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Shell oil drilling platform stranded in sensitive Arctic region

Shell oil drilling platform stranded in sensitive Arctic region | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The multinational oil giant Shell is facing fresh criticism of its Arctic offshore oil drilling programme, after one of its platforms was left stranded in an environmentally sensitive area of the Alaskan coast.
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History repeats itself and we do not learn much from rote learning. 

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Our fragile world and its wonderful wildlife
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Horrific scenes on Gower beach as 70 dead sharks washed up on shoreline

Horrific scenes on Gower beach as 70 dead sharks washed up on shoreline | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A marine biologist believes the deaths may be the result of indiscriminate seabed trawling

Via Gaye Rosier
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Illegal shark fins discovered at exclusive London Chinese restaurant

Illegal shark fins discovered at exclusive London Chinese restaurant | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A stock of illegally imported shark fins has been confiscated from one of Britain’s most exclusive Chinese restaurants and destroyed by Trading Standards, following a report in The Independent.

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Gaye Rosier's curator insight, April 20, 12:33 PM

Pandering to and profiting from the appetites of the rich. 

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Geelong Star fishing vessel arrives, reigniting super trawler debate

Geelong Star fishing vessel arrives, reigniting super trawler debate | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The arrival of a 95-metre long fishing and freezer trawler in Western Australia reignites debate over the environmental hazards large vessels pose to marine life.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Big , shiny and deadly; industrial scale trawling takes no prisoners and may cause huge disruption to marine life.

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BLUE Provide An Insight Into The World's Largest Marine Reserve

BLUE Provide An Insight Into The World's Largest Marine Reserve | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Today, it was announced in the budget that the British government intends to create the world's largest marine reserve around Pitcairn in the Pacific. BLUE has released a report to provide us with a deeper insight into the fight behind creating this unique marine reserve.
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Good News for the seas around the Pitcairn Islands.  Healthy Oceans will need more large areas where marine biodiversity can flourish.

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EUROPEAN UNION: TACS and Quotas 2015

EUROPEAN UNION: TACS and Quotas 2015 | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

A new poster is on-line

 

Get this document: http://ec.europa.eu/fisheries/documentation/publications/poster_tac2015_en.pdf

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This High-Tech, Biodegradable Fishing Net Could Help Save Dolphins and Whales

This High-Tech, Biodegradable Fishing Net Could Help Save Dolphins and Whales | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A Spanish inventor hopes to replace abandoned "ghost nets" that kill marine mammals and other sea life.

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Helena Bonham Carter joins calls for vast UK marine reserves - Blue and Green Tomorrow

Helena Bonham Carter joins calls for vast UK marine reserves - Blue and Green Tomorrow | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
The UK government is being urged to create vast marine reserves around three overseas territories from a group of more than 100 individuals and organisatio
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The UK government has a poor home record for marine protection, let's see if it can do better overseas.

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RESEARCH ARTICLE: Effects of Ocean Acidification on Temperate Coastal Marine Ecosystems and Fisheries in the Northeast Pacific

RESEARCH ARTICLE: Effects of Ocean Acidification on Temperate Coastal Marine Ecosystems and Fisheries in the Northeast Pacific | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

Abstract


As the oceans absorb anthropogenic CO2 they become more acidic, a problem termed ocean acidification (OA). Since this increase in CO2 is occurring rapidly, OA may have profound implications for marine ecosystems. In the temperate northeast Pacific, fisheries play key economic and cultural roles and provide significant employment, especially in rural areas. In British Columbia (BC), sport (recreational) fishing generates more income than commercial fishing (including the expanding aquaculture industry). Salmon (fished recreationally and farmed) and Pacific Halibut are responsible for the majority of fishery-related income. This region naturally has relatively acidic (low pH) waters due to ocean circulation, and so may be particularly vulnerable to OA. We have analyzed available data to provide a current description of the marine ecosystem, focusing on vertical distributions of commercially harvested groups in BC in the context of local carbon and pH conditions. We then evaluated the potential impact of OA on this temperate marine system using currently available studies. Our results highlight significant knowledge gaps. Above trophic levels 2–3 (where most local fishery-income is generated), little is known about the direct impact of OA, and more importantly about the combined impact of multi-stressors, like temperature, that are also changing as our climate changes. There is evidence that OA may have indirect negative impacts on finfish through changes at lower trophic levels and in habitats. In particular, OA may lead to increased fish-killing algal blooms that can affect the lucrative salmon aquaculture industry. On the other hand, some species of locally farmed shellfish have been well-studied and exhibit significant negative direct impacts associated with OA, especially at the larval stage. We summarize the direct and indirect impacts of OA on all groups of marine organisms in this region and provide conclusions, ordered by immediacy and certainty.

 About the Authors 

Rowan Haigh, Carrie A. Holt, Holly E. Neate, Andrew M. Edwards - Pacific Biological Station, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 3190 Hammond Bay Road, Nanaimo, British Columbia, V9T 6N7, Canada

 

Debby Ianson - Institute of Ocean Sciences, Fisheries and Oceans Canada, 9860 West Saanich Road, Sidney, British Columbia, V8L 4B2, Canada

 

Holly E. Neate, Andrew M. Edwards - Department of Biology, University of Victoria, P.O. Box 1700, Station CSC, Victoria, British Columbia, V8W 2Y2, Canada

 

Corresponding Author

 

Email: debby.ianson@dfo-mpo.gc.ca

 

Competing Interests

 

The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

 

Author Contributions

 

Conceived and designed the experiments: DI RH CH AE. Performed the experiments: RH CH DI AE HN. Analyzed the data: DI RH CH AE. Wrote the paper: DI RH CH AE.

 

 

 

Download PDF: http://www.plosone.org/article/fetchObject.action?uri=info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pone.0117533&representation=PDF

 

 

PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.

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Scientists alarmed by rise in dolphin strandings on Irish shores

Scientists alarmed by rise in dolphin strandings on Irish shores | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Nearly 20 dolphins have been found stranded on beaches since the start of the year

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Marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction - The Malaysian Insider

Marine biodiversity beyond national jurisdiction - The Malaysian Insider | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
An important meeting will take place from January 20-23, 2015 at the United Nations (UN) HQ in New York. This is one of a series of meetings of the UN-established…
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The oceans are of fundamental importance at the levels of both the planet and the plate.  Protecting marine biodiversity has major importance at both levels.  

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For sea turtles, there's no place like magnetic home

For sea turtles, there's no place like magnetic home | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Adult sea turtles find their way back to the beaches where they hatched by seeking out unique magnetic signatures along the coast, according to new evidence.

Via Gaye Rosier
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The dead leatherback turtle that  I saw washed ashore in #Gloucestershire in the early '90s had probably been feeding in the Bristol Channel approaches before its demise.

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ICELAND: Traditional small boat Icelandic lumpfish fishery is MSC certified

ICELAND: Traditional small boat Icelandic lumpfish fishery is MSC certified | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

The world's first lumpfish fishery achieves MSC certification in Iceland.

 

Iceland’s lumpfish fishery has been MSC certified as a sustainable and well-managed fishery. The 330 small boats are the first MSC certified lumpfish fishery in the world.

 

Lumpfish has been harvested for centuries inside the Icelandic Exclusive Economic Zone. Male and female lumpfish are easily distinguished both in colour and size, where females are larger.

 

The big mesh size gillnets fishery mainly targets the females for their roe, which is exported as a luxury caviar mainly to European countries. There is also a growing Chinese market for the female fish while male lumpfish is less frequently caught, mostly for traditional local consumption.

 

Stable stocks

 

The lumpfish distributed between Iceland and Norway is one of three genetically distinct stocks of lumpfish in the North Atlantic. Although some other lumpfish stocks have faced challenges, the Icelandic lumpfish fisheries have been relatively stable since 1990.

 

The lumpfish fishery is controlled by various measures that include restrictions regarding the number of licenses and nets, a fishing season of three months only as well as limitations on vessel and mesh sizes.

 

Delicate ecosystems

 

Icelandic waters contain a wide range of delicate ecosystems, mostly in deep water. The static bottom-set gillnets used in the lumpfish fishery have minimal contact with these ecosystems as the fishery mainly takes place on a rocky sea bed in shallow waters.

 

The fishery’s main bycatch is the MSC certified cod (Gadus morhua), representing around five per cent of the total catch. All bycatches are landed as discarding is prohibited in Iceland.

 

A world first

 

The client, Vignir G. Jónsson hf., was a family run business founded in 1970 but is now a subsidiary of the seafood company HBGrandi. The headquarters and main processing site of Vignir are in the town of Akranes, with a staff of about 40, but they also operate in east coast of Iceland. Vignir CEO, Mr. Eíríkur Vignisson says: “I’m happy that this assessment is now completed.

 

All lumpfish fisheries in N-Atlantic were last year listed as red by many of the eNGO traffic light systems. That was a huge disappointment for the industry but I hope this certification will contribute to the Icelandic lumpfish products falling under the green category. It is important for the industry to be able to demonstrate to overseas buyers that our products originate from a truly sustainable fishery.”

 

Gisli Gislason, MSC Manager for the North Atlantic said: “Lumpfish roe is an important product for European markets and this is the first lumpfish fishery in the world to get MSC certified. This is the only traditional fishery in Iceland exclusively performed by small vessels.

 

Close cooperation between the authorities and the small boats association is vital to protect the marine environment and ensure lumpfish stocks are stable for the future. MSC certification provides independent reassurance for consumers around the world that the lumpfish roe comes from a sustainable fishery. We hope that this certification will in return incentivise other lumpfish fisheries to enter the MSC program.”

 

More Information

 

For media enquiries, please contact: media@msc.org.

Gordon McGlone's insight:

Well managed independently certified fisheries are critical to the future of marine food supply for this crowded planet.  Lumpfish is a  niche luxury food but the principles of this fishery stock management show that it can work over the long time frame that sustainability requires.

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Ocean Acidification Causing Pacific Oyster Die Off : DNews

Ocean Acidification Causing Pacific Oyster Die Off : DNews | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
“ Oysters are sensitive to increasingly corrosive seawater, and it's causing commercial oyster operations to fail.”
Via Kathy Dowsett
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The ocean gives us $24trillion - and we take, take, take

The ocean gives us $24trillion - and we take, take, take | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
If you had a savings account that yielded a 10 per cent return, you’d presumably keep adding to that account as much as you could. Our oceans are worth a staggering $24 trillion, yielding a huge $2.5 trillion a year in goods and services, according to our new report published today - and that’s a conservative estimate. Yet we are not restoring or protecting them nearly enough. Put another way, we’re not investing in the growth and security of this asset. 
Gordon McGlone's insight:

The wrecking of the oceans is a global scale slow motion train crash.  The inevitability of system collapse is inevitable at this rate of human marine pillage.  

The UK can not hold its head high in this matter, the Whitehall government claims marine conservation success but overlooks the shambles of the Marine Conservation Zone  initiative.  

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Conservation Society send a strong message to Minister

Conservation Society send a strong message to Minister | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
THE Australian Marine Conservation Society sent a clear message to the Government to improve protection of the Great Barrier Reef or risk irreversible damage.
Gordon McGlone's insight:

A global biodiversity asset stands at risk of being exploited for Australian national short term current account profits.  Value Nature don't rip it off.

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First global review on the status, future of Arctic marine mammals

First global review on the status, future of Arctic marine mammals | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A multinational team surveys the status of all Arctic marine mammals, including whales, walruses, seals and polar bears. The report is a first effort to assess the status of 78 subpopulations and recommend measures to protect these species under climate change.

Via Gaye Rosier
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Sound knowledge of the status of species is key to their future conservation.

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Gaye Rosier's curator insight, March 23, 9:42 AM

They also need protecting from invasion by oil and gas companies.

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EUROPEAN UNION: North East Atlantic fisheries more sustainable in 2015

EUROPEAN UNION: North East Atlantic fisheries more sustainable in 2015 | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

The number of fisheries exploited by the European Union at maximum sustainable yield (MSY) levels is increasing in the East Atlantic, North Sea and Baltic Sea.

 

In 2014 there were 27 fisheries, while the projection for 2015 would add 9 more if fishing quotas decided by the Agriculture and Fisheries Council last December are respected.

 

This improvement is the result of strong efforts by the European fishing industry, the TACs agreed by Member States in line with the scientific advice, better controls, more dialogue and trust among stakeholders.

 

With the reform of the Common Fisheries Policy in 2014, this number is expected to increase further, in particular with the entry into force of the new landing obligations and multiannual management plans.

 

 

EU fisheries in the Atlantic, North Sea and Baltic Sea in line with maximum sustainable yield (MSY) – January 2015: http://ec.europa.eu/fisheries/documentation/publications/documents/eu-fisheries-n-e-atlantic-msy-jan-2015_en.pdf

 

 

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Rare 25ft Arctic bowhead whale spotted off British coast for first time ever

Rare 25ft Arctic bowhead whale spotted off British coast for first time ever | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A bowhead whale has been spotted for the first time ever off the British coast - 2,000 miles from home. The whale was spotted by resident and diver...

Via Kathy Dowsett
Gordon McGlone's insight:

Wildlife discovery!

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Sardines move north due to ocean warming

Sardines move north due to ocean warming | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Sardines, anchovies and mackerels play a crucial role in marine ecosystems, as well as having a high commercial value. However, the warming of waters makes them vanish from their usual seas and migrate north, as confirmed by a pioneering study analysing 57,000 fish censuses from 40 years. The researchers warn that coastal towns dependent on these fishery resources must adapt their economies.

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Gaye Rosier's curator insight, February 19, 2:16 PM

L'Escala is famous for its anchovies but catches are much smaller now.

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PUBLICATION: Review of current fisheries management performance and conservation measures in the WECAFC area

PUBLICATION: Review of current fisheries management performance and conservation measures in the WECAFC area | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

This technical paper provides an inventory of, and describes trends in, legal, administrative and management frameworks in place for managing marine capture fisheries in the Western Central Atlantic Fishery Commission (WECAFC) area.

 

This review includes 16 countries and overseas territories and is part of an ongoing process initiated by FAO to report on the state of world marine capture fisheries management. The review identifies a number of challenges in fisheries management, including: inadequate legislation; ad hoc management processes and plans; uncoordinated monitoring and enforcement; non-management-driven scientific information; insufficient stakeholder identification and participation, conflict resolution and fishing capacity measurements; limited incorporation of issues pertaining to the operation of multispecies fisheries and use of the ecosystem approach; unequal application of management tools and measures across fisheries subsectors; and rising fisheries management costs coupled with stagnant budgets for governments.

 

Actions are listed to address the challenges, and specific recommendations are made to address legislative issues, apply participatory approaches and implement a successful fisheries management process.

 

The fifteenth session of WECAFC (March 2014) endorsed the review outcomes and adopted recommendation WECAFC/15/2014/4 “on strengthening fisheries management planning in the WECAFC area”. This technical paper aims to inform fishery policy decision-makers, fishery managers and other stakeholders with interest in fisheries in the Wider Caribbean Region.

 

Year of publication: 2015 Document Type: Book Pages: 293 p. Job Number: I4255 Office: Fisheries and Aquaculture Department Author: Singh-Renton, S.  Download: http://www.fao.org/3/a-i4255e.pdf ;

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Ocean Trash: 5.25 Trillion Pieces and Counting, but Big Questions Remain

Ocean Trash: 5.25 Trillion Pieces and Counting, but Big Questions Remain | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
A recent study of ocean trash counted a staggering 5.25 trillion pieces of plastic at loose in the seas. Here's what we know-and don't know-so far.

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Isabel Hilton's curator insight, February 23, 5:59 PM
5.25 trillion reasons to give up plastic for Lent!
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BANGLADESH: Report shows poor benefit from commercial aquaculture

BANGLADESH: Report shows poor benefit from commercial aquaculture | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

A new report from WorldFish shows that resource-poor Bangladeshis can participate in commercial aquaculture, challenging conventional assumptions that this was not possible. The report also highlights that more of the very poor in Bangladesh are profiting from commercial aquaculture than was previously thought.

 Aquaculture, employment, poverty, food security and well-being in Bangladesh: A comparative study (http://www.worldfishcenter.org/resource_centre/AAS-2014-39.pdf), finds that where a critical mass of aquaculture producers had formed in a particular region, the development of related infrastructure reduced costs and lowered barriers to entry for other producers. In those areas, the potential of aquaculture to generate significant returns was sufficiently attractive to make the risks of investing in it appear acceptable to resource-poor households. In the study, more small landowners and resource-poor farmers were shown to practice commercial aquaculture than semi-subsistence forms, for example from household ponds.   The study found greater social and economic benefits in small and medium sized aquaculture enterprises as opposed to smaller scale or household operations. Commercially-oriented aquaculture producers, the report also found, derived nutritional benefit by consuming larger quantities of fish from their own farms than households operating backyard operations. Stephen Hall, Director General, WorldFish: “By identifying the modes of aquaculture that most benefits the poor we can best direct efforts to bolster this sector. While we have seen the detrimental effects of large scale aquaculture for communities it is now clearer that the benefits of smaller scale commercial operations are potentially great in increasing food security and employment.”  Authored by WorldFish’s Ben Belton, Nasib Ahmed and Murshed-e-Jahan the study also found that employment generated by aquaculture is generally higher than for other forms of agriculture, particularly those that are more seasonal, such as rice production. Commercial smallholder operations were found to create the highest levels of direct employment and in a wide range of supporting occupations, for example pond diggers and providers of transport. The study was conducted via an integrated quantative/qualitative survey in six communities with contrasting patterns of aquaculture development. Aquaculture, employment, poverty, food security and well-being in Bangladesh: A comparative study is a product of the CGIAR Research Programs (CRP) on Aquatic Agricultural Systems in which WorldFish participates as well as an output of the EU funded Aquaculture for food security, poverty alleviation and nutrition project. For more information or to request an interview:Contact: Toby Johnson, Senior Media Relations ManagerMobile Tel: +60 (0) 175 124 606Email: t.johnson@cgiar.orgWeb: worldfishcenter.orgPhotography: flickr.com/photos/theworldfishcenter/ About WorldFishWorldFish is an international, nonprofit research organization that harnesses the potential of fisheries and aquaculture to reduce hunger and poverty. Globally, more than one billion poor people obtain most of their animal protein from fish and 800 million depend on fisheries and aquaculture for their livelihoods. WorldFish is a member of CGIAR, a global research partnership for a food-secure future. About CGIAR

CGIAR is a global research partnership for a food-secure future. Its science is carried out by the 15 research Centers that are members of the CGIAR Consortium in collaboration with hundreds of partners.

 

 

 

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Sea levels rising faster than previously thought says new study

Sea levels rising faster than previously thought says new study | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Assessment of 600 tidal gauges across the globe suggests a 25% greater acceleration in the rise over the past 20 years

Via Kathy Dowsett
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EVENT: 20 January 2015, Porto Portugal - Atlantic Stakeholder Platform Conference

EVENT: 20 January 2015, Porto Portugal - Atlantic Stakeholder Platform Conference | Blue Planet | Scoop.it

Key players from across the maritime sector will come together in Porto on 20th January to share ideas and unlock funding for projects under the Atlantic Maritime Strategy Action Plan.

 

This first annual Atlantic Stakeholder Platform Conference, jointly organised by the European Commission and the Directorate-General for Maritime Policy of the Portuguese Ministry of Agriculture and Sea, will act as a catalyst for getting joint projects in Atlantic Ocean area off the ground to start delivering the jobs and growth the region needs.

 

Over 400 participants will take part in twenty stakeholder-led workshops on topics covering the entire spectrum of the maritime sector including aquaculture, marine biotech, marine litter, maritime safety, coastal tourism and territorial cooperation in the Atlantic. All of themes reflect the priorities agreed under the Atlantic Action Plan to drive the 'blue economy' forward.

 

The marine and maritime sectors that make up the 'blue economy' have the potential to provide more jobs by 2020. These jobs will be found not only in emerging sectors, such as offshore renewable energy, but also through revitalising traditional maritime industries. The Atlantic area can make a significant contribution to this 'blue growth'.

 

This Action Plan, part of the Commission's Atlantic Strategy, sets out priorities for research and investment to drive the ‘blue economy’ forwards in the Atlantic area. The EU's Atlantic countries will draw on the plan to help create sustainable and inclusive growth in coastal areas.

 

The event will be opened by Mr. Rui Moreira, Mayor of Porto who will speak alongside  Hon. Manuel Pinto de Abreu, Secretary of State for the Sea of the Portuguese Government, Ms Lowri Evans, Director General for Maritime Affairs and Fisheries at the European Commission, Mr Emídio Gomes, President of the Regional Development and Coordination Commission of the North Region, and Mr Ricardo Serrão Santos, Member of the European Parliament.

 

More information


Full programme details: http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/policy/sea_basins/atlantic_ocean/atlanticforum/events-2015/porto/index_en.htm

 

EU’s Atlantic Strategy: http://ec.europa.eu/maritimeaffairs/policy/sea_basins/atlantic_ocean/index_en.htm

 

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England's marine conservation network is worse than useless | Callum Roberts

England's marine conservation network is worse than useless | Callum Roberts | Blue Planet | Scoop.it
Callum Roberts: Marine conservation policy has drifted far off its original course – but there is still a way to save our seas

Via Gaye Rosier
Gordon McGlone's insight:

UK is a poor performer on the World marine conservation stage.

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