Better Collaboration: By Blrt
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Skype Opens Up Free Video-Conferencing For Up To 10 People on Win, Mac, Xbox


Via Robin Good
Alex's insight:
Pretty cool! Blrt would work better for short presentation though
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Profeserio's curator insight, September 28, 2014 11:59 AM

@Edumorfosis La muerte anunciada de Skipe por parte de Microsoft, no es una realidad por su esfuerzo disruptivo de ser la herramienta on line de encuentro entre pares.

Temía su desaparición luego de la compra del producto, pero veo que esta en pleno auge....

Carlos Rodrigues Cadre's curator insight, September 29, 2014 10:40 AM

adicionar a sua visão ...

Laura Salas's curator insight, November 22, 2015 11:26 AM

This is yet another great tool to take advantage of when collaborating. Not only is it free for up to 10 connections but everyone has access to it and it's easy to use.

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The Marshmallow Challenge: What We Can Learn From Kindergarten Students About Team Collaboration

The Marshmallow Challenge: What We Can Learn From Kindergarten Students About Team Collaboration | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
How can you get your eLearning team working together effectively? Try these tips learned from the Marshmallow Challenge.

Via basil60
Alex's insight:
Great insight about team collaboration, using a hilarious example!
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8 Best Apps for Team Collaboration

8 Best Apps for Team Collaboration | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it

As more and more apps utilize the cloud's file-storing and -sharing capabilities, remote team collaboration becomes even easier.


There are hundred of apps that claim to "increase productivity" and "optimize company workflow," but how many apps actually do? Mashable has selected a list of 8 apps that actually make your workday easier, and team collaboration more enjoyable in the process.


Via The Learning Factor
Alex's insight:
Some great team collaboration tools here. Interesting that alot of them are centred around Asynchronous communication :)
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, July 15, 2013 5:38 PM

Mashable has selected a list of 8 apps that actually make your workday easier, and team collaboration more enjoyable in the process.

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Six Spaces Required for Effective Collaboration

Six Spaces Required for Effective Collaboration | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it

What makes collaboration work? The first thought probably centers on the workplace design. Many articles have been written and offices showcased on how space can help facilitate conversations and give people the flexibility to solve problems together.

 


Via Kenneth Mikkelsen, Walter Gassenferth, Ron McIntyre
Alex's insight:
interesting take on the different 'spaces' required for making collaboration work in companies
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Walter Gassenferth's curator insight, September 8, 2016 9:52 AM
Lucid post, presenting an interesting concept. For those who speak Portuguese or Spanish and are interested in continuing education, please visit http://www.quanticaconsultoria.com
Ron McIntyre's curator insight, September 8, 2016 12:11 PM

Some excellent insights on collaboration worth reviewing.

Bronwyn Burke's curator insight, January 28, 4:56 AM
Planning for the future in middle years geog.
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Apple tucks in a bet on real-time collaboration

Apple tucks in a bet on real-time collaboration | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it

"Let's take a moment to consider the Apple news that isn't getting much attention ..."


Via Leona Ungerer
Alex's insight:
Apple's now tackling the problem of real time collaboration!
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3 Easy Steps to Make Creativity Thrive

3 Easy Steps to Make Creativity Thrive | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
Protecting your mindspace, defeating the decision fatigue superbug, and making a creative workplace work for you.

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
Alex's insight:
Love the axe analogy - I also got that lesson in Boy Scouts!
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The Secret Ingredient for Exceptional Mental Toughness

The Secret Ingredient for Exceptional Mental Toughness | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it

We tend to think of people who have true grit and exceptional perseverance as hard -- they have a thick enough skin and strong enough emotional defenses that whatever life throws at them, it simply bounces off.

 

If you view mental toughness through this prism, it's easy enough to extrapolate how to develop more of it -- challenge yourself, take more knocks, and you'll learn to persevere even when it hurts. But according to a couple of thought-provoking recent articles, this is the pretty much the exact opposite of the truth about real resilience.

 

The heart of exceptional mental toughness, these writers argue, isn't the ability to shut the world out, but a desire to engage it. True grit comes from passion -- from love -- not from emotional hardness.

 


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 11, 2016 6:42 PM

The foundation of exceptional grit isn't what you think.

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How can leaders create a company culture where criticism is less personal and more productive?

How can leaders create a company culture where criticism is less personal and more productive? | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
How to quash bad ideas without stifling innovation.

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
Alex's insight:
Finding ways to remove ego and make processes less personal is great advice in many contexts - especially so here.
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What Great Listeners Actually Do

What Great Listeners Actually Do
Jack ZengerJoseph Folkman
JULY 14, 2016

Chances are you think you’re a good listener. People’s appraisal of their listening ability is much like their assessment of their driving skills, in that the great bulk of adults think they’re above average.

In our experience, most people think good listening comes down to doing three things:

Not talking when others are speaking
Letting others know you’re listening through facial expressions and verbal sounds (“Mmm-hmm”)
Being able to repeat what others have said, practically word-for-word
In fact, much management advice on listening suggests doing these very things – encouraging listeners to remain quiet, nod and “mm-hmm” encouragingly, and then repeat back to the talker something like, “So, let me make sure I understand. What you’re saying is…” However, recent research that we conducted suggests that these behaviors fall far short of describing good listening skills.

We analyzed data describing the behavior of 3,492 participants in a development program designed to help managers become better coaches. As part of this program, their coaching skills were assessed by others in 360-degree assessments. We identified those who were perceived as being the most effective listeners (the top 5%). We then compared the best listeners to the average of all other people in the data set and identified the 20 items showing the largest significant difference. With those results in hand we identified the differences between great and average listeners and analyzed the data to determine what characteristics their colleagues identified as the behaviors that made them outstanding listeners.

We found some surprising conclusions, along with some qualities we expected to hear. We grouped them into four main findings:

Good listening is much more than being silent while the other person talks. To the contrary, people perceive the best listeners to be those who periodically ask questions that promote discovery and insight. These questions gently challenge old assumptions, but do so in a constructive way. Sitting there silently nodding does not provide sure evidence that a person is listening, but asking a good question tells the speaker the listener has not only heard what was said, but that they comprehended it well enough to want additional information. Good listening was consistently seen as a two-way dialog, rather than a one-way “speaker versus hearer” interaction. The best conversations were active.
Good listening included interactions that build a person’s self-esteem. The best listeners made the conversation a positive experience for the other party, which doesn’t happen when the listener is passive (or, for that matter, critical!). Good listeners made the other person feel supported and conveyed confidence in them. Good listening was characterized by the creation of a safe environment in which issues and differences could be discussed openly.
Good listening was seen as a cooperative conversation. In these interactions, feedback flowed smoothly in both directions with neither party becoming defensive about comments the other made. By contrast, poor listeners were seen as competitive — as listening only to identify errors in reasoning or logic, using their silence as a chance to prepare their next response. That might make you an excellent debater, but it doesn’t make you a good listener. Good listeners may challenge assumptions and disagree, but the person being listened to feels the listener is trying to help, not wanting to win an argument.
Good listeners tended to make suggestions. Good listening invariably included some feedback provided in a way others would accept and that opened up alternative paths to consider. This finding somewhat surprised us, since it’s not uncommon to hear complaints that “So-and-so didn’t listen, he just jumped in and tried to solve the problem.” Perhaps what the data is telling us is that making suggestions is not itself the problem; it may be the skill with which those suggestions are made. Another possibility is that we’re more likely to accept suggestions from people we already think are good listeners. (Someone who is silent for the whole conversation and then jumps in with a suggestion may not be seen as credible. Someone who seems combative or critical and then tries to give advice may not be seen as trustworthy.)
While many of us have thought of being a good listener being like a sponge that accurately absorbs what the other person is saying, instead, what these findings show is that good listeners are like trampolines. They are someone you can bounce ideas off of — and rather than absorbing your ideas and energy, they amplify, energize, and clarify your thinking. They make you feel better not merely passively absorbing, but by actively supporting. This lets you gain energy and height, just like someone jumping on a trampoline.

Of course, there are different levels of listening. Not every conversation requires the highest levels of listening, but many conversations would benefit from greater focus and listening skill. Consider which level of listening you’d like to aim for:

 

Level 1: The listener creates a safe environment in which difficult, complex, or emotional issues can be discussed.

 

Level 2: The listener clears away distractions like phones and laptops, focusing attention on the other person and making appropriate eye-contact. (This behavior not only affects how you are perceived as the listener; it immediately influences the listener’s own attitudes and inner feelings. Acting the part changes how you feel inside. This in turn makes you a better listener.)

 

Level 3: The listener seeks to understand the substance of what the other person is saying. They capture ideas, ask questions, and restate issues to confirm that their understanding is correct.


Level 4: The listener observes nonbverbal cues, such as facial expressions, perspiration, respiration rates, gestures, posture, and numerous other subtle body language signals. It is estimated that 80% of what we communicate comes from these signals. It sounds strange to some, but you listen with your eyes as well as your ears.

 

Level 5: The listener increasingly understands the other person’s emotions and feelings about the topic at hand, and identifies and acknowledges them. The listener empathizes with and validates those feelings in a supportive, nonjudgmental way.

 

Level 6: The listener asks questions that clarify assumptions the other person holds and helps the other person to see the issue in a new light. This could include the listener injecting some thoughts and ideas about the topic that could be useful to the other person. However, good listeners never highjack the conversation so that they or their issues become the subject of the discussion.

 

Each of the levels builds on the others; thus, if you’ve been criticized (for example) for offering solutions rather than listening, it may mean you need to attend to some of the other levels (such as clearing away distractions or empathizing) before your proffered suggestions can be appreciated.

We suspect that in being a good listener, most of us are more likely to stop short rather than go too far. Our hope is that this research will help by providing a new perspective on listening. We hope those who labor under an illusion of superiority about their listening skills will see where they really stand. We also hope the common perception that good listening is mainly about acting like an absorbent sponge will wane. Finally, we hope all will see that the highest and best form of listening comes in playing the same role for the other person that a trampoline plays for a child. It gives energy, acceleration, height and amplification. These are the hallmarks of great listening.


Via Linda Holroyd
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Linda Holroyd's curator insight, September 8, 2016 4:43 PM

Great thoughts on how to be a better listener

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28 Daily Habits for Success These Executives Swear By

28 Daily Habits for Success These Executives Swear By | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
The highest achieving people have figured out that doing the right things day in and out is a recipe for success.

Via Marc Wachtfogel, Ph.D.
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wow. Awesome read
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104 Photo Editing Tools You Should Know About

104 Photo Editing Tools You Should Know About | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
“ Hello, photographers. For the last two months, I've been doing market research for my project Photolemur and looking for different tools in the area of pho”
Via Luísa Lima, Juergen Wagner, LucianeCurator, massimo facchinetti
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some great photo editing tools to make you more productive at work! 
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9 Apps to Improve Productivity for Small Business Owners »

9 Apps to Improve Productivity for Small Business Owners » | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
Finding useful apps can be a daunting task. To save you from the trouble of searching, here are 9 apps to improve productivity for small business owners.
Via Skip Boykin
Alex's insight:
great productivity apps for small business owners
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Innovation 2016: Digital Technologies Propel Global Collaboration

Innovation 2016: Digital Technologies Propel Global Collaboration | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
The GII is more than a scorecard. It is also a guide for leaders navigating a new world of global innovation, and an inspiration for information executives at the intersection of business and technology.
Via Tony Shan
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Interesting points on tackling collaboration on a global level
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Only Have 15 Minutes A Day For Twitter Networking? Here's What To Do

Only Have 15 Minutes A Day For Twitter Networking? Here's What To Do | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it

I opened my Twitter account a few years ago, but for a while I didn't have much to show for it. As of April 27, 2014, I had never posted a single tweet and had a mere 85 followers.

From a professional standpoint, that was a problem. I'm the head of a sales training and consulting firm that specializes in applying behavioral science—the study of how the human brain makes choices—to business and sales. I knew I needed to communicate better with more prospective clients, and I wondered what would happen if I applied my science background to boosting my social media reach.

 

So I decided to set myself up as a guinea pig. But from the outset, I made one rule: I'd never spend more than 15 minutes a day on Twitter. Instead, I'd have to use some behavioral science–backed strategies to produce the greatest results in the shortest amount of time.


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 4, 2016 6:45 PM

This behavioral scientist harnessed the psychology of choice to grow his Twitter account from 85 to over 101,000 followers.

malek's curator insight, September 6, 2016 10:14 AM

focus on offering something genuinely valuable to the type of user who'd be valuable to have in your network or associated with your brand.

Nancy Allison's curator insight, September 9, 2016 1:17 PM
Good tips!
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Team Working: 10 Tips For Effective Real-Time Online Collaboration

Team Working: 10 Tips For Effective Real-Time Online Collaboration | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
Digital natives co-author articles, theses, and books online and in real-time. If you're still sending back and forth emails with file attachments to collaborate on a document, you're doing it wrong. Unless you share the same office, online collaborative writing is generally safer, more reliable, and more efficient than emails. On top of that it's…

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Tip #4 - Each member of your team has different skills. An efficient process will be based on people’s strengths. Assign responsibilities accordingly.
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Ethan Hawke’s Productivity Lesson: Set Simple Goals - YouTube


Via Enzo Calamo
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A wise productivity lesson from Ethan Hakwe: don't set complex goals. Make them simple and achievable 
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How Important Is Collaboration? | AUGI

How Important Is Collaboration? | AUGI | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
When employees are asked what their biggest complaint with their company is, a large percentage of the time they say it is a lack of communication. In the world of BIM, we have a similar issue, but we tend to call it a lack of collaboration.

Via oscar lopez
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great article on the importance of collaboration in organisations
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Common causes of project failure and how to fix them

Common causes of project failure and how to fix them | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
Project failure is not uncommon. In fact, if you do a little research you will see that a large percentage of projects end-up failing. A lot of factors contribute in untimely completion an

Via Jay
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Poor communication - one of the biggest reasons for project failure!
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Why Great Managers Are So Rare

Why Great Managers Are So Rare | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
One of the most important decisions companies make is whom they name manager. Yet Gallup research suggests they usually get it wrong -- costing businesses billions of dollars annually.

Via Ron McIntyre, Bobby Dillard
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Ron McIntyre's curator insight, September 10, 2016 7:56 AM

Some great insights on managers in today's business world. Note the cost of choosing the wrong managers.

Sandeep Gautam's curator insight, September 11, 2016 12:01 AM
only 1 in 10 employee has the potential to be a great manager.
Jerry Busone's curator insight, September 11, 2016 9:00 AM

Great read and reasons why a leadership development program is critical to  commons success. gallup gives the data. One of the most important decisions companies make is simply whom they name manager. Managers account for 70% of associate engagement . Yet companies get it wrong due to lack of consistency in how people are managed. A program helps define that and reduce the inconsistencies.. There are very few great leaders.LDP's help find those leaders through a selection process that adds a little science to the equation. Why a business would not have a section process, and development program is short sided in todays world. Read the article and data... enjoy

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Why the corporate world won’t adopt best practice from the Olympics

Why the corporate world won’t adopt best practice from the Olympics | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
Successful Olympians across disparate disciplines share a common motive: to be the best versions of themselves. To that end, who they are, is tightly interwoven with what they do.

This clarity of purpose shapes how they go about achieving their goals.

Via David Hain
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David Hain's curator insight, September 8, 2016 5:17 AM

Will the business world learn (this time!) for a world class Olympic effort. The lessons are well articulated here...

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16 Business Lessons from the World’s Oldest Brands [Infographic]

16 Business Lessons from the World’s Oldest Brands [Infographic] | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
16 valuable business lessons from some of the world's oldest brands including Barclay's, Colgate, Dr. Pepper, Cadbury, and more.

Via TechinBiz
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How To Rescue Your Attention Span From Information Overload

How To Rescue Your Attention Span From Information Overload | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
 

We like to know what’s going on. Eighty-seven percent of respondents to a December 2014 Pew Internet and American Life survey said that the internet and mobile phones help them learn new things, and 72% like having access to so much information.

 

But the information onslaught comes at a price, experts say. Information overload—trying to take in and respond to too much information—can cause forgetfulness, fatigue, and difficulty with focus, says psychologist and attention expert Lucy Jo Palladino, PhD, author of Find Your Focus Zone: An Effective New Plan to Defeat Distraction and Overload.

 

"We can listen to all of these motivational gurus who tell us we have unlimited potential, but the brain is a physical structure. It runs on biochemicals called neurotransmitters," she says. When those neurotransmitters are depleted because we overextend them, we run out of fuel.

 


Via The Learning Factor
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, September 8, 2016 6:42 PM

The average person's attention span is now less than that of a goldfish's. Stop the onslaught and regain your focus.

rodrick rajive lal's curator insight, September 11, 2016 5:55 AM
Have been feeling rather fatigued and tired these days in spite of not doing much physical work? Have noticed being rather irritable these days? Have been forgetting things more often these days? Have been having difficulty in sleeping  these days? If yes, the it might be because you are suffering from information overload! Yes you heard right!  The vast amount of information that we are accessing on our internet enabled devices is affecting our minds in a big way!
Adele Taylor's curator insight, September 11, 2016 6:14 PM
Maybe easier said then done?
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The 11 Tools You Need to Run Your Business From Anywhere

The 11 Tools You Need to Run Your Business From Anywhere | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
Want to get away from the office and still be able to run your business? Use these 11 tools.

Via TechinBiz
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awesome tools you can use to run your business from anywhere!
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A Cheat Sheet to Productivity Hacks for Entrepreneurs

A Cheat Sheet to Productivity Hacks for Entrepreneurs | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
Maximize your productivity by developing a keen focus on results-driven actions. Start with a priorities list.

Via Jay
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Awesome insight on hacking productivity as an entrepreneur!
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Ron Rubens's curator insight, June 15, 2016 12:18 PM

Good advice for anyone including non entrepreneurs 

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The 30 Best Productivity Apps Ever Created

The 30 Best Productivity Apps Ever Created | Better Collaboration: By Blrt | Scoop.it
Productivity is great. The more productive you are, the quicker you work. The quicker you work, the more you get done. The more you get done, the better you’ll feel about the time you’ve spent an…

Via Jay
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Wow! Comprehensive list of productivity tools
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How To Deliver A Killer Service Or Product Demonstration

Having a great product or service is only the beginning. Level up with our guide to delivering a killer service or product demonstration.
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Great tips on how to make an awesome product demo
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