Blackhole Facts - Aspect 3
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HubbleSite: Black Holes: Gravity's Relentless Pull interactive: Encyclopedia

HubbleSite: Black Holes: Gravity's Relentless Pull interactive: Encyclopedia | Blackhole Facts - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
Black Holes: Gravity's Relentless Pull. Information, virtual journeys, and simulations about black holes from the Space Telescope Science Institute
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caitlyn kosko's comment, March 25, 2013 6:58 PM
If a spaceship was to launch into the orbit of a black hole, it could not be too slow (spiraling into the black hole), too fast (flying past the black hole), or intermediate (orbiting in a strange rotation called a rosetta orbit). It would have to be at one certain speed, one of which no one knows, to be able to circularly orbit the black hole.
caitlyn kosko's comment, March 25, 2013 7:36 PM
While black holes do not give off evident light, astronomers are still able to locate and observe them by determining the visible light, X-rays, and radio waves released by matter surrounding a black hole. “For example, when a normal star orbits around a black hole astronomers can measure the speed of the star by studying the visible light that it emits. Knowledge of this speed can be combined with the laws of gravity to prove that the star is in fact orbiting a black hole, instead of something else. It also yields the mass of the black hole. Alternatively, when gas orbits around a black hole it tends to get very hot because of friction. It then starts emitting X-rays and radio waves.” By searching for brilliant supplies of X-rays and radio waves in the atmosphere, black holes can additionally be discovered and analyzed.
caitlyn kosko's comment, March 25, 2013 8:43 PM
Stellar-mass black holes materialize when vast stars existences has ended in “supernova explosions.” Our galaxy encloses 100 billion stars, almost “one out of every thousand stars that form is massive enough to become a black hole.” For that reason, the Milky Way ought to conceal “100 million stellar-mass black holes.” The majority of these we have not recognized, merely a dozen have been observed. 1,600 light years beyond Earth is the closest black hole to us. Through out the perceptible expanse of the Universe from Earth, possibly 100 billion galaxies exist. Each galaxy contains around 100 million stellar-mass black holes. Furthermore, someplace out in space, “a new stellar-mass black hole is born in a supernova every second.”
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David Snoke

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David W. Snoke 

Professor of Physics at University of Pittsburgh

Department of Physics and Astronomy

snoke@pitt.edu

4126249007

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Tami Yaklich's comment, March 21, 2013 11:18 PM
Good interview source!
caitlyn kosko's comment, March 25, 2013 7:19 PM
The main equation you need to understand a black hole is the law U = GMm/r. That is, the energy of a gravity field is equal to the universal gravity constant G, times the mass of the object M, divided by the distance r from its center. U is the energy you need to get an object of mass m to escape the gravity field. This says that the gravity gets stronger as r gets smaller. Therefore a compact object has much stronger gravity pull. The next thing you need to understand is "escape velocity". This is the speed that an object needs to have energy U to escape the gravity field. We find this by equating the kinetic energy E= (1/2)mv^2 to U. (The ^ sign means raise to a power.) This gives us v = sqrt(2GM/r). A black hole occurs when the r is so small that v is greater than the speed of light. If we put c in the above equation, and solve for r, we get r = GM/c^2. This is called the Schwarzschild radius. Anything in closer than this distance cannot escape because nothing can go faster than the speed of light. Even light cannot get out.
caitlyn kosko's comment, March 25, 2013 8:48 PM
It is believed that there is a massive black hole at the center of our galaxy. Notice, by the way, that there is no specific size that a black hole needs to be. It depends on the ratio of the mass to the radius. You could have a small black hole with a small radius, that would still be a black hole.
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Black Holes, Black Holes Information, Facts, News, Photos -- National Geographic

Black Holes, Black Holes Information, Facts, News, Photos -- National Geographic | Blackhole Facts - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
Get information, facts, photos, news, videos, and more about black holes from National Geographic.
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Black Holes - NASA Science

Black Holes - NASA Science | Blackhole Facts - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
Don't let the name fool you: a black hole is anything but empty space.
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caitlyn kosko's comment, March 18, 2013 1:40 AM
Some people may think black holes are just empty space, but that’s not the case. They are a massive amount of matter jammed into a tiny space. Imagine “a star ten times more massive than the Sun squeezed into a sphere approximately the diameter of New York City.” Nothing, including light, can escape from such an immense gravitational pull. NASA instruments have gathered information showing such bizarre things said to be the most mesmerizing objects in space.
caitlyn kosko's comment, March 18, 2013 1:55 AM
Even though the expression didn’t arise until 1967 by John Wheeler, a Princeton physicist, such a thought of something in space so enormous and intense that not even light could not even break away has been discussed for hundreds of years. “Einstein's theory of general relativity“, being most accepted, showed when an immense star died, it collapsed down to a tiny, impenetrable, relic core. “If the core's mass is more than about three times the mass of the Sun, the equations showed, the force of gravity overwhelms all other forces and produces a black hole.”
caitlyn kosko's comment, March 25, 2013 8:15 PM
“NASA's Swift satellite recently detected a rising tide of high-energy X-rays from a source toward the center of our Milky Way galaxy. The outburst, produced by a rare X-ray nova, announced the presence of a previously unknown stellar-mass black hole. ‘Bright X-ray novae are so rare that they're essentially once-a-mission events and this is the first one Swift has seen,’ said Neil Gehrels, the mission's principal investigator, at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. ‘This is really something we've been waiting for.’"
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Charles Gates

Answers to Interview Questions

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Charles Gates

Earth and Space Teacher at Penn Trafford

gates@penntrafford.org 

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Tami Yaklich's comment, March 21, 2013 11:18 PM
Great interview results
caitlyn kosko's comment, March 25, 2013 7:19 PM
It’s essentially a collapsed star that has retained most of its mass. Mathematically, as it collapses and mass is conserved in the system, the density an, therefore the gravity, goes to infinity. So it is matter, as far as we can calculate – the “hole” idea comes form what it does to the space around it.
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Astronomers find biggest black hole ever

Astronomers find biggest black hole ever | Blackhole Facts - Aspect 3 | Scoop.it
Astronomers have discovered what may be the most massive black hole ever known in a small galaxy about 250 million light-years from Earth, scientists say.
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Teacher's Comments!

Senior Research Paper :D

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Tami Yaklich's comment, March 21, 2013 11:18 PM
Only two entries for Aspect 3?