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Framing the Learning in the Blended Learning Environment - Getting Smart by Guest Author - #blendchat, blended learning, Competency-based learning, edchat

Framing the Learning in the Blended Learning Environment - Getting Smart by Guest Author - #blendchat, blended learning, Competency-based learning, edchat | Blended Learning | Scoop.it
In a high quality competency based learning model, competencies are designed on conceptual understandings within and between a content areas.

Via Thomas Faltin
Kloo Hansen's insight:

If you are doubtful about Blended Learning's level of rigor, you might consider reading this :)

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Meleny Weber's curator insight, October 14, 2013 4:33 PM
This blog entry titled from the blog “Getting Smart”, is about blending learning, and the common misconceptions about it. This entry is interesting because it shows a different side to the topic, and goes further than just explaining what blended learning is. The first misconception the author brings up is the fact that many people think it lacks the rigor found in a “normal” classroom. She then goes on to say that students learn the same amount of information just in a different way. This way is more catered to them, so they learn more without all the struggling. I completely agree with her on this. For example, in a typical classroom there are 30 or so students. Not every single student is going to be on the same level as one another. A teacher may teach one lesson to the class, and only half of them understand it. The teacher has no choice but to move on, making the class more difficult for many students to continue on and catch up. With a flipped classroom or online learning, the students who understand a lesson can move on to the next lesson without waiting for the rest of the class. The students struggling with a specific lesson can receive one-on-one help from the teacher, and learn at his or her own pace. All of the students in the class learn the exact same amount of information as students in a normal classroom, but at varying rates. She ends her blog entry by saying that we should try our best to create a challenging classroom no matter where that may be; online or in a room, we should all have the same goals in mind. I really like the way she ends her entry. Such a strong statement (that I wrote in my own words) really leaves the reader thinking about what was said. I agree that it should not matter where a student learns, as long as they are being challenged; it is a good and successful classroom. It's interesting to me that some people think Blended Learning is not as challenging for students. To me it isn't about which way of learning is harder, it is about which method allows each and every student to learn to his or her full potential. If Blended Learning allows more one-on-one time with the teacher, I feel as though that is more beneficial to the students.
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Rescooped by Kloo Hansen from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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3 Ways to Encourage Higher Order Thinking with Technology - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - blended learning, common core, digital learning, EdTech, Innovation

3 Ways to Encourage Higher Order Thinking with Technology - Getting Smart by Susan Oxnevad - blended learning, common core, digital learning, EdTech, Innovation | Blended Learning | Scoop.it
Here are three ways for teachers to prepare to design learning experiences that encourage higher order thinking through the use of technology as a tool for learning.

Via Thomas Faltin
Kloo Hansen's insight:

Here at Spring Valley we try to encourage the use of the SAMR model. Want to learn how to better understand it, then read this :)

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Rescooped by Kloo Hansen from Educational Technology News
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The Process Approach to Online and Blended Learning

The Process Approach to Online and Blended Learning | Blended Learning | Scoop.it

"“Learning isn’t something that has to be confined to the classroom, and so as I teach blended classes, I think the more I can involve the students in learning and the more contexts I can involve them in, the more they’re going to learn,” he said. “The idea is to get them to slowly digest the information in different ways and to engage in different activities so that by the time the course comes to an end, they can apply the knowledge they have learned. That’s the ultimate goal: to get them to be in a state where they can apply the knowledge.”


Via EDTC@UTB
Kloo Hansen's insight:

This has a wonderful interpretation of how students are processing information and how Blended Learning can re-shape your delivery of content.

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Rescooped by Kloo Hansen from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Mobile learning and blended interaction

Mobile learning and blended interaction | Blended Learning | Scoop.it
Veteran education theorist Michael G. Moore once wrote about three types of interaction. Learners interact, he said, with content, with their teachers and with each other. Other theorists subsequently expanded on this interactional triumvirate.

Via Thomas Faltin
Kloo Hansen's insight:

Consider the concept of time-space compression further, here. A new level of student to student and teacher to student interaction is here and we need to start embracing it. :)

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Rescooped by Kloo Hansen from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
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Schools Tackle Common Core Math Standards with Blended Learning

Schools Tackle Common Core Math Standards with Blended Learning | Blended Learning | Scoop.it
Four Oakland Unified School District schools have found success in utilizing blended learning models to enhance Common Core math standards integration.

Via Mel Riddile
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Sabrina Martinez's curator insight, March 6, 10:19 AM

this article is talking about all the things that people are trying to do to teach kids or adults on things. Like the struggles and the good things that go with it. So for this article i think that it has to go with with success and proving that you are smart.

Rescooped by Kloo Hansen from Kenya School Report - 21st Century Learning and Teaching
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Blended Learning Infographic plus Free Implementation Guide

Blended Learning Infographic plus Free Implementation Guide | Blended Learning | Scoop.it
Schools that make the most effective use of new technology will incorporate an intentional shift to online delivery for a portion of the day to make learning

Via Abraham Tumuti
Kloo Hansen's insight:

Although targeted to schools looking to get where we are already, this infographic can help you think about a blended platform. 

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Rescooped by Kloo Hansen from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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Framing the Learning in the Blended Learning Environment - Getting Smart by Guest Author - #blendchat, blended learning, Competency-based learning, edchat

Framing the Learning in the Blended Learning Environment - Getting Smart by Guest Author - #blendchat, blended learning, Competency-based learning, edchat | Blended Learning | Scoop.it
In a high quality competency based learning model, competencies are designed on conceptual understandings within and between a content areas.

Via Thomas Faltin
Kloo Hansen's insight:

If you are doubtful about Blended Learning's level of rigor, you might consider reading this :)

more...
Meleny Weber's curator insight, October 14, 2013 4:33 PM
This blog entry titled from the blog “Getting Smart”, is about blending learning, and the common misconceptions about it. This entry is interesting because it shows a different side to the topic, and goes further than just explaining what blended learning is. The first misconception the author brings up is the fact that many people think it lacks the rigor found in a “normal” classroom. She then goes on to say that students learn the same amount of information just in a different way. This way is more catered to them, so they learn more without all the struggling. I completely agree with her on this. For example, in a typical classroom there are 30 or so students. Not every single student is going to be on the same level as one another. A teacher may teach one lesson to the class, and only half of them understand it. The teacher has no choice but to move on, making the class more difficult for many students to continue on and catch up. With a flipped classroom or online learning, the students who understand a lesson can move on to the next lesson without waiting for the rest of the class. The students struggling with a specific lesson can receive one-on-one help from the teacher, and learn at his or her own pace. All of the students in the class learn the exact same amount of information as students in a normal classroom, but at varying rates. She ends her blog entry by saying that we should try our best to create a challenging classroom no matter where that may be; online or in a room, we should all have the same goals in mind. I really like the way she ends her entry. Such a strong statement (that I wrote in my own words) really leaves the reader thinking about what was said. I agree that it should not matter where a student learns, as long as they are being challenged; it is a good and successful classroom. It's interesting to me that some people think Blended Learning is not as challenging for students. To me it isn't about which way of learning is harder, it is about which method allows each and every student to learn to his or her full potential. If Blended Learning allows more one-on-one time with the teacher, I feel as though that is more beneficial to the students.
Rescooped by Kloo Hansen from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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ExcelinEd Summit Focused on Students - Getting Smart by Getting Smart Staff - blended learning, DigLN, edreform, EdTech, EIE13, Online Learning

ExcelinEd Summit Focused on Students - Getting Smart by Getting Smart Staff - blended learning, DigLN, edreform, EdTech, EIE13, Online Learning | Blended Learning | Scoop.it
The sessions at this year’s National Summit on Education Reform reflected growing recognition of the potential of personalized, digital learning to improve student access to high-quality educational options across the board.

Via Thomas Faltin
Kloo Hansen's insight:

See interpretations of Blended Learning at the national scale. 

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Rescooped by Kloo Hansen from Digital-News on Scoop.it today
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The Tao of Blended Learning - Getting Smart by John Hardison - #blendchat, BlendedLearning, edchat, EdTech

The Tao of Blended Learning - Getting Smart by John Hardison - #blendchat, BlendedLearning, edchat, EdTech | Blended Learning | Scoop.it
Ever wonder what Bruce Lee would say about blended learning? Enter the Tao of Blended Learning.

Via Thomas Faltin
Kloo Hansen's insight:

This one if for the English Department ;)

 

John Hardison does a fantastic job interpreting the concept of Blended Learning, and how we should really take advatage of the liberating forces of this model. 

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Steve Klien's curator insight, November 9, 2013 7:16 PM

Tao of blended learning

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Blended Learning: A Classroom Catalyst | Blend My Learning

Blended Learning: A Classroom Catalyst | Blend My Learning | Blended Learning | Scoop.it
My blended learning pilot has reconfigured the information circuit in my classroom. It has served as a catalyst for connecting students with more of what they need when they need it through one of three pathways: a computer, ...
Kloo Hansen's insight:

An outstanding account of Blended Learning in a math class. It made me think back to our last Inservice and the wonderful presentation on the CCSS Math Standards. 

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