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BLACK AND WHITE
Wonderful black and white photography
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Scrap metal collectors | Photojournalist: Javier Manzano

Scrap metal collectors | Photojournalist: Javier Manzano | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

On the periphery of Bagram Airfield, farmers, scrap-metal collectors and sheep herders have been crippled, blinded and burned by U.S. military ammunition on an unfenced and poorly marked training ground.

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Full article : http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/next-to-us-firing-range-in-afghanistan-a-village-of-victims/2012/05/26/gJQAeQEIsU_story.html

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Mughli – The Lonely Mother | Altaf Qadri

Mughli – The Lonely Mother | Altaf Qadri | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"All the stories I have worked on, have their own importance in my life and all of them are memorable in one-way or the other. But the story, which still haunts me, is about Mughli-The Lonely Mother. I have seen how that old woman struggled each passing day. I have seen her visit police stations pleading with officers to get a clue of her missing son, who was born after she was divorced. I have seen her crying in the solitude of her home, with the result she could barely see. I have seen her at Sufi shrines praying for the return of her only son.


She lived 19 years in solitude and pain. However she was always hopeful to see her missing son once again which she never did. I feel extremely sorry that Mughli died without a closure. I got a feeling that she liked it when I used to visit her, maybe she was trying to see her son in me and I also liked to give her as much as company I could. It seems that our relation had moved beyond from being a subject and a photographer. During our last meeting in summer of 2009, I had promised her to meet again once I’ll be back from my assignment in Afghanistan but unfortunately I could never see her again."- Altaf Qadri

Photo report's insight:

Altaf Qadri is an award winning photographer who works for the The Associated Press. His photographs and stories from events in Kashmir have appeared all around the globe including Time, The Guardian, New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Washington Post, and The Times among others. His work has been exhibited in many places including Los Angeles, New York, Paris, Cambodia, New Delhi, Beijing and Mumbai.

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Imaginary play | Photographer: Anna Hurtig

Imaginary play | Photographer: Anna Hurtig | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Someone once said that the happiest time in a persons life is between the age of four and twelve.

The series imaginary play is all about that time in life.
Days filled with make-believe, fantasies, magic and dreams. But also about the bewilderment, sorrows and broken hearts that is part of growing up.

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Yoga performers | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty

Yoga performers | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

There are many interpretations of yoga, both in India and in the western world. In the Vedic religious tradition, yoga is seen as a pathway to achieving spiritual enlightenment through physical training and as a way of living in harmony with your body and nature. It is also an accepted form of gymnastics and is often used as therapy. Yoga, with its Indian roots stretching back 2000 years, is not typically associated with sport since it does not involve any competition. However, every three years, pilgrims, spiritual masters, and yogis travel to India for the Kumbh Mela Hindu feast. Different schools and sects meet to display their achievements in the practice of yoga and pranayama (control over the breath).


It’s the biggest gathering of people in the world. One of Shiva’s manifestations, the god Nataraja, is the patron saint of the event. Over time, the rules of competition were formally organized and most recently, yoga asana has been included in modern sport yoga. Yogis who participate in the contest are separated into age groups and perform in singles, pairs, or groups. But even with all these formal rules and regulations, the technical aspect does not eclipse the spiritual. The official rules of the Yoga Federation of India state that “while performing yoga positions the contestant should show his/her happiness and spirituality.” This helps keep contestants in touch with teachings of the ancient Hindu masters, who regarded happiness as a task well within the reach of all humans.

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Seas Without A Shore | Photographer: Chris Anthony

Seas Without A Shore | Photographer: Chris Anthony | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Los Angeles-based photographer Chris Anthony has been working on this series, Seas Without A Shore, for the past 18 months. Working with wet plate collodion and tintype processes, Anthony photographs objects that mean a lot to him. Mysterious still life, portraits and magical creatures of the sea represent ongoing themes throughout the series: solitude, hope and survival.

Anthony is currently raising money through Kickstarter to fund the publication of Seas Without A Shore which will include over 90 photographs.

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A casual lunchtime snap, or the world's most iconic publicity stunt?

A casual lunchtime snap, or the world's most iconic publicity stunt? | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
This photograph of construction workers casually eating their lunch on a skyscraper beam suspended high about Manhattan can lay claim to being one of the 20th century's most recognisable images.

 

Yet, in the run up to its 80th anniversary today it has emerged that, far from catching the subjects unaware, the image was set up as a publicity shot for the Rockefeller Center.

The identity of the photographer of Lunch Atop a Skyscraper is unknown. He or she was among a pack of snappers sent by news agencies to cover the event at the RCA Building. Another, less celebrated, image shows the workers pretending to be asleep on the beam.

Ken Johnston, chief historian and archivist for Corbis Images, which owns the rights to the photo, said: "The image was a publicity effort by the Rockefeller Center.It seems pretty clear they were real workers, but the event was organised with a number of photographers."

The photograph was taken on 20 September 1932, during the construction of the RCA site – later renamed the GE Building – which forms part of the Rockefeller Center.

The original caption on the photo marked that it would be the largest office building in New York City, the archivist said.

 

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Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold

Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The sacred tattoos in Thailand are much more than just an art form, and with a culture deeply rooted in superstition and spirituality, such tattoos are believed to have magical and healing powers. Thai men and also women have their sacred tattoos done at Buddhist temples, for protection against evil spirits, and as good luck charms.

Cedric Arnold's website tells that these sacred tattoos can be scripts based on ancient Khmer, and the original Buddhist Pali, along with figures and mythical creatures. Using large-format and Polaroid cameras, formal black-and-white portraits were made of boxers, monks, construction workers, policemen, soldiers, taxi drivers, shipyards workers, a shaman, and tattoo masters.

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Muay Thai Bangkok | Photographer : Mark Carey

Muay Thai Bangkok | Photographer : Mark Carey | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Here's a gallery of monochrome photographs of Muay Thai training made in Bangkok by the talented Mark Carey. These appealed to me as they were photographed away from the glitzy lights of the top Muay Thai arenas in Bangkok, but show the rather edgy side of the sport...as I tried to do in my recent photo essay of the Muay Thai ring in Loi Kroh Road in Chiang Mai. 

Mark Carey is a London-based documentary photographer, who tells us he never had an interest in photographing posed or set-up shots, whether for his wedding photography or during his travels. I think he somewhat bent his rule with some of the frames of the non Thai fighter in the Muay Thai series, but these are the exception and are well worth adding to the gallery...the fellow looks absolutely fierce.

Muay Thai is a combat fight practiced in Thailand, and referred to as the "Art of Eight Limbs" because it makes use of punches, kicks, elbows and knee strikes, thus using eight "points of contact".

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Black and white | Photographer: Hengki Koentjoro

Black and white | Photographer: Hengki Koentjoro | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Amazing black and white photographs by Indonesian photographer Hengki Koentjoro.

 

Hengki Koentjoro was born in March 24, 1963 in Semarang, central java, Indonesia. He acquired his knowledge of multimedia production at brooks institute of photography, Santa Barbara, California, USA. Majoring in video production with minoring in fine art of photography, he graduated in 1991.

Photography is not just a way of expressing his most inner soul but also creating a window to the world where through his pictures the unseen and the unspoken can be grasped. Driven by the desire to explore the mystical beauty of nature, he develops his sense and sensibility through the elements of fine art photography. His freedom of expression is more reflected in the elaboration and exploration of black and white.

Photography can never be separated from the aspects of making the common things unusual, welcoming the unexpected, indulging and embracing ourselves with the joy of photography as well as believing that anything is possible.

Hengki now lives in Jakarta, Indonesia with his wife and three children.

 

Official page: http://www.koentjoro.com/

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Black and white | Fine art photographer: Wei Chuan Liu

Black and white | Fine art photographer: Wei Chuan Liu | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Weichuan Liu is a Chinese photographer whose photos are absolutely gorgeous. He perfectly captures with his camera Panasonic DMC-LX3 the atmosphere of the environments around him. His portraits have a real charm too. Most of his photos are in black and white, so our selection focus on these.

 

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To photograph through the wall of the Franklin Tower | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

To photograph through the wall of the Franklin Tower | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"17th Floor, Flanklin Tower, La Defense. With E-TTL radio triggers, it is possible to set the slave flash regardless of master flash placement . Even better, it overcomes the obstacles to a maximum distance of 15 meters. Since I purchased these toys, I experience fanciful shots to measure its potential. I decided, then, to photograph a consultant through the wall of Franklin Tower."

(Serge Bouvet, photographer, Paris)

 

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Burma | Monica Denevan Photography

Burma | Monica Denevan Photography | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I'm glad to have found Monica Denevan's website with its gorgeous photographs of Burma. You will find that her some 120 photographs are indeed luminous and gorgeous.

Monica travels with her medium format Bronica, one lens, and a bunch of plastic bags filled with Ilford Delta 400 film. Her photographs are printed from negatives in her traditional darkroom and selenium toned.

Monica Denevan was Born in San Francisco. She Monica studied photography at San Francisco State University. She started visiting parts of Burma and China for many years, and always had her Bronica along. Her work was published in ZYZZYVA, Communication Arts Photo Annual, SHOTS, Black and White Magazine, The Photo Review, The Sun, and Artvas-The Photo (Korea) among others. 


She is represented by Scott Nichols Gallery in San Francisco, Duncan Miller Gallery in Santa Monica, Capital Culture Gallery in London, and Tao Evolution Gallery in Hong Kong which produced a small catalogue of her work. Monica’s photographs are in the permanent collection of UCSF Medical Center.

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Mental illness | Photographer: Lauren Simonutti

Mental illness | Photographer: Lauren Simonutti | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Lauren E. Simonutti, 1968, USA, passed away last week due to complications from her illness. On March 28th, 2006 she started hearing voices and was diagnosed with "rapid cycling, mixed state bipolar with schizoaffective disorder". She felt she was going mad and spent her last years almost in isolation. She turned the camera on herself and the space she was living in. She has left us with an impressive, honest and strong body of work. With her photographs she gave a voice to those that suffer in isolation.

 

Mental illness is not something easily understood. Most of us only hear about it through television or the cinema, which tends to sensationalize the condition. Rarely do we meet a person truly afflicted with mental illness who can explain it. In 2006, Lauren E. Simonutti started hearing three distinct voices in her right ear, the ear she lost hearing in years prior. After numerous hospitalizations and mis-diagnoses, Lauren was finally given a name to her illness, rapid cycling, mixed state bipolar with schizoaffective disorder, and given proper medicines which allows her to function with great clarity on a daily basis. 

Taking pictures since she was twelve, Lauren turned the camera on herself, photographing within the confines of her home, which she has rarely left since 2006. The result of this self-imposed isolation is a haunting, honest body of work about mental illness and a testament to her resilience and need to confront and understand her condition.

 

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Le village d’Abhaneri | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Le village d’Abhaneri | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Abhaneri the village is close to the city of Jaipur. It is a visual treasure. I pressed the green countryside and I discovered a village sparsely populated, without tourists without cars but very rich in architectural history. This village was for me, a true cultural recreation, a haven of peace where I stayed for a whole day.

Photo report's insight:

FRENCH: Le village Abhaneri, près du fort d'Amber, se situe à 20 minutes de voitures de la ville de Jaipur. C'est un véritable trésor visuel. Je voulais fuir le Fort d'Amber qui était bondé de touristes américains et français qui montaient sur les éléphants pour 400 roupies. Je me suis enfoncé dans la campagne verdoyante, et, surprise des surprises, je suis tombé sur un village peu peuplé, sans touristes, sans voitures mais très riche en histoire architecturale. Ce village a été pour moi, une véritable récréation culturelle, un havre de paix où je suis resté une journée entière.

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Banger rules | Photographer: Thomas Vanden Driessche

Banger rules | Photographer: Thomas Vanden Driessche | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

La “Full Destruction”, c’est l’apothéose d’une journée de course de Bangers ou pendant plusieurs heures des pilotes amateurs se feront peur en multipliant les tours de piste à tombeau ouvert et les contacts vigoureux avec leurs adversaires.

 

"Silence de mort pendant quelques secondes... Finalement, le bruit à nouveau. D’abord celui d’un véhicule en bout de course qui se remet en route, et puis dans un second temps, celui d’une foule en délire qui acclame son héro… Ben Hur des temps modernes… Le seul pilote à encore rouler entre une vingtaine d’épaves." - Thomas Vanden Driessche

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Фото и рисунки, арт и креативная реклама - Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet

Фото и рисунки, арт и креативная реклама - Fine art photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Фото и рисунки интересных людей, гламурные фото от лучших фотографов, красивые рисунки замечательных художников. Фанстастическо мышление, рисунки в стиле фентези, сказка, красивые иллюстрации. Профессиональны фото.

 

Twilight Tales

In Japan, I discovered the works of Lotte Reiniger. I saw some very good cartoons where the shadows made it very effectively evoking the posture of the protagonists and the plot was more striking narrated.

So I noted in my notebook December 5, 2006: “Shadow and narration. Photography”…

One day, I took my camera and I went down into the courtyard. My 5 year old girl looking for ladybugs and snails in the pile of dead leaves that lay along the shed. She wants to give me the benefit of each of these discoveries.

It is by chance seeing our shadow on the lawn that I remembered the work of Lotte Reiniger.

I came back at home to draw an animal on thick paper. The animal is a fawn paper which I drew the outline of a box that I put on a low wall. The photo was taken at dusk. The best time to photograph the shadows.- Serge Bouvet

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Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty

Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Horse racing is a part of Naadam, a Mongolian festival that has been celebrated since the times of Genghis Khan. It is most recently held every July to commemorate the People's Revolution. Traditionally, the jockeys are children in these races. It is said that Mongols learn to ride before they can walk and feel safer on horseback than on the ground. Boys and girls as young as five are used as jockeys because a Naadam race is not a test for riders, but for horses. However, the races can be very dangerous, with hundreds of horses running at great speeds across a steppe of 12 to 28 kilometers. In preparing for Naadam, children take part in repeated practice races and help the trainers take care of the racehorses. According to some estimates, 150 to 180 thousand horses with more than 30 thousand child jockeys compete in over 500 races each year.

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Rickshaw Wallahs | The Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy

Rickshaw Wallahs | The Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

" The government of Bengal had announced plans to completely ban the rickshaws, saying that the grueling work violates the pullers human rights, the argument was rejected by the rickshaw pullers with huge protests. Almost all of the pullers I spoke to were from the state of Bihar, one of India's poorest states. The rickshaws carry business people, live poultry, school children, the sick to the hospitals, fruit to the markets, and even prostitutes." - Tewfic El-Sawy

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Golden Eagle Nomads | Photographer: John Delaney

Golden Eagle Nomads | Photographer: John Delaney | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it


"Nobody knows exactly when the Kazakhs tamed the Golden Eagle of Central Asia. 
Herodotus refers to nomadic eagle hunters in 5th Century B.C. Marco Polo wrote about the Kazakhs in his epic “Travels” account. The name “Kazakh” dates as far back as the 13th century, meaning “independent”, “free” and “nomadic”. These terms perfectly define this legendary people, so famous for their pride and skills on the battlefield. Genghis Khan is said to have had over 5000 "eagle riders" in his personal guard. We do know that since the 15th Century, nomadic Kazakh tribes on horseback, with eagles alert at their sides, have roamed freely across the borders of what is today Russia, China, Kazakhstan and Western Mongolia. 

Now at the dawn of the 21st Century, the nomadic way of life is fragile and in danger of being eradicated. History has long threatened these legendary horsemen. The Bolshevik Revolution, Stalin's purges and China's cultural revolution drove the roaming Kazakhs to the mountains and valleys of Mongolia, where they have found refuge and the freedom to live as they have for centuries. But even now in this remote area globalization and the encroachment of the West may irreversibly change the eagle riders' way of life."


-John Delaney

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A Tale of Two Slums | Photographer: Stephen Dupont

A Tale of Two Slums | Photographer: Stephen Dupont | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

There are two excellent photographic essays of Polaroids made in the Mumbai slum Dharavi and the Senen slum of Jakarta by Stephen Dupont, an Australian photographer.

Dharavi is one of the world's largest slum and lies on prime real estate in the middle of India's financial capital, Mumbai and has a population estimated to be 1 million. Many businesses flourish in this slum, such as traditional pottery and textiles, a recycling industry, which generate an estimated $650 million turnover a year.

As for the Senen slum, it's a trackside slum in central Jakarta. It's also a center for recycling, and its inhabitants live cheek to jowl with the thundering trains.

  Stephen Dupont has produced a photographs of fragile cultures and marginalized peoples, which capture the human dignity of his subjects, and do so with great intimacy and often in some of the world’s most dangerous regions. His work has earned him prestigious prizes, including a Robert Capa Gold Medal citation from the Overseas Press Club of America; a Bayeux War Correspondent’s Prize; and first places in the World Press Photo, Pictures of the Year International, the Australian Walkleys, and Leica/CCP Documentary Award.

His work has been featured in The New Yorker, Aperture, Newsweek, Time, GQ, Esquire, French and German GEO, Le Figaro, Liberation, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Independent, The Guardian, The New York Times Magazine, Stern, The Australian Financial Review Magazine, and Vanity Fair.

He has held major exhibitions in London, Paris, New York, Sydney, Canberra, Tokyo, and Shanghai, and at Perpignan’s Visa Pour L’Image, China’s Ping Yao and Holland’s Noorderlicht festivals.


A Tale of Two Slums Part I: 

http://stephendupont.squarespace.com/essays/a-tale-of-two-slums-part-i

A Tale of Two Slums Part II:

http://stephendupont.squarespace.com/essays/a-tale-of-two-slums-part-ii

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Pooja Singh's comment, October 23, 2013 5:50 AM
Our homes and dreams are being taken away from us: Campa Cola Compound Story - The Facts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZsivIMNiOY Show your support by sharing the video and by signing a petition onhttp://bit.ly/savecampacola
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The Masai Typology | Travel photographer: Nicolas Lotsos

The Masai Typology | Travel photographer: Nicolas Lotsos | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
The Masai Typology is one of the many gorgeous photo galleries of Africa by photographer Nicolas Lotsos. I'm not much of an African wildlife aficionado, but his fine art galleries of photographs of the handsome Masai, of Zanzibar, or of the African slums and townships are lovely exemplars of monochromatic imagery. Nicolas Lotsos is  a fine art photographer (and in my view, a travel photographer as well) and a basketball agent. He co-runs a sports agency representing some of the top sports figures in Europe. He has been a photographer since he was 16 years old, and specializes in photographs of wild life and nature.

 

He also won an impressive number of awards, to include Gold Winner at the 2012 Grand Prix de la Photographie, Outstanding Achievement at the Spider Award 2012, the 2012 Veolia Wildlife Photographer Award, including two awards by the Travel Photographer Of The Year (TPOTY), amongst others.

A Nilotic group in East Africa, next to the Indian Ocean, the Masai society is patriarchal, and elder men decide most major matters for each group. A full body of oral law covers many aspects of behaviour. The Masai are monotheistic, worshipping a single deity.

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Bike kill | Photographer: Julie Glassberg

Bike kill | Photographer: Julie Glassberg | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Julie Glassberg on Photographing the Notorious and Unpredictable Black Label Bike Club

 

The Black Label Bike Club is known as the first “outlaw bicycle club.” It was created in 1992 by Jacob Houle and Per Hanson in Minneapolis, Minnesota and has chapters nationwide. They are one of the main contributors to the rise of tall bike culture and organized jousting competitions. This destructive, rebel culture revolves around the unlikeliest non-threatening object: the bicycle.

 

Based out of Brooklyn, Black Label represent a blend of punk, grunge and hippie culture. They are an independent community who sees themselves rebelling against the system. In a society that some feel pushes them to consume, focus on money and overly-use technology, this group of young people seems to be resisting and fighting against it. Their community is mainly based on the bike culture, art and on the real value of relationships.

 

They are a tight family, caring for each other, sharing meals, partying, or creating art together. Amidst an ongoing recession, and social pressures mounting, how does the young generation respond to it? Although they seem to be the carefree, self-destroying youth, they are quite aware of the situation today. As everyone, they love, hate, and also have their fears and concerns.

 

Julie Glassberg is a French born, award winning photographer currently living and working in New York. Her work is mainly based on the diversity of world cultures; subcultures; portraits; documentary projects. These images are from her series, Bike Kill, which documents the culture surrounding the Black Label Bike Club.

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Portraits of Patagonian Cowboys | Photographer: Mustafah Abdulaziz for National Geographic

Portraits of Patagonian Cowboys | Photographer: Mustafah Abdulaziz for National Geographic | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Mustafah Abdulaziz is a documentary photographer based in Berlin, Germany. He has been a member of the international photography collective MJR since 2008. This work is from his series, Patagonian Cowboys.

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Target Unknown | Photographer: Stacy Kranitz

Target Unknown | Photographer: Stacy Kranitz | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Once a year in Pennsylvania, 500 people come together to reenact the Battle of the Bulge. During the reenactment, I portray Leni Riefenstahl and behave with soldiers, as she would have. Rather than seek out a simple role model who fit a classic heroine profile, I became intrigued by the complex story of a woman I could both love and hate. In Riefenstahl, I found a multidimensional character with a focused vision and a murky set of morals. These grey areas spoke to my desire to understand people beyond the constraints of good versus evil. This experience allows me to reflect upon atrocity, delve into my own relationship with my Jewish heritage, and contemplate the camera's ability to re-imagine history. "

 

"I have inserted myself into the Nazi reenactor photographs in an effort to subvert the viewer’s instinct to dismiss these people as different from themselves. I believe that the grey areas between ethical imperatives may offer new potential to understand and relate to a subject.
Much of our conception of history is based on images. The reenactors base the authenticity of their looks on images and, in particular, on Riefenstahl’s film Triumph of the Will. Historical images have been filtered through media and propaganda. These images become history as generations pass, memories fade. Photographs and film become the dominant forces that shape the public imagination. My newly created images of the reenactment are part of the deconstruction process by which images first represent and then replace history."

(Stacy Kranitz : http://stacykranitzprojects.com/targetunknown)

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Artist Talk with Lauren E. Simonutti (2010)

In an attempt to understand why artists create the work they make, we decided to launch Artist Talk in September of 2008, a video series which allows the viewer to hear, from the artist, the reasons behind making each piece on exhibit.

 

In an attempt to understand why artists create the work they make, we decided to launch Artist Talk in September of 2008, a video series which allows the viewer to hear, from the artist, the reasons behind making each piece on exhibit.

This video was filmed during Lauren E. Simonutti's 2010 exhibition "8 Rooms, 7 Mirrors, 6 Clocks, 2 Minds & 199 Panes of Glass". The show page can be found here bit.ly/8UA3Bz

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