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Social learning in action at #elnil

Social learning in action at #elnil | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it

Via Minter Dial
David Bramley's insight:

Informal learning can form an essential role in blended learning, but only if learners understand what informal learning is and how to participate...learning how to learn!  This post provides a great example of how facilitated nformal learning using technology (Twitter) can add a new dimension to the learning experience...people from outside the classrom participating s well as those within it!

 

Next time you are running a face to face session, why not ask learners to turn mobiles to silent, rather than turn them off?

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Minter Dial's curator insight, November 27, 2013 6:07 AM

Back channel and informal learning

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blended-learning-report-202013.pdf

David Bramley's insight:

Blended learning has grown out of the need to reduce the number of days workers spend away from the workplace.  Providers have devised a myriad of ways to deliver the 'blend', some of which are more effective than others.  This is a concise report that looks at current practice and identifies good pactice.  If you are looking to develop a blended learning programme this is a great place to start.  A further report from the same authors, identifies 10 steps to improve your blended offer (see below).  Highly recommended 

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5 Common Problems Of Organizational Blended Learning And How To Overcome Them - eLearning Industry

5 Common Problems Of Organizational Blended Learning And How To Overcome Them - eLearning Industry | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
What are the challenges of organizational Blended Learning? Check 5 common problems of organizational Blended Learning and how to overcome them.
David Bramley's insight:

As employers have become more and more reluctant to allow staff time away from the workplace to develop professionally, blended learning strategies have been forced on training providers.  This means that all of those involved (providers, learners and employers)are learning how to make the most of this approach

 

I like this article as it recognises that learners have to adapt to blended learning as well as those designing and delivering the new strategy.  Well worth a read if you are looking to improve the quality of your 'blend'

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What’s the Difference Between a Flipped Classroom and Flipped Learning?

What’s the Difference Between a Flipped Classroom and Flipped Learning? | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
Contrary to popular belief, these concepts are not synonymous.
David Bramley's insight:

Much of the talk about 'flipping' focuses on what the teacher does, rather than what the learners do.  This is an interesting post that looks at the difference between flipping the classroom and flipping learning.  It also identifies the Four Pillars of F-L-I-P:

- Flexible Environment

- Learning Culture

- Intentional Content

- Professional Educator

 

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How to Build and Moderate a thriving Social Learning Community: Part 1 - Forming

How to Build and Moderate a thriving Social Learning Community: Part 1 - Forming | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
Social Learning happens within and alongside our communities: semi formal spaces where 'sense making' activities take place. Agile organisations create the right permissions and environments for th...
David Bramley's insight:

The goal of any blended learning design is to create learning opportunities outside of the face to face element of the programme.  Definitions of 'blended learning' assume the 'blend' will be online with a thriving online learning community the ultimate aspiration.  However, those of you that have experimented with forum or wiki will be aware that creating student engagement is problematic

 

This is the first in a series of thought provoking posts that identifies the key elements that lead to the creation of a thriving community and the role of a moderator.  Julian identifies timeliness and relevance as key factors for engagement and provides an example that relates to taking information out of forum long after it had been entered.  This made me think that rather than creating a blank online space for each new group of students, it would be more effective to pre-populate discussions with quality contributions from previous courses.   What o you think?

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5 types of online learners could make or break your institution - eCampus News

5 types of online learners could make or break your institution - eCampus News | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
A new report reveals it’s only those higher-ed universities that can market to, and satisfy, five groups of online learners that will thrive in the future.
David Bramley's insight:

Two quotes that should inspire you to read this post:

"(the report) found that of the 2,500 students it surveyed, 50 percent think that blended courses deliver better outcomes in education than traditional instruction does,"

 

“Students desire a much greater level of interactivity than current learning environments often provide,” explains the report. “Institutions that fail to prepare for these shifts and respond to the dramatically increased competition among online offerings risk losing relevance and overall market share.”

 

So you need to add an online element to your blended learning programme, but, students are more discerning and will judge the quality of your online offering.  This post provides you with an opportunity to find out more about what your students are looking for

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Podcasting: Do-it-yourself professional learning

Podcasting: Do-it-yourself professional learning | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
Educators have become some of the world’s most active content consumers. But why aren’t more educators creating their own digital content?
David Bramley's insight:

I'm a big fan of the following quotation:

"We always know more than we can say, and we will always say more than we can write down. "  Dave Snowden Founder & Chief Scientific Officer - Cognitive Edge  Hence the growth of YouTube!

 

My experience has been that most people (including myself) shy away from the thought of staring in their own video, which leaves podcasts as a viable alternative.  This post provides a great introduction and advice on how to get started.  Why not add podcasting to the elements of your blended learning programme?

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Learn Twitter - Joe Mazza

Learn Twitter - Joe Mazza | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
Free Twitter 101 eCourse for Parents & Educators Now matter where I am, every time I speak I hear people say, “I wish someone would teach me how to tweet.” Well, I’m hoping this resource will provide some of those folks a place to learn how to leverage this social media tool at their own …
David Bramley's insight:

Twitter has been voted the number one tool for learning for the last 5 years: http://c4lpt.co.uk/top100tools/ ; However, many are unaware of Twitter's capacity to drive learning and do not have an account

 

If you want to develop your Twitter skills, with a view to including social media in your blended learning programme, this is a good place to start.   Why not check out some of the other tools on the list?

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Edmodo: Why 31 Million Users Love It | Global Education Database

Edmodo: Why 31 Million Users Love It | Global Education Database | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it

Edmodo is basically like Facebook for your classroom - only it's not Facebook. You won't find students veering off course and just scrolling through their personal news feeds and photo galleries. Instead they can actually talk about projects, learning objectives, and just make learning a bit more engaging. All for free, so, win!

David Bramley's insight:

I haven't used Edmondo myself, but I can see it's potential.  If you have a blended delivery model and are looking for an online tool I recommend you check this out.  It's all about finding parts of the blended jigsaw that add value for learners

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'MOOCs have burst out of higher education into vocational learning. VOOCs have arrived.' - Education - TES News

The data shows that the vast majority of the millions of MOOCers are not undergraduate-age students, but older, life-long learners; people who work in corporates, government and other sectors. They are largely professionals who are learning for the sake of learning or up-skilling.

 
David Bramley's insight:

A really interesting perspective on M/VOOCs and how they can form part of a blended learning Offer.  I especially like the concept of learners dropping in rather than dropping out.  Mature learners personalising their learning by deciding what they want to learn, rather than following a pre-determined program.  Sounds like an interesting future for professional development

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Learning through Webinars: An e-learning perspective | Learn to Suceed - Bits and Bytes of e-learning by G-Cube

Learning through Webinars: An e-learning perspective | Learn to Suceed - Bits and Bytes of e-learning by G-Cube | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
Webinars are a powerful medium of learning delivery across varied learner groups – small or large. Easy to access as well as convenient, webinars are an effective mode of learning for professionals who can fit in the short bursts of learning into their schedules.
David Bramley's insight:

Webinars are a really effective form of e-learning to add to a blended course.  They provide a synchronous opportunity for those who can attend the live event and an asynchronous opportunity to watch the recording.  However, they will only add value if they are used well and this post provides lots of advice on how to develop and present a great webinar.  Why not check it out?

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9 Tips for Creating a Sense of Community for Distance Learners -- THE Journal

9 Tips for Creating a Sense of Community for Distance Learners -- THE Journal | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
With ever-increasing opportunities for online learning, educators must find new ways to engage their students and create a sense of community in a virtual world.
David Bramley's insight:

My experience has been that blended learning programs rarely include anything online.  Where they do, it's either a document dump with a forum or CBT style self paced learning.  To move to the next level, providers need to create a sense of community and facilitate collaboration.  This post is a great place to start creating a sense of community

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Talking about blended learning - part 4 - selecting media - YouTube

In this extended interview, Clive Shepherd addresses a wide range of key questions about blended learning, the answers to which will be of interest to just a...
David Bramley's insight:

Not quite what I expected!  This video discusss all available options including face-to-face and offline, with the final consideration being online.  My context is the delivery of qualifications and a reduction in  f2f interactions are a fact of life.  With this in mind, it's essential to consider how best to make use of this time

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Talking about blended learning - part 2 - analysing the situation - YouTube

In this extended interview, Clive Shepherd addresses a wide range of key questions about blended learning, the answers to which will be of interest to just a...
David Bramley's insight:

There is a temptation to develop a blended learning model and use it in all circumstances.  In this video Clive talks about the issues you may want to consider before you decide on the blend.  This is even more important when you are delivering a program of learning or a qualification...you can't presume that one blend will work for the whole program 

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Blended Learning at MIT


Via Fiona Harvey
David Bramley's insight:

This post is from 2012, but I guess MIT would want to claim they were ahead of the game!

 

I like it because it looks at a definition of blended learning and poses design questions.  But I particularly like the, 'Pre-course - Course - Post-course model it suggests, with the Course element having face-to-face interaction.  Looking at blended design in this way can help answer the question:  What is the best use of the face-to-face time I have available?

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Richard Whiteside's curator insight, July 3, 8:37 AM

A useful and interesting summary of some of the important points to consider when developing a blended course.

Steven E Teator's curator insight, July 19, 10:05 AM

This research paper provides a more detailed account of Blended Learning.  It discusses real world examples that can easy be applied to the Flipped Classroom.

Karen Olges's curator insight, July 27, 9:52 AM

MIT sponsored Scratch and my students just thrive with that to learn the basics of computer science. Very important!

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Beyond Self-Teaching Online: Using the Threaded Discussion in Distance Education by Clarence J. Bouchat : Learning Solutions Magazine

Beyond Self-Teaching Online: Using the Threaded Discussion in Distance Education  by Clarence   J. Bouchat : Learning Solutions Magazine | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it

Although there are many documented advantages of learning online, some educators still question this innovative way of teaching because of technical obstacles, because they suspect or doubt its effectiveness, or because they are unfamiliar with the approach. Indeed, the teaching considerations for an online course, versus a traditional in-residence-based course, do change by necessity because of the different learning environments.

 

Making traditional course material digital, converting lectures to streaming video, and assigning tests or writing assignments online are not enough to convert the full classroom experience into avirtual one.

 

What is lacking in the virtual setting is the dynamic interchange among students and instructors. Although their concerns are valid, in-residence educators should find solace in learning that one of the most fundamental forms of teaching, the student-peer discussion facilitated by a knowledgeable instructor, remains as valid for mature-student distance learning today as it was for Socrates. This venerable method remains effective for online students for the same reasons it works in the classroom — because the discourse among students actually builds knowledge and keeps learning focused on their needs. Online, this Socratic method of teaching, also known as a “threaded discussion” or a “forum,” is an excellent distancelearning tool. All online instructors should consider using this method.


Via Dennis T OConnor
David Bramley's insight:

The go-to activity for most teachers looking to add an activity to their online offering is the forum.  But  the activity is often ill thought through, the teacher doesn't participate themselves and as a result the forum fails to launch!

 

This post looks at threaded discussions and how teachers can use them to facilitate peer to peer discussion that will add value to the learning experience.  Highly recommended

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Bibhya Sharma's curator insight, October 6, 2014 9:36 PM

I agree that threaded discussions bring in the online interactions and exchange of knowledge. The danger is when such threads are not directed by the mentors or facilitators, the discussions can easily wander off to personal and sometime unnecessary issues.

online4ed's curator insight, October 7, 2014 9:37 AM

Why I work so hard to help students realize the more they put in to the class, the more they will get out! 

Deborah Eastwood's curator insight, October 12, 2014 1:15 PM

Understanding the importance of the discussion board in the online classroom. 

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The Online Education Bubble | aconventional

The Online Education Bubble | aconventional | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it

So why is there any interest at all in online education? It’s because education isn’t about learning – it’s about the certificate trade: you pay for certificates, and you can trade these for better-paid jobs. Simple. Only this market is breaking down: the first way it is breaking down is that there are now better ways to prove your worth...we can see their capability – in the same way we can judge restaurants – by looking at the ratings, comments and timeline

David Bramley's insight:

This is a challenging piece for me, as I work in Education and see the demand for 'certificates' growing.  However, I empathise  with the argument that creating courses that are based on content and assessed using theoretical tasks is not sustainable.

 

There's a great passage that looks at the value of CV's and the growing importance of your digital profile and portfolio's of work and I think this has potential for those developing blended learning programmes.  Instead of focusing on content, why not create a 'blend' that includes authentic, work-related tasks that can be evidenced in electronic portfolios.  Much more valuable for learners to take away than even the most impressive certificate :)

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Certificates, badges, and portfolios: international education and micro-credentialing | The UT Global Initiative for Education and Leadership

Certificates, badges, and portfolios: international education and micro-credentialing | The UT Global Initiative for Education and Leadership | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
David Bramley's insight:

My context is using blended learning to deliver qualifications.  The qualifications are awarded on the basis that learners achieve units of assessment.  But I know that the programmes providers develop to meet the needs of learners often go beyond the bounds of this assessment..  Miro-credentialing, such as badges, allows centres to reward learners and provide an incentive for them to complete the additional work

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The 5-step visual guide to using technology in education - Daily Genius

The 5-step visual guide to using technology in education - Daily Genius | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
Figuring out the best way to use technology in education leaves us all with plenty of questions. This guide gets you started on answering them.
David Bramley's insight:

Any definition of blended learning will include reference to an online presence, but with so many tools where do you start?  Well you could start here: http://c4lpt.co.uk/top100tools/, but that only narrows it down to 100!

 

I guess the best way is to just experiment.  This post provides encouragement and guidance such as embrace change, take a chance and become an early adopter.  It also suggests that we focus on how far we have traveled by recognising that we already use technology for learning

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The New Attention Span

The New Attention Span | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it

...could the attention span be, as Heffernan suggests, a phantom idea? In an age when we can have whatever information we want whenever we want it, might a healthy attention span be one that is more flexible, more elastic, one that gives us the ability, through repetition and a priori experiences, to quickly filter out that which should never be allowed to constitute any part of our modern-day souls?

David Bramley's insight:

A really interesting post that looks at the concept of 'attention span', considers what constitutes a healthy attention span and looks at what this means for learning.  For example, video with interactive layers, where learners can click on screen to access other internet destinations (http://bit.ly/1lMaDTM) and LMSs that are becoming social and collaborative. (https://www.edmodo.com/) 

 

Attention spans that are flexible, adaptable and elastic seem a perfect fit for blended learning

 

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Donald Clark Plan B: Anders Ericsson: practice, practice, practice

Donald Clark Plan B: Anders Ericsson: practice, practice, practice | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it

Anders Ericsson is a Swedish psychologist and expert on memory, expertise and the role of ‘deliberate’ practice. He is regarded as the father of a model of expertise in which experts are shaped, not by talent but the amount and type of practice, typically 10,000 hours, they employ in becoming experts.

David Bramley's insight:

An interesting take on using deliberate practice to develop expertise, with references for further reading.  The post includes guidelines on how to make practice effective e'g' chunk skills, act on feedback and repeat the practice whilst pushing oneself beyond what has been achieved

 

Have you considered how you could use practice as an element of your blended learning program? 

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A New Pedagogy is Emerging... and Online Learning is a Key Contributing Factor | Contact North

In all the discussion about learning management systems, open educational resources (OERs), massive open online courses (MOOCs), and the benefits and challenges of online learning, perhaps the most important issues concern how technology is changing the way we teach and - more importantly - the way students learn. For want of a better term, we call this “pedagogy.”

David Bramley's insight:

Like many others, when e-learning started to become popular, I expected the result to be totally online learning solutions.  However, as we now know online learning has become a supplement to classroom based teaching, although a new pedagogy is starting to appear.  A generic term for this is blended learning

 

This post provides a great overview of key trends and best of all ends with a number of case studies mainly taken from Canadian institutions. 

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Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future

Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
Why Learning Through Social Networks Is The Future
David Bramley's insight:

Most learners are accomplished social media users in their personal lives, but they may not use these skills as part of their professional development.  Encouraging learners to form an online network as part of your blended approach can help them develop a range of 21st Century Skills.  This article provides a great introduction to these skills and how they contribute to developing a personal learning network

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The Growing Popularity of Asynchronous Learning: A corporate learning perspective | Learn to Suceed - Bits and Bytes of e-learning by G-Cube

The Growing Popularity of Asynchronous Learning: A corporate learning perspective | Learn to Suceed - Bits and Bytes of e-learning by G-Cube | Blended Learning for Professional Development | Scoop.it
Reasons for popularity of asynchronous learning in corporate learning across vast geographies
David Bramley's insight:

Asynchronous means "not at the same time", which provides another dimension to blended learning programs.  Individuals can work together, but it doesn't have to be at the same time!  This is an insightful post that floats the idea of assessing asynchronous learning and using tools such as Twitter.  Why not create asynchronous activities that are open to everyone?  You could get experienced professionals contributing to the conversation 

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Talking about blended learning - part 5 - in conclusion - YouTube

David Bramley's insight:

If your not sure the other videos in the series will be worth your time, start with the conclusion.

 

Face-to-face time is expensive, but blended learning isn't about creating a cheap product that is low on quality.  The starting point is to create an effective learning program, designing the blend to deliver this as efficiently as possible. 

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Talking about blended learning - part 3 - selecting methods - YouTube

In this extended interview, Clive Shepherd addresses a wide range of key questions about blended learning, the answers to which will be of interest to just a...
David Bramley's insight:

You have your blended learning foundations and analysed the situation, now it's time to select the elements you will incorporate into your program.  Here Clive talks through the pro's and con's of various options both on and off-line

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Talking about blended learning - part 1 - foundations - YouTube

In this extended interview, Clive Shepherd addresses a wide range of key questions about blended learning, the answers to which will be of interest to just a...
David Bramley's insight:

The first of five videos where Clive talks about blended learning in an interview context in a Q&A style.  For example, Clive is asked for his definition of blended learning, one element of his reply is that it could be a blend of levels of participation e.g. personal learning, one to one (coaching, mentoring) or group learning.  This is a perspective I hadn't previously considered.  Insightful 

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