Bogs and their Surrounding Biomes
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Scooped by Eric Trevino
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Palm oil production, peatland loss and CO2 emissions

This video shows how palm oil is threatening Southeast Asia's tropical peatlands. Due to drainage of the swamps, the peat oxidates and releases huge amounts ...
Eric Trevino's insight:

After much research, we found that Wetlands International is a credible source and the CRAAP test requirements have been met for the most part. There was not a works cited for the video istelf, but much of the Wetlands International articles have been cited properly on their website. The idea of the video is to address the problems that peatlands bring when they inturupt the bogs natural biomes. The drainage of swamps in southeast Asia have recently been starting to cause erosion and environmental problems in the surrounding areas. 

Drainage, conversion to farmland and fertilisation of peat soils turns peatlands into wastelands within decades due to soil subsidence and fires. Agriculture, forestry and mining have so far destroyed about 25% of the peatlands on Earth. Large parts of the enormous peatlands of North America and Russia are still relatively intact. However, in many parts of Europe, Central and Southeast Asia, Argentina and Chile, peatlands have been destroyed.

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Creigh Blodgett's comment, November 14, 2013 9:43 AM
Wetlands International is a credible source and the CRAAP test requirements have been met for the most part. There was not a works cited for the video istelf, but much of the Wetlands International articles have been cited properly on their website. The idea of the video is to address the problems that peatlands bring when they inturupt the bogs natural biomes. The drainage of swamps in southeast Asia have recently been starting to cause erosion and environmental problems in the surrounding areas.
Rescooped by Eric Trevino from Wind power and other renewables
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The wind farms that add to carbon emissions built on peat bogs.

The wind farms that add to carbon emissions built on peat bogs. | Bogs and their Surrounding Biomes | Scoop.it

“ Daily Mail The wind farms 'that ADD to carbon emissions': Sites built on peat bogs could ... Daily Mail 'Peatland is not suitable for wind farms for a whole host of environmental reasons, not just carbon loss,' said Mr Lindsay.”


Via Jesús Lorenzo Vieites
Eric Trevino's insight:

Wind farms: C for currency 

When was this info published? Feb. 24, 2013 When was it revised? Feb. 24, 2013 Is it out of date? No 

The wind farms located on the peat bogs will use the climate around the bogs in order to power electricity. The importance of this is that although peat bogs are moist and contain the appropriate climate to harvest these wind turbines, however the wind turbines ultimately dry out the peat bogs and render them useless after too much use. 

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Irish wind farms on the bogs of Ireland could provide the whole of the UK with power

Irish wind farms on the bogs of Ireland could provide the whole of the UK with power | Bogs and their Surrounding Biomes | Scoop.it

“ Wind farms on the bogs of Ireland could provide the whole of the UK with power...”


Via Diverse Eireann
Eric Trevino's insight:
Irish Wind Farms: R for relevance Who is the audience intended for? People who currently reside in Ireland and the UK. How much info is presented? A significant amount that covers the plan for providing Ireland and the UK with wind power from wind farms with power. Is the information detailed or superficial? The information goes in depth about the specifics of the plans. Is the relationship related to the topic? Yes, because it informs the audience of the climate that can be found within peat bogs. What is the intended readership level? Typically for adults who are interested in a green way to provide energy coming from bogs. 
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Northern peatlands in Ireland contain extremely high levels of carbon emission that provide a low decomposition rate.

Description

Eric Trevino's insight:

I found this article on JSTOR and this is a copy of an abstract written in 2004 by the Springer Ecosystems Company.  What the main topic in this abstract is trying to tell us is that many of the peatlands are struggling to decompose properly because the liter is not  opposed from vascular plants and so the peatlands are soaking up vast amounts of land that once once covered in Water. Although the lands are perfect for farming, eventually the land becomes depleted and dried up.  Our CRAAP test was successful in the aspects that the article did not contain bias because the information is used to support a world database. 

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Rescooped by Eric Trevino from Flash Science News
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Peat Wars: Ancient Bogs Can Be a Miracle Plant Food and a Precious Carbon Sink

Peat Wars: Ancient Bogs Can Be a Miracle Plant Food and a Precious Carbon Sink | Bogs and their Surrounding Biomes | Scoop.it

“ An English bog It’s a battle over turf—peat, to be exact.”


Via EA
Eric Trevino's insight:

Bogs are miracle food: P for purpose Is there a purpose for the article? To provide the audience with information over the ongoing debate about whether peat bogs should serve as plant food or rather carbon sink? Is there a bias? Yes, the author is siding with the government's opinion that bogs should be used to help clean air rather than grow crops. 
How would the bias influence the information? The bias influences the reader ultimately over the issue. 

Peatlands represent half of the Earth’s wetlands and cover 3% of the global total land area. They are found in almost every country in the world. Examples of naturally forested peatlands are the Alder peat forests in Europe and the lowland humid tropical forests in Southeast Asia. Small tracts of tropical peatlands are also found in parts of Latin America, Africa and the Caribbean.

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Rescooped by Eric Trevino from CLOVER ENTERPRISES ''THE ENTERTAINMENT OF CHOICE''
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British Gardeners Battle Over Peat, for Bogs’ Sake

British Gardeners Battle Over Peat, for Bogs’ Sake | Bogs and their Surrounding Biomes | Scoop.it

“ While many gardeners regard the partially decomposed plant matter as an elixir, environmentalists say taking peat from centuries-old bogs disturbs vital ecosystems.”


Via VERONICA LESTER
Eric Trevino's insight:

The peatlands have scraped off the tops of centuries-old bogs, which are vital ecosystems that also serve as natural stores of carbon, just like rain forests. We did. CRAAP test on this article, but the article is a little outdated. We know that this information can still be used to asses the problems of peatlands and the effects it has on  bogs. This article is advocating a ban of the use of peat but a ban could cause the British horticulture industry to lose out to growers in the Netherlands or Italy who would continue to use peat because it works so well.

 

Peatlands are carbon-rich, containing twice as much carbon stock as the entire forest biomass of the world. When disturbed, peatlands can become significant sources of greenhouse gas emissions.

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