clubs. If your students are reading classic texts (Treasure Island, Jane Eyre, etc.) these books can be downloaded for free.  If my students are going to be reading in a book club with hard copies of a text, I’ll purchase a copy on iBooks so I can prepare a reading guide for them. Here’s how:"


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16 Apps That Motivate Kids to Read

16 Apps That Motivate Kids to Read | Book Ladders | Scoop.it

"For every kid who is caught hiding beneath his covers with a flashlight and a novel at midnight, there is another who has to be begged and pleaded with to read.  And the latter might need a little extra—shall we call it encouragement?—to become a great reader. To help, we've rounded up a list of the top apps that not only teach essential reading skills but also motivate kids—even the most book-phobic—to read, read and read some more."


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Mª Jesús García S.M.'s curator insight, July 11, 2013 6:56 AM

Apps que fomentan la lectura.

stevecarter's curator insight, August 6, 2013 8:28 AM

A nice new summary of good reading Apps

Dave Sharp's curator insight, May 10, 7:13 PM
Reading apps allow students to overcome difficulties with reading skills. With sound and visual effects students become engaged with the app and can be used for many ages.
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Tips for Holding Students Accountable to Choice Reading: Reading Ladders

Tips for Holding Students Accountable to Choice Reading: Reading Ladders | Book Ladders | Scoop.it
What is a Reading Ladder, and where does this idea originate? A Reading Ladder is simply a piece of explanatory writing where students rank the books they've read according to complexity, reflect o...
Julie Witt's insight:

A different approach...

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The Book That Changed Me Forever

The Book That Changed Me Forever | Book Ladders | Scoop.it
"Sure. Whatever," I murmured, as I continued slouching and staring. Little did I know that before my 14th birthday, that brick of a book would capture my heart and change me forever.

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GoogleLitTrips Reading List's curator insight, July 29, 2013 10:10 AM

In this case the book was Gone With the Wind. Though this particular 15 year-old high school student's article is pretty much entirely focused upon the impact that GWTW had on her life, the article isn't about GWTW at all; at least not from this English teacher's point of view.

It's about Vygotsky's Zone of Proximal Development. In this case, the initial contact with GWTW was Ms Barlas' mother's insight that her daughter might like the book because it was "based in Atlanta [where we live} so you might enjoy it." 

But even then, Ms Barlas was reluctant to read the book for a catalog of reasons not at all unlike the catalog of reasons that cause her friends and peers and many of our students to be resistant to reading. Too thick, too distant from the world I live in or care about, a main character who was too snobby, and perhaps most significant, too distant from what friends would approve of in that peer-pressure laden straight jacket sort of way that makes stepping out of the box an act of courage beyond the available self-confidence strength required to "go where no friend has gone before."

But, as happens with many young adults attempting to make their way through the cocoon phase of life, Ms Barlas did read the book. She did face the challenge of going where she had not gone before. She dealt with the potentially crippling taunting of her friends. And, she wound up on a classic "one thing just led to another" journey that changed her life.

Resistant rejection gradually became relatively unenthusiastic reading, then intrigued engagement, then enjoyment, then love, then love of all things related to GWTW, then to an exploration and discovery of an entire world of places and cultures and films and music and history and to a passionate driving force to go beyond her previous boundaries.

You can almost see a beautiful butterfly emerging from the cocoon of unknowing; a young adult coming to care about things she never cared about as she also discovered the shallowness of caring about things she'd come to realize weren't really worth spending much effort caring about.

It's a beautiful story. That is, Ms Barlas' story is beautiful. Gone With the Wind may or may not be a beautiful story. But, it played a beautiful role in Ms Barlas' story.

No book or poem or play is a must read for every young adult. Ms Barlas' journey, like our own, is a personal journey. GWTW was the book in her case; it was not the book in many, MANY others' cases. The same can be said of any one the many books in the great canon.

In my case, there were a few stories that set me on a similar journey. Fear Strikes Out by Jimmy Piersall took me on an unexpected journey from my fairly deep interest in baseball to a place well beyond my interest in basebal;l to a world I'd never cared about, the world of compassion for those suffering from mental illnesses. That book was responsible for deleting my ignorant and irresponsible use of the word "retard" as a valued put-down.

It was the movie Goldfinger that led me to read the book and then to read every James Bond book by Ian Fleming, to discovering Ian Fleming had also written Chitty Chitty Bang Bang, to discovering the joys of "knowing an author not just a story "by whoever it was that had written the story."

It was Voltaire's Candide and the film The Graduate that took me from my high priority of being the class clown who thought anything that made people laugh was funny to discovering that satire can open one's eyes to more important things to care about than the laughs-at-any-cost attention, I craved so much. 

And, in my case, this was the beginning of my journey towards becoming an English teacher who eventually realized that the power of great and even not-so-great-storytelling to "bust us out of cocoons we don't even know we're in; to shine a light in a room we had never realized was nearly pitch black; to change catepillars into butterfles and human beings into humane beings is a wonderful thing. And, to take my passion for sharing the value of great storytelling as a sacred obligation that combined the Venn-like coming together of nearness, readiness, and life's great questions.

Though I knew it by various other names, I'd like to give Ms Barlas' history teacher a shout out for her integration of an "orbital studies" project that allowed students to explore history from beyond the "disaggrated" divisions into which we've traditionally broken our curricula. This is not to say that our curricula is broken; but there are pieces that would benefit from being put back together.

And, coming from the literature side, though I still have some reservations about common core implementations, I was pleased to see that Ms Barlas's journey led her to appreciate the contributions of both literary reading and informational reading to her greater appreciation for life's many great challenges...and rewards.

 ~ http://www.GoogleLitTrips.com ~

 

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Want to Improve Your Reading Skills? - WebFnatic

Want to Improve Your Reading Skills? - WebFnatic | Book Ladders | Scoop.it

For those of you who struggle to read, here is a way to improve on your reading skills


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Rimba Baca Makes Reading Fun for Children and Adults - The Jakarta Globe

Rimba Baca Makes Reading Fun for Children and Adults - The Jakarta Globe | Book Ladders | Scoop.it
Rimba Baca Makes Reading Fun for Children and Adults http://t.co/iBhBa9Adhi @aldoswastia @thesasongkoo @gellygalelika @kanikhaa
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The Unputdownable Book Club's Summer Reading List

The Unputdownable Book Club's Summer Reading List | Book Ladders | Scoop.it
It's been summer for almost three weeks now... at least according to the solstice. Ottawa and many other cities are not experiencing much traditional summer weather, however. Although our weather m...
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Teri Lesesne on Reading Ladders from Choice Literacy Podcasts

Teri Lesesne on Reading Ladders from Choice Literacy Podcasts | Book Ladders | Scoop.it
Listen to episodes of Choice Literacy Podcasts on podbay.fm.
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Region 10

Books and Readers and Ladders?Teri LesesneSam Houston State University
Julie Witt's insight:

Interesting organization of ladders by play, empathy,...very Daniel Pink

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Beyond the Book: Infographics of Students' Reading History

Beyond the Book: Infographics of Students' Reading History | Book Ladders | Scoop.it
I'm an evangelist.

A book evangelist, that is. I hand out books to students and colleagues, booktalking them in class, at lunch, and even in my email signature. I want my students to read widely and

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Beth Dichter's curator insight, June 20, 2013 8:43 PM

What would happen if you asked your students' to reflect on their reading history...and then have them create an infographic that helps them dig a bit deeper and share what they have learned? According to this teacher the finished product is pretty amazing!

She began with an article from the NYTimes "What's Your Reading History? Reflecting on the Self as Reader". Then she had students explore infographics and critique them as a group. The students then explored a number of websites that allow you to create infographics (and links are provided to them) and students chose one to work with. The post provides links to a number of infographics made by the students.

And the link to the article at the NYTimes is http://learning.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/03/04/whats-your-reading-history-reflecting-on-the-self-as-reader/?_r=0.