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10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning)

10 Things That Learners Pay Attention To (And How to Use Them in eLearning) | blended learning | Scoop.it

"Even more than other types of education, eLearning must struggle to attract learners' attention: the Internet is full of distractions, and adult learners are both busier and more free to indulge in distractions. Helping students to pay attention is a primary concern of training professionalsso here are some optimal methods to win the attention game in eLearning."


Via Beth Dichter
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Audrey's curator insight, October 3, 2014 1:26 PM

These are certainly true.  Have a look at www.hotmoodle.com

 

Bernard VULLIERME's curator insight, October 20, 2014 5:30 AM

Rien de nouveau sous le soleil du bon e:enseignant, mais plus d'exigences …

clare o'shea's curator insight, February 5, 2015 1:49 PM

and ask indviduals questions every 2-3 minutes - but always label the behaviour first! so it is a positive experience not a catching out!!

Rescooped by michel verstrepen from Curation, Social Business and Beyond
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How the Science of Attention is Changing Work and Education

How the Science of Attention is Changing Work and Education | blended learning | Scoop.it

Fascinating review by Maria Popova, from Brainpickings on Cathy Davidson's, (Founder of Duke University’s Center for Cognitive Neuroscience) new book "Now You See It".

 

Intro:

 

How the Brain Science of Attention Will Transform the Way We Live, Work, and Learn — a fascinating meditation on how “attention blindness,” the peculiar phenomenon illustrated by Harvard’s famous invisible gorilla experiment, has produced one of our culture’s greatest disconnects, the inability to reconcile the remarkable changes induced by the digital age with the conventions of yesteryear’s schools and workplaces.

 

 "As long as we focus on the object we know, we will miss the new one we need to see. The process of unlearning in order to relearn demands a new concept of knowledge not as thing but as a process, not as a noun but as a verb.” ~ Cathy Davidson

 

http://www.brainpickings.org/index.php/2011/08/19/now-you-see-it-cathy-davidson/

 


Via janlgordon
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The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead?

The Dangers of Pasteurized Learning - Brain speedy or Brain dead? | blended learning | Scoop.it

"Is it really about teaching more, in less time, with shrinking budgets?  Or are we doing our brains & our bottom line a disservice, including conference event planning?"  

 

This is a great post on how to leverage learning that sticks, is sticky, vs. a spray and pray approach that still, unfortunately, dominates training programs and many conference events.

 

Here's an excerpt of this great post by 

 

Fresh thinking about how we learn
There are two kinds of learning. Learning physical tasks, like how to snowboard...embedded through repetition in the deeper motor regions of the brain such as the basal ganglia. This is known as procedural memory.


For workplace learning to be useful, we need to be able to recall ideas easily. 


In the last decade, Neuroscientists discovered that whether an idea can be easily recalled is linked to the strength of activation of the hippocampus during a learning task.


Many corporate training programs are the mental equivalent of trying to eat a week of meals in a day.

 

With this finding, scientists such as Lila Davachi at NYU and others have been able to test out many variables involved in learning experiences, such as what happens to the hippocampus if you distract people while absorbing information.

 

Over a few months of collaboration, Lila Davachi and I, along with Tobias Keifer, a consultant from Booz & Co., found a useful pattern that summarized the four biggest factors that determined the quality of recall. These are:

Attention,  Generation,  Emotion and  Spacing, or the ‘AGES’ model. 

The AGES model was first presented at the 2010 NeuroLeadership Summit, and then published in the 2010 NeuroLeadership Journal. Read the full post including Learning that lasts through AGES that has a summary of this important research here.

 


Via Deb Nystrom, REVELN
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