Book Arts & Design
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Rescooped by Katherine Pulido from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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The Best Illustrations From All Your Favorite Children's Books

The Best Illustrations From All Your Favorite Children's Books | Book Arts & Design | Scoop.it
Characters from children's books often take on legendary status in the popular imagination. Peter Pan inspired his own pathological syndrome (and maybe R.

Via Thomas Faltin
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Mexican director Guillermo del Toro to release illustrated book - Reuters UK

Mexican director Guillermo del Toro to release illustrated book - Reuters UK | Book Arts & Design | Scoop.it
New York Daily News Mexican director Guillermo del Toro to release illustrated book Reuters UK NEW YORK (Reuters) - Mexican writer-director Guillermo del Toro is releasing an illustrated book of notes and drawings from his private journals and...
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Rescooped by Katherine Pulido from Le It e Amo ✪
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Intricately Cut Paper Sculptures Mimic Stained Glass Windows

Intricately Cut Paper Sculptures Mimic Stained Glass Windows | Book Arts & Design | Scoop.it
Virginia-based paper artist Eric Standley meticulously cuts and layers thin sheets of paper to construct sculptural creations that look like stained glass win…

Via Leggo Tung Lei
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How To Make a Letterpress Texture Effect in Photoshop

How To Make a Letterpress Texture Effect in Photoshop | Book Arts & Design | Scoop.it
I've received a few questions recently about how I create the letterpress style texturing that appears on pretty much every retro/vintage design I make. Today's.
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Rescooped by Katherine Pulido from Book Arts and BookBinding
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Your House by Olafur Eliasson

Your House by Olafur Eliasson | Book Arts & Design | Scoop.it

Artist Olafur Eliasson created this limited-edition cutout book based on his Copenhagen home. As you flip through the pages, the layers of his space become more and more apparent. This concept started as a commission by the Library Council of The Museum of Modern Art in New York. There are 454 pages in total, and each is individually laser-cut. The book is organized just like the home---as readers flip through the pages, they slowly make their way through the rooms of the house from front to back. The level of detail is absolutely mind-blowing. The patterning in the barrel ceiling and the window are incredible, don't you think?

 

 


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Chris Lott's curator insight, October 5, 2013 12:03 AM

An amazingly detailed work. It just makes me want to touch it.


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The Universal Arts of Graphic Design | Off Book | PBS Digital Studios

Though often overlooked, Graphic Design surrounds us: it is the signs we read, the products we buy, and the rooms we inhabit. Graphic designers find beauty w...
Katherine Pulido's insight:

This is a great history of illustration--it covers so many different issues in 7 minutes!

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Visual Storytelling Through Intricate Paper Designs

Visual Storytelling Through Intricate Paper Designs | Book Arts & Design | Scoop.it

Australian artist Emma Van Leest turns a simple sheet of paper into a magical visual story. She hand-cuts intricate patterns into large sheets, and then mounts them with glue onto foamcore. Several layers set against a vibrant, colorful backdrop form Van Leest's three-dimensional scenes, which reference children's stories, folk art, Medieval saints, and Hindu literature.

 

With just a simple blade, Van Leest carves out delicate, elaborate details that can take anywhere from 30 minutes to 2 months to create. Her inspiration comes from many of her travels overseas, as well as the time she spends reading in the library and exploring high quality images online.

 

Van Leest loves working with paper because "It’s such an ephemeral, everyday material that we all use. We scribble on it, scrunch it up, throw it out. It’s lightweight and accessible which means that you don’t think of creating something so delicate and painstaking as a papercut with it. It’s exciting to create something of beauty and interest out of it."


Via Gregg Morris
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Lindsey Lindgren's curator insight, July 13, 2014 9:21 PM

When paper becomes magical and tells a story. Emma Van Leest makes paper a cooler medium then before. She uses the works to create 3D scenes that tell stories. She alters the use and meaning of paper.