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Sites για δωρεάν download προγραμμάτων με ασφάλεια

Sites για δωρεάν download προγραμμάτων με ασφάλεια | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Download δωρεάν προγραμμάτων από νόμιμες σελίδες που προσφέρουν κατά κατηγορία πολλά προγράμματα για Windows αλλά και apps για Android, Linux και Mac.
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Νέος Bookmark Manager για Chrome (Διαχειριστής Σελιδοδεικτών) - Sotostips

Νέος Bookmark Manager για Chrome (Διαχειριστής Σελιδοδεικτών) - Sotostips | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Ο Νέος Bookmark Manager για Chrome είναι επίσημη επέκταση από Google και αντικαθιστά τον παλιό bookmark manager
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8 Data-Driven Tips for Using Images in Blog Posts

8 Data-Driven Tips for Using Images in Blog Posts | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Articles with images get 94% more views than those without. Learn these data-driven tips to squeeze the most value out of images in your blog posts.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, November 1, 2014 1:54 AM

Get the picture? Visuals make your blogging more effective.

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Instagram Slang: A Guide to Becoming an Instagram Lingo NINJA

Instagram Slang: A Guide to Becoming an Instagram Lingo NINJA | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Confused by Instagram slang like #TBT, #Regram & #POTD? Have no fear! This Instagram lingo guide explains the difference between #WCW & #MCM & the rest.

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, November 1, 2014 2:50 AM

Confused by Instagram slang like #TBT, #Regram & #POTD? Have no fear! Aaron Lee's Instagram lingo guide explains the difference between #WCW & #MCM & the rest.

Courtney Cole's curator insight, November 1, 2014 7:12 AM

For those of us new to Instagram

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Μήπως μαζί με τη φωτογραφία μοιράζετε και την ακριβή τοποθεσία σας; - Sotostips

Μήπως μαζί με τη φωτογραφία μοιράζετε και την ακριβή τοποθεσία σας; - Sotostips | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Μια προσπάθεια ευαισθητοποίησης της κοινής γνώμης για ευαίσθητα δεδομένα που περιέχονται στις φωτογραφίες που κοινοποιούμε.
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Μήπως μαζί με τη φωτογραφία μοιράζετε και την ακριβή τοποθεσία σας; - Sotostips

Μήπως μαζί με τη φωτογραφία μοιράζετε και την ακριβή τοποθεσία σας; - Sotostips | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Μια προσπάθεια ευαισθητοποίησης της κοινής γνώμης για ευαίσθητα δεδομένα που περιέχονται στις φωτογραφίες που κοινοποιούμε.
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Μαζί με τη φωτογραφία μοιράζετε και την ακριβή τοποθεσία σας; http://goo.gl/qR1Xd3 #exif #iknowwhereyourcatlives

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Η Microsoft προγραμματίζει κρίσιμη ενημέρωση ασφαλείας την Τρίτη

Η Microsoft προγραμματίζει κρίσιμη ενημέρωση ασφαλείας την Τρίτη | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Κρίσιμη Ενημέρωση Ασφαλείας για Internet Explorer και Windows την Τρίτη 6/7. Τα Windows καλό είναι να είναι ρυθμισμένα σε αυτόματη ενημέρωση.
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Τα Windows καλό είναι να είναι ρυθμισμένα σε αυτόματη ενημέρωση και για το σημαντικό Windows / IE update της Τρίτης 8/7

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5 insanely powerful tools you won't believe can fit on a flash drive

5 insanely powerful tools you won't believe can fit on a flash drive | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Flash drives are good for more than merely shuffling files around these days. They can breathe new life into an ailing or old PC, house an operating system, or even double as full-blown SSDs.
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6 Modern SEO Concepts Copywriters Should Action | Emarketeers

6 Modern SEO Concepts Copywriters Should Action | Emarketeers | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
SEO copywriting has massively evolved, with old school techniques replaced by new. Learn 6 important SEO concepts that will impact your content planning and.
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Google Street View στην Ελλάδα! Ήδη είναι "live" στην χώρα - Sotostips

Google Street View στην Ελλάδα! Ήδη είναι "live" στην χώρα - Sotostips | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Μετά από σχεδόν 5 αδίκως χαμένα χρόνια η υπηρεσία Google Street View στην Ελλάδα με πανοραμικές 360° φωτογραφίες.
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6 Habits of Great Connectors

Entrepreneur Scott Dinsmore shares the traits that the best networkers he's met have in common.

Via Janice Krako
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Janice Krako's curator insight, June 2, 2014 5:33 PM

Do you have these habits?   #socialskills

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I warned him all that black hat SEO would lead to no good – cartoon - Marketing magazine Australia (blog)

I warned him all that black hat SEO would lead to no good – cartoon - Marketing magazine Australia (blog) | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Marketing magazine Australia (blog)
I warned him all that black hat SEO would lead to no good – cartoon
Marketing magazine Australia (blog)
I warned him all that black hat SEO would lead to no good – cartoon.
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What to Do When Social Media Is Not Working For Your Business | Social Media Examiner

What to Do When Social Media Is Not Working For Your Business | Social Media Examiner | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
What to do when social media is not working. Reevaluate your social media tactics with these tips to find and engage with your audience on social media.

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Laura Tate's curator insight, April 11, 2014 12:15 PM

Great tips in the post. It takes a great deal of analyzing your social media traffic reports to gain insight to what engages your fans more. People want to be entertained, given useful or interesting information, and even shocked!

Pawan Webworld's curator insight, April 12, 2014 8:34 AM

if that's happens so online business pulse rate is decreased & we'll get demorlised....our website earning rate is also decreased...

 

http://hotelthewoodz.com/

Rizz K's curator insight, April 12, 2014 5:26 PM

We need to constantly re-evaluate our social media marketing and fine tune our efforts with the audience. 

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10 Weirdest Things On Wikipedia - YouTube

10 Weirdest Facts About Wikipedia Homework hero Wikipedia knows no limits. With articles on everything from the 'Religion of Wikipedia' to the 'list of list ...

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"Budha Halo" looms after rainfalls at Mount Huangshan in Anhui - Xinhua | English.news.cn

"Budha Halo" looms after rainfalls at Mount Huangshan in Anhui - Xinhua | English.news.cn | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
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Συντριβή του SpaceShipTwo της Virgin Galactic με νεκρό πιλότο

Συντριβή του SpaceShipTwo της Virgin Galactic με νεκρό πιλότο | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Συνετρίβη το ιδιωτικό διαστημικό σκάφος SpaceShipTwo της Virgin Galactic και σκοτώθηκε ένας από τους πιλότους ενώ ο άλλος γλίτωσε με τραύματα
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Online Professionalism and the Mirror of Social Media

Online Professionalism and the Mirror of Social Media | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it

The rise of social media—content created by Internet users and hosted by popular sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Wikipedia, and blogs—has brought several new hazards for medical professionalism. First, many physicians may find applying principles for medical professionalism to the online environment challenging in certain contexts. Second, physicians may not consider the potential impact of their online content on their patients and the public. Third, a momentary lapse in judgment by an individual physician to create unprofessional content online can reflect poorly on the entire profession. To overcome these challenges, we encourage individual physicians to realize that as they “tread” through the World Wide Web, they leave behind a “footprint” that may have unintended negative consequences for them and for the profession at large. We also recommend that institutions take a proactive approach to engage users of social media in setting consensus-based standards for “online professionalism.” Finally, given that professionalism encompasses more than the avoidance of negative behaviors, we conclude with examples of more positive applications for this technology. Much like a mirror, social media can reflect the best and worst aspects of the content placed before it for all to see.

KEY WORDS: professionalism, internet use, medical ethics, health policyGo to:INTRODUCTION

The Internet has changed many interactions between professionals and the public. The recent development of Web 2.0 applications (also known as “social media”) has created particular hazards for public views of certain professions. School teachers1 and lawyers2 across the country have been sanctioned or fired for online indiscretions felt to violate societal expectations for how they represent their personal lives in the public sphere. Recently, similar incidents have also involved physicians. In one instance, physicians and other health professionals delivering aid in Haiti posted pictures online of naked and unconscious patients in operating suites, and of physicians drinking or posing with grins and “thumbs up” in front of patients or coffins.3 While it is tempting to view such incidents as rare events, recent research has shown that posting of unprofessional content is common among medical students, residents, and other health care providers.4–6 In many cases, users of social media may simply fail to consider issues of professionalism in their online actions and may, in fact, routinely display exemplary ethics and character in their offline actions. As a case in point, the professionals cited above exemplified principles of altruism and social justice through their volunteer work in Haiti and were ultimately exonerated by licensing authorities.7 Still, damage to public perceptions of the medical aid effort was already done. Rather than blaming the technology or vilifying the user, we believe this example underscores the need for improved education and communication about the use of social media by professionals.8,9

Go to:ONLINE ACTIVITY, MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM, AND THE PUBLIC

Although principles and commitments for medical professionalism already exist,10 we believe that many physicians may have difficulty applying these principals to their online actions for at least three reasons. First, some of the online content that has been identified as unprofessional in both the medical literature and mass media may not clearly violate existing principles of medical professionalism. For example, some physicians may not realize that images of off-duty drinking on a social networking site may raise questions from the public about unprofessional behavior, especially if intoxication is implied. A second and related concern is that many people experience a sense of disinhibition in their online actions. Social media in particular can create a perception of anonymity and detachment from social cues and consequences for online actions.11 Thus, medical professionals may say or do things they would not say or do in person, such as disclosure of confidential information (including pictures of patients), or display speech and behaviors that are disrespectful to colleagues or patients and their families. Third, the potential impact of such indiscretions is much greater than typical face-to-face interactions because of the wide reach of this media. While physicians must always be vigilant to avoid violating patient confidentiality, a slip made online can have far greater impact than one made over lunch with a colleague.

Regrettably, social media can enable content posted in a momentary lapse in judgment to spread rapidly beyond the intended audience with a simple “click.” In this sense, social media can act as a mirror reflecting intimate thoughts and behaviors back to oneself as well as to others around the world. For an increasingly Internet-savvy public, “images” reflected by this social media mirror may prove very important in sizing up not only the credentials, but also the character of professionals. Moreover, when amplified by press coverage, unprofessional images of professionals in the social media mirror may also be magnified or distorted as in the case of the physicians providing aid in Haiti.

While rigorous studies on patient perceptions of physicians’ social media use are lacking, recent media coverage of the topic12 and online reader responses, such as the following, are illuminating: “Medicine is a very serious profession…[but] teetering on the edge of respectability and trust in some areas. Soon there will be so little trust that it will undermine the respectable people who have chosen this profession.”13 Other readers posted similar comments, “Anybody who isn't smart enough to figure out what's OK to post on the Internet has absolutely no business being in charge of other people's health,” and “As professionals, doctors, teachers, lawyers, etc., are held to a certain standard. If that's not your cup of tea, find a different job.” These comments suggest that some may view a physician’s online activity as a proxy for the common sense and trustworthiness needed to handle the responsibilities of patient care. Moreover, when technology such as social media has the ability to alter ways in which physicians can interact with individual patients and the public at large, physicians must reconsider the implications of their professional commitments.14 While it may not be necessary to expand the existing framework for professionalism, physicians should at least consider the issues raised by social media and make informed decisions for themselves, or in collaboration with colleagues or superiors, to decide what is appropriate and inappropriate for their group, institution, or workplace as they represent themselves in a new web where user-generated content abounds.

Go to:SUGGESTIONS FOR INDIVIDUALS AND INSTITUTIONS

To illustrate the impact of an individual’s online actions, the Pew Internet and American Life Project has advanced the idea that each Internet user creates a “digital footprint.”15 This concept encourages individuals to think of downstream consequences for each online action they take and become aware that as they “tread” through the World Wide Web, they leave behind a “footprint.” This footprint is visible to others and may have unintended negative consequences, such as diminishing one’s chances to obtain a desired training position or job. But beyond the self-interested rationale for monitoring online activity to protect themselves, physicians also have a duty to consider the broader impact of their “digital footprint” and how their online actions reflect on the profession at large—much in the way that the concept of a “carbon footprint” invokes the greater cause of environmentalism. Thus, the concept of “think globally, act locally” applies to physician behavior online in the same way it applies to human behavior in relation to the environment; each individual physician should develop a greater consciousness of the potential impact of their online actions for the entire profession.

Beyond the role of individuals, institutions have an important role to play in defining and exemplifying what might be called “online professionalism.” As yet, there are no widely accepted guidelines to assist individuals and institutions in navigating challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism while online. Even medical schools, which oversee the youngest members of the profession and the most frequent users of social media, have not universally formed policies specifically addressing this issue.4 Accordingly, we suggest that institutions—from medical schools and residencies to hospitals and group practices—should take a proactive stance in setting guidelines and standards for their members. We propose that institutional standards for “online professionalism” utilize valuable concepts such as the digital footprint and emphasize the power of social media to reflect professional values to the public. We also believe that the best way to develop institutional concepts for online professionalism is to engage various users of these technologies in a consensus-oriented dialogue that involves students, patients, educators, clinicians, and administrators. Such dialogue, especially if it is sustained over time, also has the potential to reduce the number of problems arising from the use of social media by virtue of the shared educational impact of discussing the standards for online professionalism that are agreeable to all parties involved. Indeed, emerging research with medical students and residents suggests that most feel responsibility to represent themselves professionally online, and while they oppose strict regulation of their online behavior, increased dialogue and guidance is welcomed.16,17

Go to:THE POWER OF SOCIAL MEDIA TO PROMOTE MEDICAL PROFESSIONALISM

Problematic uses of social media by physicians have garnered a great deal of public attention to date. Yet an equally important challenge for medical professionals is to use the mirror of social media positively. For example, respectful clinical narratives written by medical students that avoid disclosing any personally identifiable information about patients can promote understanding, reflection, and greater appreciation of the patient-physician relationship.18,19 Students have also used social media to improve patient safety by promoting the World Health Organization’s Surgical Checklist.20 Practicing physicians can use social networking and other Web 2.0 tools to share sound medical information and help the public interpret medical studies, thereby becoming sources of credible medical information on the Internet. Some have even argued that maintaining an online presence that is accessible and useful to patients is a must for physicians.21 Indeed, a compelling case for quality improvement through better communication via social media can be made,22 and medical professionalism encompasses a commitment to quality improvement.10 An increasing number of public health organizations, hospitals, and medical centers are using social networking applications to provide medical information to the public.23 Collectively, these interactions can serve as a counter-balance to less trustworthy sources of information as the public increasingly turns to the Internet to find health information.

If social media is a mirror, what kind of reflections does the public see of physicians? While many Internet sites offer ratings of physicians,24 and it is believed that patients already search the Internet for information about their physicians frequently,25 we do not yet know the net impact of positive and negative online behaviors on the public’s overall view of physicians’ professional values. Certainly, the principle of “first, do no harm” should apply to physicians’ use of social media, but we can do better. Just as we must look beyond harm reduction towards health promotion in clinical practice, we must go farther than curtailing unprofessional behavior online and embrace the positive potential for social media: physicians and health care organizations can and should utilize the power of social media to facilitate interactions with patients and the public that increase their confidence in the medical profession. If we fail to engage this technology constructively, we will lose an important opportunity to expand the application of medical professionalism within contemporary society. Moreover, a proactive approach on the part of physicians may strengthen our patients’ understanding of medical professionalism and provide an example of “online professionalism” for other professions to consider.


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Δωρεάν το ακριβό LFS101x Introduction to Linux σε EdX MOOC από 1η Αυγούστου

Δωρεάν το ακριβό LFS101x Introduction to Linux σε EdX MOOC από 1η Αυγούστου | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Μεγάλη ευκαιρία προσφέρει το EdX σε συνεργασία με Linux Foundation για δωρεάν online εκπαίδευση στο Linux με το Introduction to Linux (LFS101) course.
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Lego "μικρογραφία" της Ακρόπολης δώρησαν στο Μουσείο Ακρόπολης

Lego "μικρογραφία" της Ακρόπολης δώρησαν στο Μουσείο Ακρόπολης | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Το Μουσείο της ακρόπολης δέχτηκε μια χρήσιμη αλλά και συμβολικής σημασίας δωρεά. Μια Ακρόπολη από τουβλάκια LEGO, δώρο από το Μουσείο Nicholson της Αυστραλίας.
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Social Media Campaign Takes Aim At Red Bull Following Teen's Death - TIME

Social Media Campaign Takes Aim At Red Bull Following Teen's Death - TIME | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Social Media Campaign Takes Aim At Red Bull Following Teen's Death
TIME
After Hamman's sudden death, her friends launched a social media campaign with the hashtag #GetLannaHome that served two purposes.
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Social Media Campaign Takes Aim At Red Bull Following Teen's Death - TIME

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What, When, And How To Share On Social Media

What, When, And How To Share On Social Media | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
When is the best time of day to share that hilarious video to your Facebook friends, or retweet an inspiring article for your followers? Every social...
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Which Social Media Accounts Really Matter and Why

Which Social Media Accounts Really Matter and Why | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Don't waste your time messing around on social sites that have no ROI for you. Here's how you can do better at gaining leads on the sites that are perfect for your business.
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5 Reasons You May Not Want to Work for Google

5 Reasons You May Not Want to Work for Google | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
Several times each week, I get contacted by job seekers who ask the following:"How can I get a job with Google?"I cringe each time I get that question. It's like asking, "How can I get a one-on-one
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The Worst SEO Advice: 17 SEO Experts Weigh In | Powered by Search

The Worst SEO Advice: 17 SEO Experts Weigh In | Powered by Search | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
17 experts discuss the worst SEO advice they have heard, and what exactly makes it so bad.
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Amid fake reviews, consumers skeptical of social media marketing - Digits - WSJ

Amid fake reviews, consumers skeptical of social media marketing - Digits - WSJ | Blogging, other Social Media & Internet | Scoop.it
A new survey about attitudes to online marketing techniques, such as fake Facebook ‘likes’, tweets about brands, and hiding negative reviews from search engine results, suggests that marketers are a lot more relaxed about such practices than the...
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