blended learning
Follow
Find tag "learning"
9.2K views | +2 today
blended learning
Retours d'expériences en blended
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by michel verstrepen from Eclectic Technology
Scoop.it!

10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning)

10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning) | blended learning | Scoop.it

"Even more than other types of education, eLearning must struggle to attract learners' attention: the Internet is full of distractions, and adult learners are both busier and more free to indulge in distractions. Helping students to pay attention is a primary concern of training professionalsso here are some optimal methods to win the attention game in eLearning."


Via Beth Dichter
more...
Bernard VULLIERME's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:30 AM

Rien de nouveau sous le soleil du bon e:enseignant, mais plus d'exigences …

clare o'shea's curator insight, February 5, 2015 1:49 PM

and ask indviduals questions every 2-3 minutes - but always label the behaviour first! so it is a positive experience not a catching out!!

Linda Buckmaster's curator insight, January 10, 4:57 PM

"Even more than other types of education, eLearning must struggle to attract learners' attention: the Internet is full of distractions.. Helping students to pay attention is a primary concern of training professionals, so here are some optimal methods to win the attention game in eLearning."

Rescooped by michel verstrepen from Gérer son information et ses archives de vie
Scoop.it!

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics

Students as Curators of Their Learning Topics | blended learning | Scoop.it

Robin Good: Must-read article on ClutterMuseum.com by Leslie M-B, exploring in depth the opportunity to have students master their selected topics by "curating" them, rather than by reading and memorizing facts about them.

 

"Critical and creative thinking should be prioritized over remembering content"

 

"That students should learn to think for themselves may seem like a no-brainer to many readers, but if you look at the textbook packages put out by publishers, you’ll find that the texts and accompanying materials (for both teachers and students) assume students are expected to read and retain content—and then be tested on it.

 

Instead, between middle school (if not earlier) and college graduation, students should practice—if not master—how to question, critique, research, and construct an argument like an historian."

 

This is indeed the critical point. Moving education from an effort to memorize things on which then to be tested, to a collaborative exercise in creating new knowledge and value by pulling and editing together individual pieces of content, resources and tools that allow the explanation/illustration of a topic from a specific viewpoint/for a specific need.

 

And I can't avoid to rejoice and second her next proposition: "What if we shifted the standards’ primary emphasis from content, and not to just the development of traditional skills—basic knowledge recall, document interpretation, research, and essay-writing—but to the cultivation of skills that challenge students to make unconventional connections, skills that are essential for thriving in the 21st century?"

 

What are these skills, you may ask. Here is a good reference where to look them up: http://www.p21.org/storage/documents/P21_Framework_Definitions.pdf (put together by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills)

 

 

Recommended. Good stuff. 9/10

 

Full article: www.cluttermuseum.com/make-students-curators/

 

(Image credit: Behance.net)

 

 


Via Robin Good, Paul Thielen
more...
Education Creations's curator insight, May 12, 2014 12:00 AM

How to turn students into curators.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:14 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing, but they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access any social media, but rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we could start thinking about what is possible and lobbying for change.

Sample Student's curator insight, May 5, 2015 10:18 PM

We often ask our students to create annotated bibliographies, and this focuses on their capacity to evaluate and make decisions about the validity, reliability and relevance of sources they have found. Using Scoop.it, we can ask them to do much the same thing. But they will publish their ideas for an audience, and will also be able to provide and use peer feedback to enhance and tighten up their thinking. This is relevant to any age, and any curriculum area. Of course it is dependent on schools being able to access social media. But rather than thinking about what is impossible, perhaps we should start thinking about what is possible, and lobbying for change. Could you use a Scoop.it collection as an assessment task?

Rescooped by michel verstrepen from Agile Learning
Scoop.it!

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead?

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead? | blended learning | Scoop.it

"Is it really about teaching more, in less time, with shrinking budgets?  Or are we doing our brains & our bottom line a disservice, including conference event planning?"  

 

This is a great post on how to leverage learning that sticks, is sticky, vs. a spray and pray approach that still, unfortunately, dominates training programs and many conference events.

 

Here's an excerpt of this great post by 

 

Fresh thinking about how we learn
There are two kinds of learning. Learning physical tasks, like how to snowboard...embedded through repetition in the deeper motor regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia. This is known as procedural memory.


For workplace learning to be useful, we need to be able to recall ideas easily. 


In the last decade, Neuroscientists discovered that whether an idea can be easily recalled is linked to the strength of activation of the hippocampus during a learning task.


Many corporate training programs are the mental equivalent of trying to eat a week of meals in a day.

 

With this finding, scientists such as Lila Davachi at NYU and others have been able to test out many variables involved in learning experiences, such as what happens to the hippocampus if you distract people while absorbing information.

 

Over a few months of collaboration, Lila Davachi and I, along with Tobias Keifer, a consultant from Booz & Co., found a useful pattern that summarized the four biggest factors that determined the quality of recall. These are:

Attention,  Generation,  Emotion and  Spacing, or the ‘AGES’ model. 

The AGES model was first presented at the 2010 NeuroLeadership Summit, and then published in the 2010 NeuroLeadership Journal. Read the full post including Learning that lasts through AGES that has a summary of this important research here.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by michel verstrepen from Teaching in the XXI Century
Scoop.it!

Digital Learning should be Personalized Learning

Digital Learning should be Personalized Learning | blended learning | Scoop.it

Learning is most effective when it’s personalised. That happens when people feel they are participants in their own learning, shaping what and how they learn, and able to articulate its value to them.


Via Smaragda Papadopoulou, João Greno Brogueira
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by michel verstrepen from Business and Economics: E-Learning and Blended Learning
Scoop.it!

Blended-Learning Profiles | Innosight Institute

Blended-Learning Profiles | Innosight Institute | blended learning | Scoop.it

The following profiles provide brief case studies of organizations that are beginning to blend online learning with supervised brick-and-mortar settings.


Via Elmer Seward, Jenny Pesina
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by michel verstrepen
Scoop.it!

Building An Online Learning Community by Kevin Wilcoxon : Learning Solutions Magazine

Building An Online Learning Community by Kevin Wilcoxon : Learning Solutions Magazine | blended learning | Scoop.it

How can an instructional designer (ID) leverage social interaction online to engage learners, increase exchange and dialogue, and get better results, without losing the purposeful focus provided by an instructor or traditional course content and structure? Many IDs are intrigued by the potential of communal experiences online, but there is a great deal of uncertainty about how to proceed. Here are a couple of cases that you may find interesting. Afterward, I offer a roadmap for producing similar results.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by michel verstrepen from gpmt
Scoop.it!

5 Videos That Describe New Learning

5 Videos That Describe New Learning | blended learning | Scoop.it
These five videos help describe new learning, including project-based learning, game-based learning, and mobile learning.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Tania Grosz, Jim Lerman, michel verstrepen
michel verstrepen's insight:

New learning ...

more...
Ricard Garcia's curator insight, August 9, 2013 4:29 AM

And they are really worth watching!

LundTechIntegration's curator insight, August 9, 2013 10:06 AM

Great videos that inspire us to help our kids become 21st Century Learners. 

Tom McGuire's comment, August 10, 2013 9:46 AM
Thank you
Rescooped by michel verstrepen from 21st Century Tools for Teaching-People and Learners
Scoop.it!

Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White

Understanding the Value of Curation for Education: Nancy White | blended learning | Scoop.it

Robin Good: What does curation mean from an educational viewpoint? And what is the key difference between "collecting" and "curating".

Nancy White (@NancyW), a 21st Century Learning & Innovation Specialist and the author of Innovations in Education blog, has written an excellent article, dissecting the key characterizing traits of curation, as a valuable resource to create and share knowledge. 

 

She truly distills some key traits of curation in a way that is clear and comprehensible to anyone.

 

She writes: "The first thing I realized is that in order to have value-added benefits to curating information, the collector needs to move beyond just classifying the objects under a certain theme to deeper thinking through a) synthesis and b) evaluation of the collected items.

 

How are they connected?"

 

Excellent definition. 

 

And then she also frames perfectly the relevance of "context" for any meaningful curation project by writing: "I believe when we curate, organization moves beyond thematic to contextual – as we start to build knowledge and understanding with each new resource that we curate.

 

Themes have a common unifying element – but don’t necessarily explain the “why.”

 

Theme supports a central idea – Context allows the learner to determine why that idea (or in this case, resource) is important.

 

So, as collecting progresses into curating, context becomes essential to determine what to keep, and what to discard."

 

But there's a lot more insight distilled in this article as Nancy captures with elegance the difference between collecting for a personal interest and curating for a specific audience. 

 

She finally steals my full endorsement for this article by discretely inquirying how great a value it would be to allow students to "curate" the domains of interest they need to master.

 

Excellent. Highly recommended. 9/10

 

Full article: http://d20innovation.d20blogs.org/2012/07/07/understanding-content-curation/ ;


Via Robin Good, Gust MEES
more...
Beth Kanter's comment, July 8, 2012 1:22 PM
I especially like how she used the Bloom's Taxonomy and related that to curation.
Stalder Angèle's comment, August 1, 2012 3:56 AM
Thank you for this scoop!
Shaz J's comment, August 5, 2012 10:39 AM
Thanks for this!
Rescooped by michel verstrepen from eLearning Models & Resources
Scoop.it!

Hybrid Peer-to-Peer Learning - Video

Example, using simple algebra, for demonstrating hybrid (or blended) learning.

 

It incorporates many of the same teaching methods as traditional classroom learning.

 

Thesys International provides a brief introduction to how the "Peer-to-Peer Learning" Method can work in Hybrid Learning.


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN, Jetmir Troshani
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by michel verstrepen from E-Learning
Scoop.it!

Can virtual classrooms change the way we learn?

Can virtual classrooms change the way we learn? | blended learning | Scoop.it
Online coursework brings lessons to anyone with a computer, but does it forget the importance of trained educators?

Via Minter Dial
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by michel verstrepen from Interactive Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

The Complexity Of Learning

The Complexity Of Learning | blended learning | Scoop.it
Have been reading about the science of ‘Complexity’ recently, and find that many of the aspects described apply equally well to learning.

Via Angel Sandoval, João Greno Brogueira, Anne Whaits
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by michel verstrepen
Scoop.it!

Harold Jarche » Social learning: the freedom to act and cooperate with others

Harold Jarche » Social learning: the freedom to act and cooperate with others | blended learning | Scoop.it

The networked information economy improves the practical capacities of individuals along three dimensions: (1) it improves their capacity to do more for and by themselves; (2) it enhances their capacity to do more in loose commonality with others, without being constrained to organize their relationship through a price system or in traditional hierarchical models of social and economic organization; and (3) it improves the capacity of individuals to do more in formal organizations that operate outside the market sphere. This enhanced autonomy is at the core of all the other improvements I describe. Individuals are using their newly expanded practical freedom to act and cooperate with others in ways that improve the practiced experience of democracy, justice and development, a critical culture, and community.

more...
No comment yet.