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Cube Cities blog: Midtown Manhattan Growth Animation (1850-2015)

Cube Cities blog: Midtown Manhattan Growth Animation (1850-2015) | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
John Blunnie's insight:

With an evergrowing population theres a need to expand. When trapped on a small island you can't expand to the side you must expand upwards. 100 years from now most building will probably double in height again.

 

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Density and Emptiness

Density and Emptiness | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it

"In the end of 2012 I travelled to USA to experience something new. And it was something I didn't expect: emptiness and density.  'Merge' is the last part of a project series 'Empty, Dense, Merge' which explores two opposite feelings through the photos of places located in USA.  In this project two opposite places are merged into one: New York City, where, it seems like everyone wants to live there, and Grand Canyon / Death Valley, which are unlivable."


Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

Great photo combining the U.S.'s great spaces with its metropolisis'.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 20, 2013 8:01 AM

This is geographically inspired art at it's finest.  It goes beyond making beautiul jewelry with maps or showing majestic vistas of natural landscapes; the artistic concept that motivated the photographer was geographic in nature.  Population density is highly clustered leaving great spaces of open, empty, unpopulated land and some major cities that are jam-packed with human activity and settlements.  Merging both of these concepts into the same image produced this series of 6 images (as seen in this Atlantic Cities article).


Tags: art, density, NYC, landscape.

oyndrila's comment, July 21, 2013 12:37 AM
Excellent visual resource to convey the concepts.
Josue Maroquin's comment, August 12, 2013 6:17 PM
Amazing it almost looks lkike we, in the US, are living in a huge bowl
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In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map

In Kenya, Using Tech To Put An 'Invisible' Slum On The Map | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
A billion people worldwide live in slums, largely invisible to city services and governments — but not to satellites.

Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

Great how tech and globalization can help represed people in other countries.

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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, July 25, 2013 4:47 PM

Slums also known as favelas, squatter settlements

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, October 6, 2013 2:07 PM

The slum-mapping movement began in India almost a decade ago and migrated to africa, the idea of this is to make slums a reality to people who have never set foot in one before. The maps can be used in court to stop evictions or simply to raise awarance. I think this idea is on the right track of what needs to be done. These people need help and so many people incuding the governement pretend they arent their but with these maps as proof they can no longer do that.    

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 7:24 AM

Slums and squatter settlements are a problem that a lot of the developing world has to deal with.  The unsafe and unsanitary buildings cause headaches and problems for the leaders of the cities they surround.  This story is hopeful in that the city did manage to bring a water line out to get clean water to the people living in this area.  Perhaps this will lead to a better quality of life of the inhabitants of this particular slum.  Also the project of mapping such areas can be a useful tool for city planners to better regulate these areas and help the people that live there.,

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What Happens When Everyone Makes Maps?

What Happens When Everyone Makes Maps? | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
OpenStreetMap and other free, online tools have allowed anyone to become a cartographer.
John Blunnie's insight:

THis "wiki"map is a free map data source made by the people for the people. Crowdsourcing maps isn't a new idea but it seems this is the first time a major go of it has been put on the internet.

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Political Geography Now: Mali Conflict Map: National Territory Reunited Ahead of Elections (#6)

Political Geography Now: Mali Conflict Map: National Territory Reunited Ahead of Elections (#6) | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
Updated map of the situation in Mali as it prepares for elections on July 28, 2013.
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Map: Al Qaeda and Its Associated Movements, March 2013

Map: Al Qaeda and Its Associated Movements, March 2013 | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
A map showing areas of operation and safe havens for Al Qaeda and its associated movements as of March 2013.To Download the full PDF version, click here.
John Blunnie's insight:

Al Queda as of 2013 has activity from Moracco to Pakistan, from Kenya to Russia's border. It seems their activity isn't shutting down anytime soon.

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A Nation of Wineries

A Nation of Wineries | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
Comparing different regions of the United States wine industry over time.
John Blunnie's insight:

Wine is made in every state in the U.S. The diversity in U.S. environemnts gives rise to a diverse amount of grape types and therefore drastically different tasting wines, all from the same country.

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California's biggest dam removal project in history begins in Carmel Valley

California's biggest dam removal project in history begins in Carmel Valley | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
In a project that will be watched by engineers and biologists across the nation, construction crews today will begin a three-year, $84 million project to tear down the hulking San Clemente Dam in Californias largest dam-removal project ever.

Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

So much money and time needed to tear down something that was most likely a marvel of its time. Also another sign the the industrial era is way behind us.

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Geography Teachers' Association of Victoria Inc. (GTAV)'s curator insight, August 7, 2013 4:45 PM

CD - The nature of water scarcity and ways of overcoming it, including studies drawn from Australia and West Asia and/or North Africa.

 

This example is in the USA but too interesting to not include!

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Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America?

Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America? | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it

There is a pretty ridiculous North-South split, although Maryland, northern Virginia, and southern Florida (which is pretty much the North anyways) fall into pancake territory, while Waffle House has made inroads into Ohio and Indiana.


Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

I remember seeing a Waffle House across from a Waffle house int he middle of nowhere Georgia. Now i know why, its the center of WaffleHouse country.

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Kenny Dominguez's curator insight, November 20, 2013 1:42 PM


I live in IHOP America because I have never heard of Waffle House and another reason is there are only Ihops were I live. If waffle would expand to the northeast I would gladly try it because I enjoy Eating waffles.

Travis Winger's curator insight, January 7, 7:25 PM

This article shows some pretty simple aspects of Northern and Southern Culture in whether they prefer pancakes of waffles. This article shows how culture can be a major difference or just a waffle or pancake.

Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 9, 8:35 PM

This article basically shows that South prefer waffles than pancakes. Although, there's very small part of Texas that prefers waffles over pancakes. 

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Political Geography Now: Syria Civil War Map: June 2013 (#10)

Political Geography Now: Syria Civil War Map: June 2013 (#10) | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
Map of rebel activity and control in the Syrian Civil War, updated for June 2013. Recent changes include Qusayr and areas around the Golan Heights and Daraa in the south.
John Blunnie's insight:

Seeing this map really opened my eyes to how widespread this civil war really is. It seems that little of the populated areas are unaffected.  A ward this widespread may take quite awhile to diffuse without foreign intervention.

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Croatia celebrates on joining EU

Croatia celebrates on joining EU | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
Croatia becomes the 28th member of the European Union after a decade of negotiations, with thousands joining celebrations across the country.
John Blunnie's insight:

Croatia joins as the first new E.U. member in 6 years. The reason for joining must be longterm rather then shortterm since many countries in the E.U. are struggling economically just as much as croatia, where unemployment is 1 in 5.

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Do Geography and Altitude Shape the Sounds of a Language?

Do Geography and Altitude Shape the Sounds of a Language? | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
Languages that evolve at high elevations are more likely to include a sound that's easier to make when the air is thinner, new research shows

Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

An interesting trend was found between language and geography. It seems the higher the elevation, the more likely the spoken language contains ejective consonants (in which an intense burst of air is released). This is due to air beiong more easily compressed when the air is less dense.

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PatrickHance's comment, September 2, 2013 6:33 PM
Recently, a University of Miami linguist named Caleb Everett made a surprising discovery about how geography influences language. Previously, it was assumed that how languages developed sounds was random. His findings show that languages with ejective consonants have a strong tendency to be in high-altitude regions. Ejective consonants are made by suddenly releasing an intense burst of air, and about 20% of the worlds languages have them. By sampling 567 of the 6909 known languages, Everett found that 87% of languages with ejective consonants are found in areas above 1500 meters. Only 43% of languages originating in high altitude areas were without ejectives, and just 4% of languages developed far from high altitudes had ejectives. Everett also found that as the altitude of a language's origin point grew, so did the chance of it containing ejectives. Assuming that his findings hold up when the rest of the world's languages are analyzed, this would be the first time geography was proven to change the sounds of a language.
PatrickHance's comment, September 2, 2013 6:56 PM
I feel that this is a very important article. If his analysis remains true for all the other remaining languages in the world, then it'll be a major discovery. This research may open up a whole new branch of linguistics, regarding how languages are shaped by geography. Soon, we could be discovering how dry, mountain air could help you make clearer sounds, and so on. From there, we could be studying how factors like socioeconomic status change your speech. The prospects for a big discovery like this are amazing.
PatrickHance's comment, September 2, 2013 7:02 PM
Stromberg, Joseph. "Do Geography and Altitude Shape the Sounds of a Language?." Surprising Science. Smithsonian, 12 Jun 2013. Web. 1 Sep. 2013. <http://blogs.smithsonianmag.com/science/2013/06/do-geography-and-altitude-shape-the-sounds-of-a-language/>.
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Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data

Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it

"By using Facebook data from the 2.5 million people in New York or New England that ‘like’ either the Red Sox or Yankees I was able to create a more accurate rivalry map than ever before."


Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

A fun map i can relate to a lot being a New Yorker living in RI. I also believe theres more Yankee fans in Red Sox territory then Red Sox fans in Yankee territory.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 21, 2013 6:48 PM

Sports maps with team logos on them are often hand-drawn works of art without much data to back them up--not so with this map.  Read the article to find the actual data which is much messier than these bold color proclaim.  These regions aren't homogenous (are they ever?) but this is the best fit line between the major groups of fans, showing that Connecticut is the true 'battle ground' for this regional rivalry. 


Tags: sport, statistics, mapping, regions, Rhode Island, Boston, NYC.

trampolinecalf's comment, September 26, 2013 11:55 PM
nice
Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:26 AM

Pretty neat use of mapping and facebook to create this. This map is around the idea of what i expected it to look like with a few exceptions. As a yankee fan i expected a little bit more out of fellow Rhode Islanders when it came to the distribution but i guess i was wrong. i would also like to point out that cultural diversity probably has a role to play in this, with western connecticut being more ethnically diverse than eastern.

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The Decline of Detroit in Five Maps

The Decline of Detroit in Five Maps | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
Detroit was once the nation’s fourth most-populous city. Today, it became the largest American city to file for bankru
John Blunnie's insight:

The bankrupt Detroit's great decline as shown by five maps.

 

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Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map

Go Ahead, Try Drawing an Outline of the Midwest on a Map | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
No one quite agrees on what counts as America's "Midwest," but its pattern of urbanization is one of a kind.
John Blunnie's insight:

Article on what American's consider the "midwest". Its interesting how different people can view were a region is when it has no official boundaries.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 13, 2013 7:30 AM

Regions can have very nebulous borders...the Midwest is a perfect example of a vernacular region with as many different borders as there are people to draw them. 


Mark Solomon's curator insight, August 21, 2013 7:31 AM

The American Midwest is a good example of a vernacular region, as it is perceived in different ways by many different people as an important part of their cultural history.

Al Picozzi's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:08 AM

It really is hard to determine the regions as everyone has their own ideas and opinions of what consititues a region.  Some I think are easy because they have been set in history, like New England. It is the six north east states that has long been set in history.  However something like the South is hard to define.  Is Texas the south becasue it fought with the south in the Civil War or is it part of the west because it is west of the Mississippi? 

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A Quick Geography Lesson On The British Isles : NPR

A Quick Geography Lesson On The British Isles : NPR | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
The UK, Great Britain, and England are located near each other — or better yet are comprised of one another — yet many make the common mistake of referring to them as one in the same.
John Blunnie's insight:

Short video explaining the United Kingdom and its 4 countries that make it up. Something so simple is rarely explained so its a good watch.

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Map of shark attacks worldwide - Australian Geographic

Map of shark attacks worldwide - Australian Geographic | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
The Australian Geographic Society is dedicated to supporting scientific research, protecting and fostering a love for our environment and natural heritage, encouraging the spirit of discovery and adventure and spreading knowledge of Australia to...
John Blunnie's insight:

Unprovoked shark attacks since 1580!

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Cube Cities blog: Midtown Manhattan Growth Animation (1850-2015)

Cube Cities blog: Midtown Manhattan Growth Animation (1850-2015) | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
John Blunnie's insight:

With an evergrowing population theres a need to expand. When trapped on a small island you can't expand to the side you must expand upwards. 100 years from now most building will probably double in height again.

 

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China's Sustainable Cave Hotel Under Construction

China's Sustainable Cave Hotel Under Construction | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it

Construction has started on a cave hotel resort by Atkins that will nestle into the rockface of an abandoned water-filled quarry near Shanghai, China.

Once complete, the hotel will offer around 400 rooms, as well as conference facilities, a banquet hall, restaurants, a swimming pool and a water-sports centre.

The building will use geothermal technologies to generate its own electricity and lighting, while greenery will blanket a roof that extends just two storeys above the edge of the quarry.

 

Sustainability is integral to Atkins' design of this unique resort, built into an abandoned, water-filled quarry.


Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

It seems even the Chinese tourist industry is at the forefront of hotel construction. This place looking breathtaking.

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, July 3, 2013 8:48 AM

what an article to use or open up class discussion with in any number of classes - world geography, science, economics, government........ interesting article in general.   

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 1:51 AM

China is a major topic this year, could be good.

Resort and Hotel Mythbusters's comment, September 9, 2013 11:08 PM
This sustainable hotel is one another impressive work that architecture has been done. The basic idea itself is impressive considering its built in a cave over a waterfall and 3 storeys of them were beneath the water. However, the most important thing is this hotel generates their own energy which is incredible considering most new hotel nowadays have to promote their sustainability in the future. We can't wait to see the hotel to be finish and ready to use.
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Stunning map charts every river in U.S.

Stunning map charts every river in U.S. | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
The U.S. is often thought of as a nation connected by roads—since the 1960s the Interstate Highway has defined American culture and led to untold economic prosperity. But a new map of the nation’s rivers tells a very different story.

Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

Seeing this map really shows why almost all places in the U.S. have been inhabited before the industrial era.

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Linda Alexander's curator insight, July 9, 2013 3:24 AM

Water, water everywhere; Mark Twain would be thrilled...!

Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, July 12, 2013 7:21 AM

Seriously, I could stare at this map all day.  It is REALLY cool.  I'm thinking of all kinds of discussion it could bring to the classroom!

Louis Culotta's comment, July 15, 2013 6:52 AM
this is a very cool way to get a good look at our nations river systems and how to best use them for productive and environmental safety of them.
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What Antarctica Looks Like Under All That Ice

What Antarctica Looks Like Under All That Ice | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
John Blunnie's insight:

Nasa might not be going to space anymore but they are still doing amazing things. This 3-d representation of the "hidden continent" is breathtaking and a marvel of modern technology. I personally expected a much flatter landscape rather than the mountainous region shown.

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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

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Kaylin Burleson's curator insight, June 16, 2013 1:44 PM
What a good way to get the students thinking and questioning while using this fun set of maps.
Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 1:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 4:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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3 Clues To How Geography Fuels Innovation : NPR

3 Clues To How Geography Fuels Innovation : NPR | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it
Forget the notion of great inventors toiling in isolation. There's plenty of proof that geography has a big influence on innovation, with some cities inspiring far more innovation than others.
John Blunnie's insight:

The theory that lone brilliant minds changed the world seems to not have much truth behind it. It seems that the world's 40 largest urban areas produce two-thirds of global economic output and 9 out of 10 patents.

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