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Get Free Bitcoins with 54 Website Faucets that Really Pay [Update] - The Mac Observer

Get Free Bitcoins with 54 Website Faucets that Really Pay [Update] - The Mac Observer | block chain | Scoop.it
Update #19, November 16th, 2014 - Added several new high paying faucets while I work on reformatting the list. Added three new Dogecoin faucets, too. Also noted that two faucets have gone offline. - Bryan]

[Update #18, November 13th, 2014 - Added two new faucets; noted that Microwallet.org resumed payouts; removed BitChest faucets as that wallet hasn't paid in months; removed a couple of other faucets to the WARNING list, including Click2Dad. I'm also working on some format changes, some new Dogecoin faucets, and a new wallet service. - Bryan
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Artist Jenna Lash Shares Experience Connecting Bitcoin to Art

Artist Jenna Lash Shares Experience Connecting Bitcoin to Art | block chain | Scoop.it
Bitcoin and art; that’s an odd combination, isn’t it? For artist Jenna Lash and FlorinCoin developer Joeseph Fiscella, it’s a very beneficial combination. Together, on Thursday night, they presented an introduction to cryptocurrencies to members of the artistic community at the close of her art exhibition, titled “What is Gained and What is Lost” at the Bitcoin Center NYC. The presentation involved Lash asking common questions artists and people in general may have about cryptocurrencies to Fiscella; To a room of artists and cryptocurrency enthusiasts, they answered questions like ‘What is Bitcoin?’ and “How does it work?” to more specific questions like “What does Bitcoin offer artists?”
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MIT Undergrads Can Now Claim Their Free $100 in Bitcoin

MIT Undergrads Can Now Claim Their Free $100 in Bitcoin | block chain | Scoop.it
Half a million dollars-worth of bitcoin is being given away to undergraduates at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology as part of a scheme to encourage use and awareness of the digital currency.

From yesterday, each MIT undergrad became eligible to claim $100 in bitcoin (0.290272 BTC at press time) by completing a survey hosted by The MIT Bitcoin Project, the student organisation that is organising the giveaway.

However, students looking to obtain the free funds will have to hurry. The survey must be completed before the scheme ends on 2nd November.

The survey results will form part of a study conducted by the organisers to promote the university as a "global hub" for bitcoin research and business.

The MIT Bitcoin Project was announced in April after two MIT students, Jeremy Rubin and Dan Elitzer, raised $500,000 from university alumni and members of the bitcoin community.

The fund-raising objective was to distribute the funds in bitcoin to the more than 4,500 undergraduates enrolled at MIT to spur academic and entrepreneurial activity at the campus.

Spending the free coin

Students who receive the free bitcoin already have a couple of options if they want to spend them on campus. The university bookshop, for example, began accepting bitcoin last month. Textbooks, school supplies and an array of MIT-branded merchandise will be available for bitcoin purchasers.

Then there's Fireflies, an application being developed by MIT students that will allow users to crowdsource goods and services for bitcoin. It won the 'Awesome Award' and a prize of $1,500 at the summer-long MIT BitComp, a contest to encourage the development of bitcoin-focused apps.

The Fireflies team told CoinDesk last month that it would focus on making its services more easily available to MIT students, particularly to complement the planned bitcoin giveaway.

The MIT Bitcoin Club, where Elitzer is president, has also proved to be one of the most active chapters of the College Cryptocurrency Network, a fast-growing group of student organisations focused on digital currencies.

"As one of the longest-standing CCN chapters, we've been in the position of providing assistance to newer and prospective members," Elitzer said, adding:
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Gems Bitcoin App Lets Users Earn Money From Social Messaging

Gems Bitcoin App Lets Users Earn Money From Social Messaging | block chain | Scoop.it
A new social messaging app is aiming to disrupt the established social media business model through the power of crypto 2.0 technology. If big social media companies make money by monetizing data, the Gem project asks, shouldn't users also profit from the service?

Launching today at Inside Bitcoins Tel Aviv, Gems is seeking to uncover whether consumers can be compelled to change the way they view their relationship with social media, and in the process, embrace cryptocurrency.

Though lofty in its ideals, lead developer Daniel Peled told CoinDesk that users should find the Gems social messaging service familiar. Peled compared Gems to Whatsapp, with one addition, the user's username is also an alias for their bitcoin address, an innovation that allows Gems users to send both bitcoin and gems, an in-app token that will effectively decentralize ownership of the network itself.

Unlike with Whatsapp, users are incentivized to grow the network, receiving gems for certain actions. Gems can then be exchanged for bitcoin and ultimately sold for fiat dollars, Peled explained, meaning users are essentially paid for spreading the network:

"Everything we do on Facebook or Whatsapp, [the companies are] making money out of it. They're using our information, they're selling it to advertisers and we don't see anything out of it. We think that the users should be rewarded much more for using the application. So anything that we can do to incentive people, we do it with Gems."

Gems will soon be available for both iPhone and Android users.
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Digital Badges Need Mass to Matter (EdSurge News)

Digital Badges Need Mass to Matter (EdSurge News) | block chain | Scoop.it
Parts of the edtech world are abuzz about “open” digital badges.

But despite the excitement about, and real potential of, these intelligent graphics in education they will need more than current passion or even eventual ubiquity to succeed. They will need to mean something to more than just those
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Bitcoin's Killer Apps - CoinDesk

Bitcoin's Killer Apps - CoinDesk | block chain | Scoop.it
Most people think about bitcoin as an alternative to something they already know, as opposed to an enabler of something they never considered.

In 1985, Steve Jobs was asked by a journalist for concrete reasons why anyone would buy a computer for the home. He answered that “so far, that’s more of a conceptual market than a real market”.

He went on to say that if you aren’t buying a PC to help you do business work at home, then you probably want one because “you know there’s something going on, you don’t exactly know what it is, so you want to learn”.

But, he added, “this will change: computers will be essential in most homes”.

When the journalist pressed him to explain why, he predicted the Internet:

“The most compelling reason for most people to buy a computer for the home will be to link it into a nationwide communications network. We’re just in the beginning stages of what will be a truly remarkable breakthrough for most people – as remarkable as the telephone.”
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Michael Goldstein Explains How The Bitcoin Block Chain Enables Smart Property | Newfination

Michael Goldstein Explains How The Bitcoin Block Chain Enables Smart Property | Newfination | block chain | Scoop.it
In this interview Michael explains another functionality that can be integrated to Bitcoin transactions: Smart Property.

Via unspy
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As Technology Gets Better, Will Society Get Worse | Tim Wu Blog | The New Yorker

As Technology Gets Better, Will Society Get Worse | Tim Wu Blog | The New Yorker | block chain | Scoop.it

Imagine that two people are carving a six-foot slab of wood at the same time. One is using a hand-chisel, the other, a chainsaw. If you are interested in the future of that slab, whom would you watch?

 

This chainsaw/chisel logic has led some to suggest that technological evolution is more important to humanity’s near future than biological evolution; nowadays, it is not the biological chisel but the technological chainsaw that is most quickly redefining what it means to be human. The devices we use change the way we live much faster than any contest among genes. We’re the block of wood, even if, as I wrote in January, sometimes we don’t even fully notice that we’re changing.

 

Assuming that we really are evolving as we wear or inhabit more technological prosthetics—like ever-smarter phones, helpful glasses, and brainy cars—here’s the big question: Will that type of evolution take us in desirable directions, as we usually assume biological evolution does?

 

Some, like the Wired founder Kevin Kelly, believe that the answer is a resounding “yes.” In his book “What Technology Wants,” Kelly writes: “Technology wants what life wants: Increasing efficiency; Increasing opportunity; Increasing emergence; Increasing complexity; Increasing diversity; Increasing specialization; Increasing ubiquity; Increasing freedom; Increasing mutualism; Increasing beauty; Increasing sentience; Increasing structure; Increasing evolvability.”

 

We can test the “Increasing” theory by taking a quick trip up north, to an isolated area south of the Hudson Bay. Here live the Oji-Cree, a people, numbering about thirty thousand, who inhabit a cold and desolate land roughly the size of Germany. For much of the twentieth century, the Oji-Cree lived at a technological level that can be described as relatively simple. As nomads, they lived in tents during the summer, and in cabins during the winter. Snowshoes, dog sleds, and canoes were the main modes of transportation, used to track and kill fish, rabbits, and moose for food.

 

A doctor who worked with the Oji-Cree in the nineteen-forties has noted the absence of mental breakdowns or substance abuse within the population, observing that “the people lived a rugged, rigorous life with plenty of exercise.” The Oji-Cree invariably impressed foreigners with their vigor and strength. Another visitor, in the nineteen-fifties, wrote of their “ingenuity, courage, and self-sacrifice,” noting that, in the North, “only those prepared to face hardship and make sacrifices could survive.”

 

The Oji-Cree have been in contact with European settlers for centuries, but it was only in the nineteen-sixties, when trucks began making the trip north, that newer technologies like the internal combustion engine and electricity really began to reach the area. The Oji-Cree eagerly embraced these new tools. In our lingo, we might say that they went through a rapid evolution, advancing through hundreds of years of technology in just a few decades.

 

The good news is that, nowadays, the Oji-Cree no longer face the threat of winter starvation, which regularly killed people in earlier times. They can more easily import and store the food they need, and they enjoy pleasures like sweets and alcohol. Life has become more comfortable. The constant labor of canoeing or snowshoeing has been eliminated by outboard engines and snowmobiles. Television made it north in the nineteen-eighties, and it has proved enormously popular.

 

But, in the main, the Oji-Cree’s story is not a happy one.

 

Click headline to read more--

 


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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IBM Sees Role for Block Chain in Internet of Things

IBM Sees Role for Block Chain in Internet of Things | block chain | Scoop.it
IBM researchers are looking into the possibility of using block chain technology for the Internet of Things (IoT) – a term for the growing network of devices with basic computer-like capabilities that communicate over the web.

The IoT is likely to bring a major change in the way we use technology, with interaction between connected everyday devices (such as pacemakers, fire alarms or air-conditioning units) and humans increasingly becoming the norm.

Now IBM is examining the use of block chain technology for an IoT distribution platform, backed by other peer-to-peer (P2P) technologies.

The system, dubbed ‘Adept’, will rely on three different technologies to resolve a number of issues related to IoT development and commercialisation.
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Gamification At Work: What Employees Really Think - eLearning Industry

Gamification At Work: What Employees Really Think  - eLearning Industry | block chain | Scoop.it
Gamification At Work: What Employees Really Think About Gamification At Work.
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Higher Education in 2024: Glimpsing the Future (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu

Higher Education in 2024: Glimpsing the Future (EDUCAUSE Review) | EDUCAUSE.edu | block chain | Scoop.it
The higher education IT community has long sought to anticipate the future. The digital world has developed so rapidly, especially since the advent of the web, that planning for today's devices risks missing major opportunities down the road. Campuses can be blindsided by the emergence of new continents on the computational map.

Campus leaders have relied on several futures approaches, including extrapolating from current trends and data, observing students' use of technology, collaborating with peers, and relying on inter-institutional organizations for research. Scenarios, or stories of projected futures, have also proven useful—and are the subject of this article.

Scenarios allow campus planners to imagine themselves in a future environment, based on their narrative and discursive structure. Unlike, say, reports or tables of data, scenarios are stories, meaning that they will have a far greater likelihood of emotional connection. Understanding a scenario engages a reader's creativity, either in formal role-playing or in the imaginative act of envisioning one's campus under different conditions. Scenarios also elicit conversation within a group as different people offer their interpretations of new developments and their potential responses. As such, scenarios are fine pedagogical objects, well suited for use by those involved in educational institutions.

I offer here three scenarios for U.S. higher education in the year 2024. The date is chosen for the psychological appeal of a ten-year interval. It also lets us get beyond the four- or five-year horizon typically used in campus planning and allows enough time for the emergence of major cultural developments.
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IBM Sees Role for Block Chain in Internet of Things

IBM Sees Role for Block Chain in Internet of Things | block chain | Scoop.it
IBM researchers are looking into the possibility of using block chain technology to underpin the Internet of Things.
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Will Web 3.0 Bring the End of the Web Browser?

Will Web 3.0 Bring the End of the Web Browser? | block chain | Scoop.it
This article describes what Web 3.0 might mean to the web browser. Web 3.0 may bring artificial intelligence to web searching, and social interaction to the next level, but Web 3.0 may also bring about a complete re-structuring of web browsers.
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Computers Are Writing Novels, But Do You Really Want To Read Them?

Computers Are Writing Novels, But Do You Really Want To Read Them? | block chain | Scoop.it
It’s 10pm, November 30th, 2013. An author, aiming to finish a novel in November, takes up his laptop and begins typing furiously. By midnight, he’s completed I Got a Alligator for a Pet. A world record? No, just a clever bit of code.

I Got a Alligator for a Pet, written by a developer’s computer program, was part of National Novel Generation Month (NaNoGenMo), a competition in which programmers write apps that automatically generate at least 50,000 words.

Emulating National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo)—a November tradition where authors attempt to complete an entire novel (start to finish) in a month—developer and internet artist Darius Kazemi started NaNoGenMo last year.

Like NaNoWriMo, NaNoGenMo offers no prizes. Unlike NaNoWriMo, the computer-generated novels need not make one whit of sense (though many do). There are few rules beyond submission of the book and the code responsible for writing it.

Many of last year’s submissions used source content by humans—dream journals, tweets, fan fiction, Jane Austen, Homer. One is 50,000 words of roommates arguing about cleaning the apartment. Another has the simplistic feel of a reading primer. While the results aren’t exactly Shakespeare or Hemingway, they are, with few exceptions comical.

Kazemi’s contribution, Teens Wander Around a House, begins, “Philomena, Dita, Vivianna, Darby, Kiah, and Gale found themselves dropped off at the same party at the same time by the irrespective mothers. How awkward.”
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David Orban Explains the Bitcoin Singularity - CryptoCoinsNews

David Orban Explains the Bitcoin Singularity - CryptoCoinsNews | block chain | Scoop.it
David Orban is an entrepreneur and a visionary global high technology analyst. He is CEO of the US-based technology platform and services company Dotsub, which powers captions and translations as subtitles in any language in online videos to remove barriers to multi-cultural communications. Orban was a co-founder of WideTag, a technology company providing the infrastructure …
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How Block Chain Technology Could Usher in Digital Democracy

How Block Chain Technology Could Usher in Digital Democracy | block chain | Scoop.it
In the digital age, it seems strange that people all around the world still use paper to vote. Of course, given bitcoin's promise to remove paper from the financial system, many in the industry are beginning to ask if the same block chain technology can be applied to help modernize the democratic process.

There's good reason, as the traditional paper voting system has its flaws. In 2012, when the last US election occurred, one in every eight voter registrations was invalid or inaccurate, and 2.7 million voters were registered in multiple states. That’s a terrible statistic in a system used to decide the future of any nation, let alone one as powerful as the US.

Some might argue that the paper voting system could use a little digital efficiency. Internet voting might not only be more accurate, but it could also be more frequent. Organising a paper-based vote on monthly issues would be impractical, but voting from your tablet or mobile phone on, say, whether to allow your local MP or senator to continue in their role might encourage a little more accountability in the seat of power.

Forget it, says Barbara Simons. "At this point we cannot do Internet voting securely," warns the former IBM computer scientist who has conducted extensive research into Internet voting. Readers will point out that Internet voting is already happening, but she's saying that we cannot guarantee its integrity.
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How Bitcoin Could Save Journalism and the Arts

How Bitcoin Could Save Journalism and the Arts | block chain | Scoop.it
Walter Isaacson is the author of The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution, out this week.

Micropayment systems have the potential to reward creativity and exceptional content—on a realistic scale

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The rise of Bitcoin, the digital cryptocurrency, has resurrected the hope of facilitating easy micropayments for content online. “Using Bitcoin micropayments to allow for payment of a penny or a few cents to read articles on websites enables reasonable compensation of authors without depending totally on the advertising model,” writes Sandy Ressler in Bitcoin Magazine.

This could lead to a whole new era of creativity, just like the economy that was launched 400 years ago by the Statute of Anne, which gave people who wrote books, plays or songs the right to make a royalty when they were copied. An easy micropayment system would permit today’s content creators, from major media companies to basement bloggers, to be able to sell digital copies of their articles, songs, games, and art by the piece. In addition to allowing them to pay the rent, it would have the worthy benefit of encouraging people to produce content valued by users rather than merely seek to aggregate eyeballs for advertisers.
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What Is Web 3.0 And How Will It Change Education? | Edudemic

What Is Web 3.0 And How Will It Change Education? | Edudemic | block chain | Scoop.it
We'll reach a new state of web skills when we reinvent technology tools to better enhance our personal learning. We'll be at 3.0 when schools are everywhere and not viewed as daycare.
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aml_think's curator insight, December 8, 2014 6:53 AM

interesting and scaring and motivating as well!

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Interview with DApps Fund Managing Partner Sam Yilmaz - CryptoCoinsNews

Interview with DApps Fund Managing Partner Sam Yilmaz - CryptoCoinsNews | block chain | Scoop.it
The Bitcoin 2.0 scene is often talked about as being the next necessary step in the evolution of an autonomous society. It’s the world of decentralized applications that run on top of Bitcoin‘s underlying technology, the block chain. Some even say the block chain itself is the most important technology to come out of Bitcoin. Also …

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Bitcoin: How its core technology will change the world - tech - 05 February 2014 - New Scientist

Bitcoin: How its core technology will change the world - tech - 05 February 2014 - New Scientist | block chain | Scoop.it
The virtual currency is about more than money – the real innovation is what people are doing with the technology it is based on

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BITCOIN has been called many things, from the future of money to a drug dealer's dream and everything else in between. But beyond creating the web's first native currency, the true innovation of Bitcoin's mysterious designer, Satoshi Nakamoto, is its underlying technology, the "block chain". That fundamental concept is being used to transform Bitcoin – and could even replace it altogether.

So what is the block chain? It is a ledger of transactions that keeps Bitcoin secure and allows all users to agree on exactly who owns how many bitcoins. Each new block requires a record of recent transactions along with a string of letters and numbers, known as a hash, which is based on the previous block and produced using a cryptographic algorithm.

Miners, people who run the peer-to-peer Bitcoin software, randomly generate hashes, competing to produce one with a value below a certain target difficulty and thus complete a new block and receive a reward, currently 25 bitcoins. This difficulty means faking a transaction is impossible unless you have more computing power than everyone else on the Bitcoin network combined. Confused? Don't worry, ordinary Bitcoin users needn't know the details of how the block chain works, just as people with a credit card don't bother learning banking network jargon. But those who do understand the power of the block chain are realising how Nakamoto's technology for mass agreement can be adapted. "You can replace that agreement with all sorts of different things and now you have a really powerful building block for any kind of distributed system," says Jeremy Clark of Concordia University in Montreal, Canada.


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The Future of Work – A journey to 2022

Tremendous forces are radically reshaping the world of work as we know it. Disruptive innovations are creating new industries and business models and destroying old ones. New technologies, data analytics and social networks are having a huge impact on how we communicate, collaborate and work. Many of the roles and job titles of tomorrow will be ones we’ve not even thought of yet.

 

This report takes you on a journey to 2022 and explores how the changing business landscape will impact your people management strategy.

 

What path will you take?


Via Alex Watson, Kenneth Mikkelsen
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Why Travel Could be Bitcoin's Killer App

Why Travel Could be Bitcoin's Killer App | block chain | Scoop.it
Traveling to various countries often can mean making complex currency conversions. Can bitcoin fix this problem?
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Higher Education: A Dinosaur in the Digital Age « iMediaConnection Blog

Higher Education: A Dinosaur in the Digital Age « iMediaConnection Blog | block chain | Scoop.it
What does a four-year college education get you today? Besides a large sum of debt, not much, especially if you’ve invested in a communications or marketing degree. The higher-education system is ill-preparing its students for our digital world.

Less Philosophy, More Skills
What is the number one KPI of a higher-education institution? Well, it should be, how well it sets up its students for future success. When colleges are not delivering a well-rounded education for the world of today and tomorrow, they are failing. Plain and simple. This is all too often the case for recent graduates looking for their first career opportunity.
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Let's discuss IBM's new block chain internet of things architecture and robots

Let's discuss IBM's new block chain internet of things architecture and robots | block chain | Scoop.it
Everyone has an idea of how we need to build out the infrastructure for the internet of things, and big companies like IBM may have several. This week we learn about using block chain for IoT.
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Bitcoin Could Transform Internet of Things into Vast Data Marketplace

Bitcoin Could Transform Internet of Things into Vast Data Marketplace | block chain | Scoop.it
Researchers anticipate a future where sensors transmit money alongside data, as they are paid in bitcoin for their information.
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