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'Tent City' - October 1960 - Civil Rights - A Jackson Sun Special Report

'Tent City' - October 1960 - Civil Rights - A Jackson Sun Special Report | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
On the 40th anniversary (1960-2000) of Jackson's civil rights movement, The Jackson Sun is recording - for the first time - the events that led to massive changes in race relations in our community.

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HistoryGroup2ndPeriod's curator insight, January 17, 2014 11:28 AM

This has alot of Civil Rights Events

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Encyclopedia of Alabama: Lee v. Macon County Board of Education

Encyclopedia of Alabama: Lee v. Macon County Board of Education | black-flame-x | Scoop.it

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The Stand in the Schoolhouse Door: From Tuscaloosa to Austin | NAACP LDF

The Stand in the Schoolhouse Door: From Tuscaloosa to Austin | NAACP LDF | black-flame-x | Scoop.it

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Harris Barrett School - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Harris Barrett School - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
Built in 1903 by students of the Tuskegee Normal School, later named Tuskegee Institute and now Tuskegee University. The students made the bricks by hand and built the two room school under the directions of Dr. Booker T. Washington. It was constructed for the descendants of slaves. Located on three acres of land and restored to its originality, today it is a developing historic museum that tells the story of early school life and living in rural Alabama. The school houses the exposition of local African Americans education and achievements from the slave ships to the space ships, highlighting those of Tuskegee Univertity who help develop the NASA project of growing food in space. Tours daily by request.

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Tuskegee Heritage Museum - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Tuskegee Heritage Museum - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
Artifacts of the Creek Indians, plus memorabilia relating to Booker T. Washington, Dr. George Washington Carver, the Tuskegee Airmen, etc.

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George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum - Dothan, Alabama

George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum - Dothan, Alabama | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
The George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum is a historical museum in Dotha

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Tuskegee Heritage Museum - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Tuskegee Heritage Museum - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
Artifacts of the Creek Indians, plus memorabilia relating to Booker T. Washington, Dr. George Washington Carver, the Tuskegee Airmen, etc.

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CLU marks anniversary of King's jail letter - CLU News

CLU marks anniversary of King's jail letter - CLU News | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
California Lutheran University will mark the 50th anniversary of the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr.’s “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” with a reading and discussion.

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Chris Kimball's curator insight, March 26, 2013 11:16 PM

An important event about an important document in American History.

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Letter from a Birmingham Jail

16 April 1963
My Dear Fellow Clergymen:
While confined here in the Birmingham city jail, I came across your recent statement calling my present activities "unwise and untimely." Seldom do I pause to answer criticism of my work and ideas. If I sought to answer all the criticisms that cross my desk, my secretaries would have little time for anything other than such correspondence in the course of the day, and I would have no time for constructive work. But since I feel that you are men of genuine good will and that your criticisms are sincerely set forth, I want to try to answer your statement in what I hope will be patient and reasonable terms.

I think I should indicate why I am here in Birmingham, since you have been influenced by the view which argues against "outsiders coming in." I have the honor of serving as president of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, an organization operating in every southern state, with headquarters in Atlanta, Georgia. We have some eighty five affiliated organizations across the South, and one of them is the Alabama Christian Movement for Human Rights. Frequently we share staff, educational and financial resources with our affiliates. Several months ago the affiliate here in Birmingham asked us to be on call to engage in a nonviolent direct action program if such were deemed necessary. We readily consented, and when the hour came we lived up to our promise. So I, along with several members of my staff, am here because I was invited here. I am here because I have organizational ties here.

But more basically, I am in Birmingham because injustice is here. Just as the prophets of the eighth century B.C. left their villages and carried their "thus saith the Lord" far beyond the boundaries of their home towns, and just as the Apostle Paul left his village of Tarsus and carried the gospel of Jesus Christ to the far corners of the Greco Roman world, so am I compelled to carry the gospel of freedom beyond my own home town. Like Paul, I must constantly respond to the Macedonian call for aid.

Moreover, I am cognizant of the interrelatedness of all communities and states. I cannot sit idly by in Atlanta and not be concerned about what happens in Birmingham. Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere. We are caught in an inescapable network of mutuality, tied in a single garment of destiny. Whatever affects one directly, affects all indirectly. Never again can we afford to live with the narrow, provincial "outside agitator" idea. Anyone who lives inside the United States can never be considered an outsider anywhere within its bounds.

You deplore the demonstrations taking place in Birmingham. But your statement, I am sorry to say, fails to express a similar concern for the conditions that brought about the demonstrations. I am sure that none of you would want to rest content with the superficial kind of social analysis that deals merely with effects and does not grapple with underlying causes. It is unfortunate that demonstrations are taking place in Birmingham, but it is even more unfortunate that the city's white power structure left the Negro community with no alternative.

In any nonviolent campaign there are four basic steps: collection of the facts to determine whether injustices exist; negotiation; self purification; and direct action. We have gone through all these steps in Birmingham. There can be no gainsaying the fact that racial injustice engulfs this community. Birmingham is probably the most thoroughly segregated city in the United States. Its ugly record of brutality is widely known. Negroes have experienced grossly unjust treatment in the courts. There have been more unsolved bombings of Negro homes and churches in Birmingham than in any other city in the nation. These are the hard, brutal facts of the case. On the basis of these conditions, Negro leaders sought to negotiate with the city fathers. But the latter consistently refused to engage in good faith negotiation.


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Southfield library hostscivil rights author - Hometownlife.com

Southfield library hostscivil rights author
Hometownlife.com
12, at 7 p.m. in the Library's Meeting Room.

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Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service)

Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site (U.S. National Park Service) | black-flame-x | Scoop.it

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Zorayda Lopez's curator insight, January 27, 2014 2:04 PM

This museum has a lot of historical stuff about the Tuskegee Airmen. This national park is located in Tuskegee, Alabama so you can see a lot of places were the airmen were training and participating at. Many schools around the country and world go to the national park to see actual things that were involed during the World War II that effected the Airmen. This park contains many different materials than the type of materials that we use today. This park teachers people the uses of science, engineering, and technology to understand and better manage these spectacular resources. They also  encourage you to experience for yourself the natural soundscapes and lightscapes of many national parks and see the different things in this wonderful world. This park is a primay source when trying to get more information about the Tuskegee Airmen because you can actually see were they were at and what kind of this they had and went through.

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Montgomery Bus Boycott: The story of Rosa Parks and the Civil Rights Movement

A site about Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott


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Plazmapkmn's curator insight, February 27, 2013 9:47 AM

Good resources for my project

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Tuskegee Confederate Monument - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Tuskegee Confederate Monument - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
Monument erected in 1906 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in memory of Confederate soldiers from Macon County. Scene of 1960s civil rights activities.

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Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center

Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center

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Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center

Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center

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Remembering the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery | The Christian Century

Remembering the 1965 civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery | The Christian Century | black-flame-x | Scoop.it
In 1965, MLK asked religious leaders to come to Selma and march. Decades later, plans are taking shape in Montgomery to honor those who came.

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Selma to Montgomery March

The Selma to Montgomery marches, also known as Bloody Sunday and the two marches that followed, were marches and protests held in 1965 that marked the political and emotional peak of the American civil rights movement. All three were attempts to march from Selma to Montgomery where the Alabama capitol is located. The marches grew out of the voting rights movement in Selma, launched by local African-Americans who formed the Dallas County Voters League (DCVL). In 1963, the DCVL and organizers from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began voter-registration work. When white resistance to black voter registration proved intractable, the DCVL requested the assistance of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, who brought many prominent civil rights and civic leaders to support voting rights.

 

The first march took place on March 7, 1965 — "Bloody Sunday" — when 600 marchers, protesting the death of Jimmie Lee Jackson and ongoing exclusion from the electoral process, were attacked by state and local police with billy clubs and tear gas. The second march took place March 9; police forced 2,500 protesters to turn around after crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

The third march started March 16. Protected by 2,000 soldiers of the U.S. Army, 1,900 members of the Alabama National Guard under Federal command, and many FBI agents and Federal Marshals, the marchers averaged 10 miles (16 km) a day along U.S. Route 80, known in Alabama as the "Jefferson Davis Highway". The marchers arrived in Montgomery on March 24 and at the Alabama State Capitol on March 25.

The route is memorialized as the Selma To Montgomery Voting Rights Trail, and is a U.S. National Historic Trail.


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