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What Happens When the Teacher Stops Talking? A Simple and Effective Student Engagement Strategy

What Happens When the Teacher Stops Talking? A Simple and Effective Student Engagement Strategy | bloom's taxonomy | Scoop.it

On a recent school visit, I was discussing student engagement with a group of school leaders when a member of the group offered the following observation: "I think teachers are reluctant to turn the class over to a guided activity because they are concerned about classroom management."

 

My Response

 

Teachers cannot teach if they cannot manage classroom behavior. They know that and we know that. Unless we build teacher capacity to engage students in guided group activities, they will be reluctant to "stop talking" because they are afraid they will lose control. In other words, teachers must be taught what to do when they stop talking and students are working.

 

Remember, the brain that does the work does the learning. If we expect to dramatically increase the amount of student work and simultaneously decrease the amount of teacher talk, we must build the capacity of teachers to check for understanding and facilitate group processes while keeping all the students on-task.

 

Most teachers make the big mistake of spending too much time with a few individuals and while they are "fixing" those few students, the rest of the class gets off-task. It does not take long for teachers to figure out that this is not working and they revert back to their comfort zone and a teacher-centered style of instruction. 

 

Furthermore, the natural tendency to "fix" struggling students actually has the unintended consequence of creating "dependent" students, who quickly learn that, if they wait until the teacher stops talking to raise their hand, the teacher will come over and do their work for them. So, not only are were losing control of the class, but we are creating dependent learners who will not even attempt to complete the assignment because they know the teacher will bail them out.

 

Years of implementing a school wide instructional framework taught me that our teachers had to have a strategy for keeping students on-task and engaged while they circulated through the room. Fred Jones’s Praise, Prompt, and Leave (PPL) strategy is one that we found particularly useful for strengthening student engagement.


Keys to Implementation of PPL

 

We asked teachers to:

Begin the year using groups of two (collaborative pairs), which were easier to manage and easier to keep on-task.Chunk the lesson or task into smaller segments.Keep the outcome in mind. The goal was not to fix students, but rather to ensure that they were on-task and that the students demonstrated understanding of the task at hand.Don't let too many students get to far off course! When needed stop the group activity and re-teach a key point. The only way the teacher knows whether students are off course is to circulate throughout the classroom checking for understanding.Motion creates emotion. An effective teacher moved around the classroom with ease and did not get stuck instructing one or two students.Every 10-12 minutes of group activity refocus the students and point out any key concepts or share your observations.

 

Follow a simple three step process:

Praise - Point out where the student is and what the student has done so far.Prompt - Tell the student what to do next and that you will be back to check on them.Leave - Spend as little time with each student as possible. The goal is to check on the understanding of all students not to re-teach a few students.

 

For a more detailed explanation of Praise, Prompt, and Leave, follow this link: http://info.marygrove.edu/matblog/a-simple-and-effective-student-engagement-strategy-praise-prompt-and-leave

 

 


Via Mel Riddile, Nancy J. Herr
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Growth Mindset: A Driving Philosophy, Not Just a Tool

Growth Mindset: A Driving Philosophy, Not Just a Tool | bloom's taxonomy | Scoop.it
It's important to recognize that a growth mindset is an overall paradigm for personal development rather than a pedagogical tool for measuring academic accomplishment.

Via Nancy J. Herr
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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, September 16, 2014 8:51 PM

This articles explores growth mid sets for those who don't fit inside the cookie cutter. What can we do better? 

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H.O.T. / D.O.K.: Teaching Higher Order Thinking...

H.O.T. / D.O.K.: Teaching Higher Order Thinking... | bloom's taxonomy | Scoop.it
They challenge and engage students to demonstrate and communicate higher levels of thinking such as analysis and evaluation but also communicate their thinking and reasoning behind their responses and results.
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Striving for Higher-Order Thinking and Depth of...

Striving for Higher-Order Thinking and Depth of... | bloom's taxonomy | Scoop.it
“ A little over a year ago, I read Higher-order thinking is the exception rather than the norm for most classrooms on Scott McLeod's blog, Dangerously Irrelevant, and have been mulling it over, wondering if our school district is any different.” (Striving...
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When School Starts Up Again, What Skills Should Our Kids Be Learning? - Forbes

When School Starts Up Again, What Skills Should Our Kids Be Learning? - Forbes | bloom's taxonomy | Scoop.it
When School Starts Up Again, What Skills Should Our Kids Be Learning?
Forbes
You apply yourself, do your homework and perform well on tests in order to get into a prestigious university.
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Dipsticks: Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding

Dipsticks: Efficient Ways to Check for Understanding | bloom's taxonomy | Scoop.it
Through alternative formative assessment, teachers can check for student understanding without falling back on the tedious or intimidating pop quiz.

Via Nancy J. Herr
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Nancy J. Herr's curator insight, September 11, 2014 7:49 PM

Great formative assessment ideas! 

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Examples of Activities that Promote Higher Order Thinking | The Center for Teaching and Learning | UNC Charlotte

Examples of Activities that Promote Higher Order Thinking | The Center for Teaching and Learning | UNC Charlotte | bloom's taxonomy | Scoop.it
Concrete recommendations for Higher Order Thinking Skills from UNCC http://t.co/V27aVt4HMm #HOTS #mchs2point3things
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249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking

249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking | bloom's taxonomy | Scoop.it
249 Bloom's Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking (They're just words, but oh their power: 249 Bloom’s Taxonomy Verbs For Critical Thinking http://t.co/hSvqQ1Ov12
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H.O.T. / D.O.K.: Teaching Higher Order Thinking...

H.O.T. / D.O.K.: Teaching Higher Order Thinking... | bloom's taxonomy | Scoop.it
Clarifying and Personalizing a Definition of Rigor What is rigor?We’ve heard it’s what the Common Core State Standards have imbedded in their performance objectives.
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