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Wonderful black and white photography
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Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet,

Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet, | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Où vont tous ces pauvres indiens chaque jour que fait Shiva ?
Ces miséreux au mauvais karma, que la faim autant que le travail maigrit ?
Où vont donc ces mioches qu’on voit errer seul avec un seau ou un bac de pierre sur la tête? Où vont donc ces femmes voilées dans leur saris rouges où survit encore un sourire.
Ils s’en vont tous bosser comme des forçats, comme des esclaves.
Ils vont, dès potron-minet répéter leurs mouvements en silence ou en chantonnant.
Accroupis sur la caillasse presque de braise, ils se préparent pour l'enfer.
Et la misère les mâche au soleil." - Serge Bouvet

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Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra

Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I first came to Kashmir in the early spring of 2007 at the end of a motorcycle trip across India and I fell in love with the people, the light, and the atmosphere of this remote place. But as much as I love it, the political situation of the valley continues to bring disorder and conflict. 

Currently there are two conflicts in Kashmir, and each is tightly woven into the other: The more known conflict is the international, atomically loaded border dispute between India and its archenemy, Pakistan, regarding the affiliation of Kashmir between the two states. The other, less known one, is the inner-Kashmiri conflict on the Indian side of the border (which is two- thirds of the complete territory), where the people struggle for independence from India.  I have spent the last two years documenting this conflict, most recently in the summer of 2009 when I spent two months on the Indian side.

I attended meetings of parents who have had children disappear without leaving a note or ever coming back. I was invited into homes where family members mourned the rape and murder of two young girls by paramilitary forces.  I photographed a family whose sons were shot during one of the countless demonstrations.  These experiences didn‘t differ from my last two trips to Kashmir - the political and social climate remained the same as it was when I left the region half a year prior. The slogans were also the same during the countless demonstrations against the Indian army, the symbol of the occupation of what the Kashmiris call their soil: “Ham ka chate? Azadi!"- "What do we want? Freedom!" 

Looking over the sixty-year history of this conflict, it seems highly unlikely that the people of Kashmir will gain independence in the foreseeable future and that the world will see an independent Kashmir again. This strategic region is too important for either nation to ever let it go.- Andy Spyra

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The Jangs | Photographer: Michael Jang

The Jangs | Photographer: Michael Jang | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

This time, I see intimate and hilarious shots of Michael's own extended family, taken in California in the 1970s while he was a student at Cal Arts. These pictures are far from your average family snapshots; in fact, they were just purchased by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 

Photo report's insight:

Michael Jang is an established photographer who has always had an eye for recognizing and capturing the defining moments of his generation. Well known for his commercial photography and portraiture of notable figures from the 70s and 80s, such as William Burroughs, Alice Walker, Jimi Hendrix, Frank Sinatra, and many others, Jang’s work is now being looked at in a new light. These photos can be found in Jang's book, Summer Weather, which was released last May from Owl & Tiger Books.

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What We Conjure | Photographer: Scott Alario

What We Conjure | Photographer: Scott Alario | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"We are on a search for the spiritually significant, the magic in every day. What will we find that’s worth passing down? What will we conjure?"—Scott Alario

Photo report's insight:

Photographer Scott Alario is based in Providence, Rhode Island. His seriesWhat We Conjure was made with an 8×10 view camera, and adds to the great lineage of photographers like Emmet Gowin and Nicholas Nixon who have documented those most dear to them. Alario explores his role as a father by making these pictures, occasionally appearing in them himself.

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CAPITOLIO | Photographer: Christopher Anderson

CAPITOLIO | Photographer: Christopher Anderson | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word ‘capitolio’ refers to the domed building that houses a government. Here, the city of Caracas, Venezuela, is itself a metaphorical capitolio building. The decaying Modernist architecture, with a jungle growing through the cracks, becomes the walls of this building and the violent streets become the corridors where the human drama plays itself out in what President Hugo Chavez called a ‘revolution.’

Originally published as a traditional book in 2010 by RM, “Capitolio” is an intimate journey through a time of revolution in Hugo Chavez’ Caracas, Venezuela. This series was photographed between 2004 and 2008.

 

Photo report's insight:

Christopher Anderson is a photographer and member of the Magnum Photos agency

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Ioan Tasi's comment, May 13, 2013 8:12 AM
wonderful.
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Casablanca medina | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Casablanca medina | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Casablanca medina is a labyrinth. When I was shooting the street, a young boy said in French, in a heavy Moroccan accent: "It's too dangerous to try to visit the medina alone; a foreigner like you found with this big camera might be stabbed or beaten."
Well, I met some great people inside this medina and I'm not dead... Hamdoullah!- Serge Bouvet

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War and Peace | Photographer: Melissa Cacciola

War and Peace | Photographer: Melissa Cacciola | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

War and Peace presents forty-eight tintype portraits of active duty military and veterans from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, and Marines as a kind of confessional before the camera. Fifteen men and nine women of various backgrounds, ages, and roles in the armed forces have been photographed in uniform and civilian attire in an exploration of war, identity, and what serving in the armed forces means.

 

These double portraits contrast each individual and his or her role in the military against his or her identity in a contemporary world that is constantly shifting culturally and politically. A chef, an infantry rifleman, an explosive ordinance device disabler, and a fuel carrier are just a few of the diverse individuals represented. Through the photographic lens, we can study just how the airman in his dress blues relates to the man in the Guns N’ Roses t-shirt. 


War and Peacemakes visible the present-day faces of those in service, a cross-section of our society that we may not often have the chance to see. Through the tintype, our humanity—epic and small—becomes transfixed by the intrinsic characteristics of one of the earliest photographic processes in our history.

Photo report's insight:

Tintype, also melainotype and ferrotype, is a photograph made by creating a direct positive on a sheet of iron metal that is blackened by painting, lacquering or enamelling and is used as a support for a collodion photographic emulsion. Photographers usually worked outside at fairs, carnivals etc. and as the support of the tintype (there is no actual tin used) is resilient and does not need drying, photographs can be produced only a few minutes after the picture is taken.

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Hijras, the third sex | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel

Hijras, the third sex | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Noisy and garish, an air of the notorious surrounds them as they walk through the streets. People shrink back when they pass. They are ridiculed and scorned, yet people are wary of incurring their wrath. They are stigmatized as social outcasts, yet fear of their curse inspires caution. For despite their humble status on the lowest rung of the Indian caste system, they wield a mighty cultic power- and in this they are worldwide unique.

 

They are creatures of the twilight, womanly souls in men's bodies, neither male nor female. According to Hindu mythology, they have the power to bless and to curse, to bestow fertility or deny it. They challenge the traditional dichotomy of gender - for they are the third sex. Their lives are full of contradictions, to which their demeanor testifies. Failing to conform to traditional gender roles, they are consigned to the difficult life of social outcasts. They are frequently the victims of discrimination, abuse and intimidation. Indian civil law recognizes only two sexes, and section 377 of the Indian Penal Code criminalizes all sexual acts that do not serve the purpose of procreation.

 

As members of a sexual minority, hijras - as they are commonly known in India - are denied the right to lead 'normal', independent lives. They are frequently subjected to raids, arrests and even rape by the police. Often rejected in childhood by families who feared losing their social standing, most hijras have not completed any formal education or training. They are largely denied 'normal' jobs. Hijras are not allowed to vote, to marry or to obtain a passport. They survive by soliciting 'donations' from business owners during Holi and Diwali - India's two most important religious festivals - or by blessing newlyweds and newborns with their dancing and singing for a fee. The alternative is prostitution.- Isabell Zipfel

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Ocean Spirits - Photographer: Wayne Levin

Ocean Spirits - Photographer: Wayne Levin | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Wayne Levin captures all things ocean—freedivers, surfers, whales, dolphins, seals, sharks, rays, and shipwrecks—and that’s just a short list of his exquisite subjects. Exploring the mysterious depths of the underwater world has been an ongoing passion for the Hawaii-based photographer for more than 20 years, and he has done so working with black-and-white, a detail that seems to enhance the beauty and secrets of the sea.

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Some kind of divine | Photographer: Ruth Kaplan

Some kind of divine | Photographer: Ruth Kaplan | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"These photographs were taken in Pentecostal, Baptist and other churches that are known for physical, movement-oriented ritual. I selected these groups as a metaphor for the aspect of all religions, which promise a fairy tale, and require surrender to the unknown from their practitioners; the human need for transcendence seems innate. Religion provides a construct in which people attempt to claim this experience. I felt it was important to try and photograph these intangible, elusive moments of personal surrender and what I perceive to be dangerous ideologies. At times I felt like taking a shower after hearing hateful ideas disguised as morality, yet at other times, I felt myself seduced by a service or a sermon. This project is an attempt to raise these contradictions and the questions that they pose."-Ruth Kaplan

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Kham Territory | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi

Kham Territory | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Kham is the name of the plateau located on the eastern third of Tibet. It is divided between the Chinese provinces of Yunnan, Sichuan and Qinghai (only the first two are represented in these photographs).  In spite of being historically and culturally united to Tibet’s central territory, Kham has various special characteristics such as the fighting spirit of its inhabitants.  The proportion of Tibetans varies in the region. There are fewer the more east you go towards China.  The majority are farmers and cattle breeders who leave trade and business in the hands of the Chinese.  Living together is not always easy between the two communities.- Mikel Aristregi

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The Disabled | Photojournalist: Ohm Phanphiroj

The Disabled | Photojournalist: Ohm Phanphiroj | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In Thailand, disabled individuals can be seen everywhere in the form of beggars, traveling the streets in Bangkok and asking for money. There are no laws intended to provide and improve the quality of life for these people. Roads, sidewalks, walkways are never equipped or adjusted to provide for wheelchairs or the blind. These unfortunate souls are considered a problem rather than as sharing in equal rights and status. They are looked down upon, although with a certain amount of sympathy. There are only a few facilities and organizations created to support and house them. Likewise, the budgets set aside for these places are minimal at best. Meager at worst.

 

The Disabled project is driven by the curiosity to understand how the disabled lives, functions and survives on a daily basis. In my search to learn more, I went to a male disabled rehabilitation and housing center on the outskirts of Bangkok. There the haunting and, at times, graphic images of an overburdened and failed care system can be seen. The place is both vastly under staffed and under budgeted, and the ratio of caregivers to patients is 1:40 or 50. Most of the patients living there have been abandoned by their families, not by choice but because their family has no means to take care of them, so subsequently they are brought to the center to be taken care of.

 

Patients are seen sleeping on the pavement out in the sun, tied to a secure pole or to a bed. The quality of the place is sub-standard, despite the good intentions of the few staffers who work there, with the condition of each patient varying, from physical to mental, to, in many cases, both.

It is my sincere desire to document the condition of the center along with the treatment of its patients. The images I have captured thus far are harrowing, haunting and very visceral. The feelings of loneliness and emptiness are prominent. I want to create a visual commentary that conveys these feelings along with the utter sense of despair and isolation I felt for the place and its patients.

 

With this project, I hope to help bridge the gap between those in need in our society and society itself. I wish to raise awareness and bring needed attention and better understanding of the existing conditions and to improve the quality of life for these people. I want to capture hope for the hopeless and dream for the few dreams the disabled have left. The project is my very personal and privileged journey into a space most do not care to venture, or simply refuse to acknowledge.- Ohm Phanphiroj

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Constance Jablonski for Vogue | Fashion photographer: Alexi Lubomirski

Constance Jablonski for Vogue | Fashion photographer: Alexi Lubomirski | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Alexi Lubomirski was born in England to a Peruvian mother and a Polish father. At the age of seven, he moved to Botswana with his mother and English stepfather. It was his stepfather who gave him his first camera at the age of 11. During his teenage years at school in Oxford, Lubomirski spent his free weekends doing odd jobs waitering, gardening and bartending to save up money for travel. His serious interest in photography developed whilst traveling in Peru during a gap year at college.

His interest later shifted from social commentary to narrative based, fashion photography during his studies at the University of Brighton, in the UK. It was shortly after finishing his studies that he was introduced to Mario Testino, with whom he assisted for the next 4 years whilst living between Paris and London. Towards the end of his time with Testino, Katie Grand approached Alexi to shoot for the FACE magazine, and later for Harpers Bazaar US.

Since then Lubomirski has become an established name within the fashion industry with an impressive client list, shooting for such publications as Harpers Bazaar US, Harpers Bazaar UK, German Vogue, Russian Vogue, Spanish Vogue, GQ USA, Chinese Vogue, Vogue Nippon, China Mens Vogue and Wonderland.

He has also become a firm favorite with celebrities, and has shot cover stars such as Charlize Theron, Gwyneth Paltrow, Natalie Portman, Jennifer Lopez, Jennifer Aniston, Julia Roberts, Nicole Kidman and Scarlett Johansson to name but a few. In 2008, Lubomirski had his first exhibition; TRANSIT, at MILK gallery in New York. A mixed media commentary on tv culture, comprised of pre conceived film stills.

He lives in New York with his wife and son.

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Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala

Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Democratic Republic of Congo has the dubious honour of holding two records. The first, paradoxically, comes from a natural blessing: it is the country on the African continent with the largest mineral wealth. But the gold, diamonds and Coltan (colombo-tantalite ore) have been and are an active part of the civil conflict in which Congo is submerged. The second is that it is the country with the largest number of victims from armed conflict since the Second World War. An estimated 4-5 million human beings have died because of the civil war since 1996.

 

The Rwanda genocide in 1994–which killed close to one million people, mostly Tutsis and moderate Hutus–created ideal conditions in the eastern Congo for horror, death and destruction. Since the end of the genocide, the Rwandan Tutsi troops have maintained an active role in the region: they organize and arm local pro-Tutsi guerrillas like the CNDP (French: Congrès National pour la Défense du Peuple) under the justification that Hutu militias...- Álvaro Ybarra Zavala 

 

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The July War | Photojournalist: Timothy Fadek

The July War | Photojournalist: Timothy Fadek | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

With the firestorm coming from the Rathergate crowd, and doubts now spreading from the left wingabout images from Lebanon, it can start to feel like all reason is being subsumed by political hysteria.  At the same time, war photojournalism seems at risk of being tarred with one brush.

I spent about a half-hour on the phone this evening with photojournalist and contributer Tim Fadek, who has been in Lebanon for about three weeks covering the war.

 

Having been present following the Qana air strike, Tim emphasized that there was no parading or manipulation of bodies, and that the scene was not staged in any way.  That said, Tim took pains to explain how this kind of situation carries with it certain cultural practices and emotional responses that don’t transfer well to the West.  This seems especially true right now, in the super-heated and intensely polarized political environment in the U.S.

"When there is senseless death in this part of the world," Tim explains, "it is completely normal to display the bodies.  Whether in plastic or on blankets, it’s done whether there are photographers there or not.  The idea is to ready the public for what has happened, and also say, look what our enemies have done to us."

 

Regarding the images cited as evidence of manipulation, Fadek said: "a finer distinction is being lost in the West.  In Qana, rescue workers did not hold up a baby to set up a shot.  They were not displaying them to the media, per se.  Yes, it was not lost on these men that the cameras presented a window to the world.  But these people were doing wrenching rescue work and they are human beings.  These instances [of holding up babies] were mostly spontaneous and momentary expressions of anger."

Tim also explained the circumstances surrounding his own images.  Although he felt the photo above was more powerful shown this way, he explained that a rescue worker did set down the body, briefly uncovering it for photographers to document.

For those inclined to consider the depictions as manipulated, Fadek also offers the following image, along with the circumstances involved.


Once removed from the collapsed building, these bodies were set on the ground to be taken down a hill.   From this spot to the waiting ambulances was at least a four minute walk.  In this case, the two children were placed on this blanket where photographers had 1 1/2 to to 2 seconds to document them.  Given the distance and the available manpower, the two bodies were placed on the same blanket to save effort.

In each case, Tim’s understanding was that the rescuers were acting in a manner reflecting a normal attitude toward the dead.  "It’s not a manipulation, it’s a cultural distinction," said Fadek.  "It’s the same as at a martyrs funeral, where faces are exposed, and the bodies marched through the streets.  It’s been done for years, media or otherwise."

Photo report's insight:

The July War : Timothy Fadek is an american photographer whose assignment work has been published in Time, Newsweek, The New York Times Magazine, Stern, Le Monde, National Geographic and scores of other publications.

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Anonymous | Photographer: Sofía López Mañan

Anonymous | Photographer: Sofía López Mañan | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In “Anonymous” I used stand-ins for self portraits and this allowed me to step outside of my self.

The nameless women silently speak for me. They become me in a universal sense. I think it might be easier to reveal our deeper truths anonymously. I am anonymously directing the emotional expression of universal characters. In essence these photographs are emotion portraits, and by stepping away from my individuality, I feel it invites the viewer to engage themselves in the mystery of their own truths, or to contemplate how the emotions depicted resonate in their own lives.

“Anonymous” was published in the last year in Al Limite Magazine, Eyemazing and Mono by Gomma Books.

 

 

Photo report's insight:

Sofía López Mañan was born in 1982 in Buenos Aires, Argentina. She has a B.A degree in fine arts by the Instituto Universitario Nacional de las Artes. She also studied advertising, photography and art direction in film.

In 2012 was awarded by Mono open call for emerging photographers and was also nominated to attend the Joops Master class. She also received in 2011 a scholarship to attend the Foundry Photojournalism Workshop and participated in Buenos Aires PhotoWorkshop.

Her work as been exhibit in Argentina, Spain and in various international art fairs.

She currently works as freelance photojournalist working in various national media and at the same time makes documentary projects independently.

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Maiko & Geiko | Photographer: Arif Iqball

Maiko & Geiko | Photographer: Arif Iqball | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Outside Japan there is often a misunderstanding about the role of the Geisha and that misunderstanding comes from different literary and movie interpretations/fictionalization by non-Japanese at different points in history. The difficulty also comes from the inability to recognize/accept that female entertainers can exist in cultures without engaging in any form of sexual entertainment.

 

The historical city of Kyoto, Japan is the true center of this floating world and home to five Kagai (literally flower towns, but specifically, performance districts) where you can see Geishas today. The oldest Kagai dates back to the fifteenth century and the tradition of the Geisha continues in Kyoto in the true manner and spirit as it has historically, where the women take pride in being “women of the mind” versus “women of the body”. By all local/Japanese definitions, these women are living art as well as the pinnacle of Japanese eloquence, good manners, style and elegance and are highly respected in Japanese society as artists. Some of their teachers have been labeled as “Living National Treasures” by the Japanese Government. The “Gei” of the Geisha itself means Art and “sha” means a person. Historically both men and women have been labeled Geisha although that word is seldom used and Geiko and Maiko (Apprentice Geiko) are the more appropriate forms of address.

 

There has been very little work done to photograph the artistic side of the Geiko and Maiko and my work is an effort to see them as living art and to be able to portray them in both formal and informal settings. Behind the painted face is really a teenager/young woman working very hard through song, dance, music, and witty conversation to make the customers of the tea houses escape from their world of stress to a world of art/humour/relaxation and laughter.

Most of this work was done in Medium Format to enable the viewer to eventually see and feel the larger photograph itself as art and I hope that this broader work can shed a new light to the understanding of the Maiko and Geiko and bring respect to them as artists from the non-Japanese viewer.

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Big Mama and Fukumaru the Cat | Photographer: Miyoko IHARA

Big Mama and Fukumaru the Cat  | Photographer: Miyoko IHARA | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Here’s a tale of friendship and love that will warm your heart and put a smile on your face.

 

In all started 12 years ago when Miyoko Ihara first started to take candid photographs of her grandmother Misa. She wanted to document Misa’s life, her routine, passion and hobbies to share with future generations.

One day Misa found a tiny kitten in one of her garden sheds – to this day nobody knows how the bi-colored kitten got there, but Misa lovingly gave her a home and the name ‘Fukumaru’ – a Japanese reference to good fortune and peace. 8 years on, Fukumaru is her loyal companion ever by her side (except when perched up high on a pole!) and keeping the 87-year-old company.

 

You can instantly feel the warmth, love, friendship and affection both Fukumaru and Misa have for one another from Miyoko’s exquisite  photographs. Both cat and owner suffer from poor hearing, but it matters little, as these images highlight – you don’t always need words to express how you feel.

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Exploitation of Child Labour | Photographer: Fernando Moleres

Exploitation of Child Labour | Photographer: Fernando  Moleres | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Across the world, millions of children do extremely hazardous work in harmful conditions, putting their health and lives at risk. Their education, personal and social development is compromised by long working. They live with their infancy stolen, without a minimum possibility to develop their potentialities or possibilities of choice. The worst forms of child labour must be eradicated just now and governments, international institutions must push in this direction.

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The coalfields of Jharia | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel

The coalfields of Jharia | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In Jharia, in the federal state of Jharkhand, around 600,000 people live in the middle of one of India's biggest coal mining areas. There's nothing in it for most of them. Quite the opposite: the soil, the water and the air are now contaminated, of all things in an area that was previously rich in woodland. 
The story of Jharia is the story of how the greed for profit, vested interests and the thirst for power have prevailed and led to one of the areas richest in minerals in India remaining so economically backward. For the mining marginalises the poor and deepens social inequality in the name of economic development, from which mostly only metropolises like Delhi, Bangalore and Mumbai profit. 


Shortly after 1971, the coal mines were nationalised. Since then, their operator is the BCCL (Bharat Coking Coal Limited) which thus controls one of the biggest coal deposits in India and one of the biggest in the whole of Asia. BCCL conducts mainly opencast mining. Mostly illegally, since in 97% of the cases no licence has been granted. Opencast mining is more profitable than deep mining. The productivity and extracted quantities are significantly higher than in deep mining and cost less. In Jharia, coal is mined in the villages, next to the houses, in short, on people's doorsteps. Even on the streets, on railway lines, in the station itself, which is not a station any more, coal is mined. 


Really, the mined area should be filled with sand and water afterwards, so it can be cultivated again. For cost reasons, however, this never happens, which leads to the coal seams coming into contact with oxygen and catching fire. India has the most coal blazes worldwide. BCCL representatives estimate there are 67 fires in Jharia alone.

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Transformations | Photographer: Mariette Pathy Allen

Transformations | Photographer: Mariette Pathy Allen | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

It was 1978 in New Orleans on the last day of Mardi Gras when photographer Mariette Pathy Allen happened upon a group of crossdressing men in a hotel—a chance encounter that would lead to a multi-decade exploration of the transgender community. Shot throughout the 1980s, Transformationscompiles portraits of crossdressers in their homes and with their loved ones in an attempt to offer society a different view of a group that had been quite mis-characterized at the time. Allen was a pioneering powerhouse at the inception of this work, which was published into a book in 1989. She has since continued to inspire gender consciousness with the publication of her second book, The Gender Frontier that compiles photographs, interviews, and essays exploring political activism and transgender youth. Allen has also been a valuable consultant to several films about gender and sexuality over the years.

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Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word "karoshi" came into common use around 1990, when Japanese workers began working longer hours in response to competition from overseas and the recession at the time. Despite increased awareness of the dangers of overwork, de-regulation and increased global competition means that Japanese workers are working harder than ever.


About 20 years ago, heart attacks or strokes were a symbol of ‘karoshi’ in Japan. Today, workers are committing suicide. Of the more than 30,000 suicides recorded 2009, 10,000 were believed to be related to work, according to data from the national police agency. Suicide triggered by overwork is particularly prevalent among white color workers, also known as “salarymen” in Japan. Salarymen devote long work hours and loyalty to companies in exchange for a life-time of employment and benefits.

 

With the recession of the 1990s and the lifting of a ban on the use of cheap temporary laborers, salarymen increasingly work longer hours because of a shortage of manpower and the fear of losing jobs.

Photo report's insight:

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.
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Benedyct Antifer's curator insight, March 26, 2013 12:39 PM

Travail impressionnant sur une société qui aliène de plus en plus la seule richesse dont elle dispose : les gens qui la compose...

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Fighting for a voice | Photojournalist: Bob Miller

Fighting for a voice | Photojournalist: Bob Miller | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In April 2010, United States ambassador Michael Ranneberger called on the young people of Kenya to seize active roles in the reform of their nation. After moving around the country interacting with young people, the envoy said he sensed “a sea change of attitude” among youths,“a tidal wave below the surface. The youth have woken up.” 

 

Less than three years earlier, post-election violence surrounding the rigged presidential elections left 1,200 dead and 600,000 displaced in Kenya. Yet, over the last two years, various grassroots initiatives led by youth have begun to improve quality of life for those in the direst of conditions. Termed “youth groups” on the streets, these initiatives could represent the future of long-term socioeconomic development in Kenya, and its neighboring countries. Members of the Usafi Youth Group in Kibera dig pit latrines to remove waste mounds in the slum, covering the newly fertilized earth with sustainable agriculture projects.

 

Other groups are building community bath houses in the poorest of areas, and organizing meetings to educate the community on the risk of HIV/AIDS. Within this progressive youth culture is the Kibera Olympic Boxing Club, a group of low-income adolescents from the slum who use sport to stay off the street and involved in the community. These youth are a microcosm of the greater movement toward reform, and a generation fighting for a voice.- Bob Miller

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Bob Miller is photographer, filmmaker and multimedia storyteller based in Alabama.

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PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto

PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Article 18 of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Cambodia: “the state will protect the rights of children, particularly the right to life, education, and protection during times of war, in addition to protection against economic and sexual exploitation”.

At present Cambodia has around 14 million inhabitants, a number which has increased favourably in recent years due to the period of relative peace the country has experienced since 1993.  Depending on the time of year, the capital, Phnom Penh, has between two and three million inhabitants.

In a country where 81% of the population gain their livelihood from agriculture, the climate determines everything.  However, the extreme poverty in rural areas, the non-existence of technological farming, climatic instability, etc., are all factors which force the population to emigrate to the city in hope of finding a better life.  Unfortunately, what usually happens in these cases is that life does not become better, but the complete opposite.  Due to the parents’ inability to look after all the family members, Cambodian boys and girls have the tendency to start fending for themselves from a very early age.

 

 In the capital, approximately half the children and teenagers who look after themselves have arrived alone from surrounding provinces, with only a few coins in their pockets.  Some of the children will return to their villages after a few days, weeks, or even months.  Others will spend so long on the street that it becomes impossible to return, simply because they forget who they are and where they come from.  At their roots there is always a completely unstructured family unit, in most cases because of extreme poverty, AIDS, or alcoholism which almost always transforms into domestic violence.

Organised into small groups, the bonds that the children build amongst themselves are strong, deep and sincere; as primitive as the survival instinct itself.  Malnutrition, illness, drug abuse, sexual harassment from tourists, traffic…these are all daily threats that the children face.  Perhaps, above all of those, the lack of affection from society, the feeling of abandonment and the shortage of self-confidence could be seen as the strongest and most pressing threat of all.  Forgotten by their politicians who are immersed in dismantling their country in the shortest possible time, at the moment the only valid option the children have to leave the street is to go through an NGO.  This, however, will never be the solution to the problem.

 

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Another link of photo documentary: http://www.fotovisura.com/user/MikeA/view/rue-24-phnom-penh-kampuchea

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Recall | Photographer: Anastasia Bogomolova

Recall | Photographer:  Anastasia Bogomolova | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

For the past four years Russian photographer Anastasia Bogomolova has been studying the story of her family via photographs. She digs through countless old images, calling upon family members to recount events and moments from the past.

Recall is the young photographer’s exploration of identity, memory and time through imagery. Inspired to unveil the history of her kin through fragmented memories, Bogomolova also notes that sometimes we are the ones who have to finish writing our family stories. Recall reminds us of the power a photograph can hold—the story it tells and simultaneously leaves out.

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