Blunnie's Geo Portfolio
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Rescooped by John Blunnie from Geography Education
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Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data

Finding the True Border Between Yankee and Red Sox Nation Using Facebook Data | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it

"By using Facebook data from the 2.5 million people in New York or New England that ‘like’ either the Red Sox or Yankees I was able to create a more accurate rivalry map than ever before."


Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

A fun map i can relate to a lot being a New Yorker living in RI. I also believe theres more Yankee fans in Red Sox territory then Red Sox fans in Yankee territory.

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Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 6:26 AM

Pretty neat use of mapping and facebook to create this. This map is around the idea of what i expected it to look like with a few exceptions. As a yankee fan i expected a little bit more out of fellow Rhode Islanders when it came to the distribution but i guess i was wrong. i would also like to point out that cultural diversity probably has a role to play in this, with western connecticut being more ethnically diverse than eastern.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, September 15, 2015 8:13 AM

This map pretty much met my general expectations for the size of Red Sox's and Yankee Nations. Most of New England is clearly Red Sox Nation. As a Yankee fan living in hostile territory, I was heartened to know that Yankee territory is not all that far away.  Connecticut is the true battleground in the fight for more territory. That state serves as the crossroads between New England values and culture, and New York values and culture. I think this map says a lot more about New York and New England than just who supports each baseball team. Sports is often a window into our lives and habits. If you asked me to divide New England from New York, I would probably divide it along these lines.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 6, 2015 4:53 PM

This is a pretty interesting map, I am unsure though if using Facebook is actually an accurate tool of determination for the Yankees and Red Sox borders, but I guess it is alright if someone is just trying to figure out a general idea of what fans live where in the North East. As assumed, most of New England was going to be fans of the Red Sox, and as the more west you went toward NY, that it would change to the Yankees. Clearly though, after looking through the article, Connecticut is where the battle hits hardest, Eastern Conn likes the Red Sox, Western Conn likes the Yankees, with a mix toward the middle. What I find quite interesting though is the map of the Mass/NY line how it shows instantly a diving line between the two teams without crossing borders. 

Rescooped by John Blunnie from Geography Education
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Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America?

Do You Live In IHOP America Or Waffle House America? | Blunnie's Geo Portfolio | Scoop.it

There is a pretty ridiculous North-South split, although Maryland, northern Virginia, and southern Florida (which is pretty much the North anyways) fall into pancake territory, while Waffle House has made inroads into Ohio and Indiana.


Via Seth Dixon
John Blunnie's insight:

I remember seeing a Waffle House across from a Waffle house int he middle of nowhere Georgia. Now i know why, its the center of WaffleHouse country.

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Hye-Hyun Kang's curator insight, January 9, 2014 11:35 PM

This article basically shows that South prefer waffles than pancakes. Although, there's very small part of Texas that prefers waffles over pancakes. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 13, 2014 1:13 PM

This map shows how divided north and south are in terms of Pancakes and waffles, with Pancakes having a larger reach than waffles, and showing how regional differences are effected by something as odd as fast food.

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 12, 2014 10:05 PM

I have never been to a Waffle House and I hate IHOP. I chose this article because the map popped out at me. It was like an IHOP take over with a poor Waffle House in the middle. However, it is interesting to see that when you open the article, the IHOP density comes out to  1,543, while Waffle House density comes out to 1,661. By looking at this map, you would think that IHOP would have the bigger density. Waffle House gets most of its business from states in the South, while IHOP seems to be all over the place, Northern and Southern states.