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Rescooped by ciara from Indigenous Sovereignty
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MLK vs. Malcom X

Two extremely intelligent, extremely articulate civil rights leaders with very different approaches.

Via Jacqueline Keeler
ciara's insight:

In history , everyone knows that no two great men are alike. And when you compare Martin Luther King and Malcolm X, you will know instantly that such is true. There are many differences between the two, apart from the striking one: that Martin Luther King was a very good statesman who delivered moving speeches about peace, freedom and democracy while Malcolm X was a known eradicator of those who were not of the superior white race.
Dr. Martin Luther king Jr. and Malcom X although both great men came from different backgrounds and had different views MLK believed in nonviolence while on the other hand Malcom x views were tinted to get back at the whit man

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Rescooped by ciara from Chestnut Black History Page
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The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow and "Separate But Equal"

The Rise and Fall of Jim Crow and "Separate But Equal" | Black history | Scoop.it

Check here for an overview of the history of the "Jim Crow" laws and the "Separate But Equal" policies established in the  "Plessey vs. Fergusson" and overturned in "Brown vs. Board of Education" court cases.


Via Bill Brown
ciara's insight:

Many cases were brought to the surpreme court .Some cases ruled just although the laws were counted as fair in the eyes of most people,Examples of those cases are plessy vs fergusson and Brown vs board of education

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ashley fluker's curator insight, February 2, 2015 5:42 PM

This photo shows how whites water fountains were very up scaled and fancy when the blacks had to drink out of a fountain with all of the pipes showing and room temperature water. The whites felt like the blacks were not there equal.

herman dallis's curator insight, February 4, 2015 8:34 PM

Even though slavery was beginning to turn around for the most part or as we would say attempts was still made to end it blacks still was a slave to society with the separation of drinking fountain and bathrooms this really showed how things had continued to go and would be if change wasn't still in the making we believe even after they tried to end slavery whites still wanted slaves to feel as if they were not equal by attempting to have spate things as these

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Rosa Parks Bus - The Story Behind the Bus

Rosa Parks Bus - The Story Behind the Bus | Black history | Scoop.it

Via Plazmapkmn
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Rosa is considered to be a mother too many for standing up for what she believes in.Rosa was concerned about freedom,equality, justice and prosperity for all people.Her unselfish acts led to later

The U.S. Congress calling her “the first lady of civil rights“, and “the mother of the freedom movement“

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Plazmapkmn's curator insight, February 27, 2013 10:01 AM

This is the official site of the musem where the bus Rosa sat on is kept.

 

There is a whole page all about Rosa Parks.

melitotodman's curator insight, February 5, 2015 1:25 AM

Leading to the Montgomery Bus boycott, Rosa Parks defend not only her rights of a women, but also the rights for African Americans. The movement encourage Martin Luther King Jr. (MLK) to make his I have a dream speech. 

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A Look Back • In St. Louis visit, MLK appeals for end to racism, starting in ... - STLtoday.com

A Look Back • In St. Louis visit, MLK appeals for end to racism, starting in ... - STLtoday.com | Black history | Scoop.it
A Look Back • In St. Louis visit, MLK appeals for end to racism, starting in ...
STLtoday.com
Martin Luther King Jr., 28 years old and suddenly prominent as leader of the lengthy boycott that integrated public buses in Montgomery, Ala., in 1956.

Via Andre M Hare
ciara's insight:

Martin Luther giving a speech infront of a mixed race audience.Delegates to the National Council of Churches convention gather in Kiel Auditorium on Dec. 2, 1957, for the second day of their national assembly. The organization of mainline Protestant denominations held conventions every three years. About 2,000 delegates took part during the six-day event. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. gave two speeches to the assembly

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Andre M Hare's curator insight, February 5, 2014 10:17 AM

Martin Luther giving a speech infront of a mixed race audience.Delegates to the National Council of Churches convention gather in Kiel Auditorium on Dec. 2, 1957, for the second day of their national assembly. The organization of mainline Protestant denominations held conventions every three years. About 2,000 delegates took part during the six-day event. The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. gave two speeches to the assembly

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The Stand in the School House

"The Stand in the Schoolhouse Door took place at Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963.George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, in a symbolic attempt to keep his inaugural promise of "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever" and stop the desegregation of schools, stood at the door of the auditorium to try to block the entry of two black students, Vivian Malone Jones and James Hood.[1]

The incident brought George Wallace into the national spotlight."


Via Jaynus Wheeler, Amber Shea Tomasson, Kristen Fields
ciara's insight:

On a scorching june day in 1963, James Hood and Vivian Malone became the first black students to enroll successfully at the university of alabama defying Governor George Wallace Jr.’s symbolic — and vitriolic — ‘‘stand in the schoolhouse door.’’ this is an eample of racial sergregation going on in the south of this time frame

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De'Andre King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 9:54 PM

This stand created a very insecure statue between blacks and whites. I feel like the Governor showed a public display of sentiment and he had no right. As a political leader you should not verbally or physically take sides in community disputes, but aim to peacefully negotiate the result.