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BLACK AND WHITE
Wonderful black and white photography
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Shadows In Greece | Photojournalist: ENRI CANAJ

Shadows In Greece | Photojournalist: ENRI CANAJ | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The centre of Athens, as I first remember it, was full of life. During the period before the Olympic Games, there was great development. New hotels appeared in order to host the visitors, shops, restaurants and cafes kept sprouting out, it was full of people everywhere. All this happened within a few years. It was as if the city put on new clothes. During the days of the Olympics, the city was clean and well-guarded. You would not see street-merchants, drug-addicts or immigrants, just tourists and people who came in order to have a good time. In my eyes, it looked like another place. As time passed, the city started deteriorating and gradually recovered its previous character. Time passes fast.

 

The city is now fading. Some people abandon it due to the crisis. Many shops and hotels have shut down,  the centre is now almost deserted. People fear they will get ripped-off, they hear that this happens all the time.They even fear seeing all the poverty and destitution, they drug-users who will rip you off for their shot, the women prostituting themselves. But for me, those people were always there. I found them all there when I first arrived as a 9-year old child. They were always there when I was growing up. They are somehow trapped in their lives.  The immigrants live in small rooms that they rent, many of them together, without much hope.

 

The women prostitute themselves even in the streets for 5€. Yet, hanging around with them has been my daily routine. This way, it was easier to approach them. They are sensitive people with a lot of problems, with ruined families behind them. Sometimes they give the impression that no one has cared for them. As if they want someone to talk to, as if they want to get out of the misery they are in. For some of them I had the sense that they were almost looking for someone to open up to and take it all out. Like confessing. What made an impression on me was that they often opened up and talked as if they knew me. I would only shoot when I sensed that they were more comfortable, after some time had passed. The images I have selected are stronger for me, because I know the story behind them. - 

ENRI CANAJ

Photo report's insight:

Photographer Enri Canaj documents the heart-wrenching decline of a once-prosperous city in his series 'Shadows of Greece.' Plagued by poverty, crime, sex trafficking and the political protests of fascist and anti-fascist groups, Athens no longer offers its citizens a safe environment. Canaj, who migrated to Athens at age 11, takes a special interest in the city's immigrant populace and the agonizing conditions and treatment they are subject to.

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Ten Thousand Scrolls | Photographer: Kirk Crippens

Ten Thousand Scrolls | Photographer: Kirk Crippens | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
“Traveling ten thousand miles is better than reading ten thousand scrolls” is a Chinese proverb that speaks to the heart of Kirk Crippens’ recent portrait project. He was hungry for knowledge of China that he couldn’t get just by reading, so he traveled from his home in the East Bay area to the small city Chinese city of Lishui. With just two words of Mandarin (Ni hao, which means “hello”), he managed to meet hundreds of people who allowed him to photograph them and who took him into their homes and into their confidence. Crippens is one of three photographers (along with Maggie Preston and David Wolf) participating in the 2012 RayKo artists-in-residence program. A joint exhibition is currently on view at the RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco through December 14th, 2012.
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Wanawake | Photographer: Martina BACIGALUPO

Wanawake | Photographer: Martina BACIGALUPO | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Every minute in the world a woman dies of childbirth. 99% of these women live in developing countries. More than half of them live in sub-Saharan Africa. For every maternal death, 20 women suffer pregnancy-related injuries, infections or diseases and, in some case, long term disabilities. The majority of maternal deaths and disabilities can be prevented through access to basic health-care services during pregnancy and delivery.

The more affected are women living in poverty, who lack the decision-making power and the financial resources to access basic health care.
The lack of progress in reducing maternal mortality highlights the low price placed on the lives of these women and testifies to their limited public voice.
In the urban western world a woman reaches a hospital in less than 7 minutes. In the Congo women who manage to reach a health center have walked, pregnant and alone for hours, often for days." - Martina Bacigalupo

Photo report's insight:

Martina Bacigalupo was born in 1978 in Genova.

She is member of Agence Vu in Paris.

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Zahida's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:10 PM

This article interests me because of the major differeances in the avaerage time it takes for women to get to the hospital when they become pregnent. In the urban western world a women gets to the hospital while in the Congo, women get to the hospital after walking for hours or even days. Many people want to help in a specific way want to donate to a cause that they know that they can directly impact people.  The half the sky book concentrates on specific examples, while this article concentrates on one aspect of the overall goal that the Half the Sky book is trying to promote. 

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The 2006 Lebanon War | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

The 2006 Lebanon War | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Samuel Aranda Phototographer
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"The 2006 Lebanon War – know in Lebanon as the July War, and in Israel as the Second Lebanon War – was a 34-day military conflict un Lebanon and norther Israel between Israel and Hezbollah.

The conflict left hundreds of dead and thousands of displaced. Whole families lost everything during the war." - Samuel Aranda

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Médina de Casablanca | Photographe Serge Bouvet

Médina de Casablanca | Photographe Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

La découverte de la soirée est encore une fois le travail photographique de Serge Bouvet. Ses reportages sont un délice pour les yeux, un apaisement de l’esprit et des sens puisque son regard vierge nous fait découvrir ces lieux que l’on a tendance à prendre pour du banal. C’est pour cette raison que l’on doit toujours changer de lieux, aller dans des endroits nouveaux à la fois sur le plan photographique que sur le plan des lumières. Serge Bouvet nous amène dans la médina de Casablanca avec un reportage en Noir/Blanc bien cisaillé. Imprégnez vous de ce travail et surtout bonne découverte.

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Industrious | Photographer: Marco Grob

Industrious | Photographer: Marco Grob | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

For its 100th anniversary the construction company Holcim has commissioned a unique artistic memento. Star photographer Marco Grob was invited to photograph the company's workers. The result is a stunning homage to 80,000 employees in 70 countries. With his sensitive yet direct portraits, Marco Grob captures the face of the company. The resulting series of black-and-white photography has great resonance and pays fitting tribute to the New Objective tradition of August Sander and Albert Renger-Patzsch.

Photo report's insight:

Born in Olten, Switzerland, Marco Grob began his career 
as a photographer's assistant in Los Angeles. Upon his return to Switzerland, Marco opened his first studio and worked for twenty years as a still life photographer.

 

 

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Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres

Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Fernando Moleres was born in Bilbao, Spain in 1963. He began work as a nurse in his home village, traveling in 1987 to pursue that calling in Nicaragua, during the Sandinista period. It was there that Moleres began to appreciate the value of photography and to teach himself how to do it. During the early 1990s, he combined nursing work with long periods traveling and doing photo projects, such as Children at Work, which lasted several years and took him to many countries. His photos have appeared in a number of international publications, such as Stern, Le Figaro Magazine, Le Monde 2, La Republica, Io Donna, The Independent and The Sunday Times Magazine. Moleres has published two books and has had more than 20 solo exhibitions worldwide. His honors include a Picture of the Year 2011, two previous World Press Photo prizes (in 2008 and 1998), a W. Eugene Smith Grant, a Erna and Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant, and a Lucia Award 2012 Deeper Perspectives Award, among others. Moleres is now based in Barcelona.

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One of the most touching images in history | Photojournalist: Joe O'Donnell

One of the most touching images in history | Photojournalist: Joe O'Donnell | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Stoic Japanese Orphan, Standing At Attention Having Brought His Dead Younger Brother To A Cremation Pyre, Nagasaki, By American Photographer, Joe O’Donnell 1945"

 

Although his name is unknown, we know a lot about him. The child was about 10 years old and survived the crash. Unfortunately, as a result of an air raid killed all his loved ones. Orphaned boy, survived along with his younger brother, which he wore tied back. The child had bowed his head and seemed to be very strongly sleep. His older brother, erect, without shoes and with a straight face, he came to the vicinity of the funeral pile on which the corpses were burned victims.

 

He stood there a few minutes, when finally went to him the man in the white mask, which is responsible for burning the bodies. The silence began to take off attached to the back of the boy child. He grabbed them by the arms and legs and put on the stack. Boy's little brother was already dead.

 

That direction by a photo of Joe O'Donnell's situation, a photographer working for the U.S. Marines. When in 1945 he was sent to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by documenting the bombing and the U.S. occupation, he was only 23 years old. The air raid destroyed cities nearby spent up to 6 months. Those events permanently etched in his memory.

 

O'Donnell saw the whole situation and observed the behavior of the boy who brought his brother to burn his body. When the child was buried at the stake, the boy stood still and watched the flames. His face remained impassive, but you could see that little hero biting his lower lip so hard that it started to bleed. Then he turned and walked away in silence.

Photo report's insight:

Joseph (Joe) Roger O'Donnell (May 7, 1922 – August 9, 2007) was an American documentarian, photojournalist and a photographer for the United States Information Agency. Born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, his most famous work was documenting photographically the immediate aftermath of the atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945 and 1946 as a Marine photographer. He died in Nashville, Tennessee.

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Karczeby | photographer: Adam Pańczuk

Karczeby | photographer: Adam Pańczuk | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Karczebs
In one of the dialects spoken in the east of Poland, which is a mixture of Polish and Belorussian, people strongly attached to the soil they had been cultivating for generetations were called "Karczebs". With their bare hands Karczebs cleared forests in order to grow crops. The word Karczeb was also used to describe what remains after a tree is cut down - a trunk with roots, which remains stuck in the ground. This also applied to people - it was not easy for the authorities to root them out from their land, even in the Stalinism times. The price they paid for their attachment to their soil was often their freedom or life. After death, hurried nearby their farmland, a Karczeb himself became the soil, later cultivated by his descendants.

Photo report's insight:

In Karczeby, Warsaw-based photographer Adam Panczuk captures intimate portraits of Polish farmers and their connection and respect for the land they cultivate. Deeply rooted, steady and still, these are a people with the land in their blood and bones, defined by a livelihood built in nature.

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Under the skin | Photographer: Maciej Pisuk

Under the skin | Photographer: Maciej Pisuk | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The inhabitants of Warsaw consider Brzeska Street, the very core of North Praga, the most neglected and dangerous district in the city (in my opinion the greatest local problem is stigmatization of the people living in the area). I would like to present you portraits of the street’s residents, my neighbors, acquaintances, friends, people among whom I lived for so many years. The pictures taken in this place constitute the vast majority of my photographic work so far.
I only photograph people who I stay in close touch with. The pictures are a result of the long process where the release of the shutter is essentially an element of little meaning.

 

The protagonists of my photographs possess something unusual: they have faces. I could risk and state that today almost nobody shows their face and there are only a few people who still have them. The face disappears under layers of masks, which are adjusted to the roles that we are forced to play. We change our masks as easily as we change our identities. In public, we only present the image that we shape according to our needs. Our contacts stop being direct. Sometimes we communicate with each other but we are not able to encounter. I like thinking of my pictures as testimonies of the encounters and I count on them to convey a particle of the experience I took part in.

Photo report's insight:

A graduate of the screenwriting course at the State Academy of Film, TV and Theatre in Lodz. Works as a screenwriter. The winner of prizes and awards on Polish and international photography competitions, among others: 2nd Prize at BZ WBK Press Foto 2006 (category: society), 1st Prize at ‘Warsaw Autumn of Photography’ 2007, 1st prize in the category of Photojournalism Non-Pro-People/Personality at PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris 2008 Photo Competition, 2nd prize at BZ WBK Press Foto 2010 (category: portrait), Stockholm Photography Week 2012 – The prize for the best portfolio.
For a few years he has been working on a photographical documentary project concerning the inhabitants of the area of Praga in Warsaw.

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Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda

Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Arab al-Jahalin is the biggest bedouin community that lives in the West Bank Area called E-1, part of the Area C, where Israel retains control over security as well as planning and zoning, and holds strategic significance for further expansion of illegal Israeli settlements.


The bedouins live in miserable shacks, without electricity or running water, grazing their sheeps between debris and dreaming of the flourishing desert of Beersheva, where they have been forcefully evicted, across the 1949 armistice lines by Israeli authorities. In the last 15 years the Bedouin communities have been subject to demolition, requisition of cattle, attacks by settlers, aimed to get away from the area.


But despite this, the communities have shown determination and unbelievable resilience, who led the Israeli military authorities to draw up a "plan of relocation" which ignore the aspirations, needs, traditions and the system of relations inherent in the Bedouin culture. The plan provides the deportation and a forced establishment of the Jahalin tribe next to the rubbish dump of Abu Dis. - Giuliano Camarda

Photo report's insight:

Giuliano Camarda is a freelance photographer since 2008.
He has worked in Bosnia Herzegovina developing several issues about the war aftermath. Actually he's working in the Occupied Palestinian Territories on a long term project. Mainly focused on projects with social and humanitarian aspects. He collaborated with NGOs such as CESVI, Caritas Italiana, La Carovana del sorriso, Vento di Terra. His works have been published on National Geographic Italia, Repubblica.it, Sky TG24, Foreign Policy, ABC News, Donna Moderna, Witness Journal,

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Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet,

Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet, | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Où vont tous ces pauvres indiens chaque jour que fait Shiva ?
Ces miséreux au mauvais karma, que la faim autant que le travail maigrit ?
Où vont donc ces mioches qu’on voit errer seul avec un seau ou un bac de pierre sur la tête? Où vont donc ces femmes voilées dans leur saris rouges où survit encore un sourire.
Ils s’en vont tous bosser comme des forçats, comme des esclaves.
Ils vont, dès potron-minet répéter leurs mouvements en silence ou en chantonnant.
Accroupis sur la caillasse presque de braise, ils se préparent pour l'enfer.
Et la misère les mâche au soleil." - Serge Bouvet

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Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra

Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I first came to Kashmir in the early spring of 2007 at the end of a motorcycle trip across India and I fell in love with the people, the light, and the atmosphere of this remote place. But as much as I love it, the political situation of the valley continues to bring disorder and conflict. 

Currently there are two conflicts in Kashmir, and each is tightly woven into the other: The more known conflict is the international, atomically loaded border dispute between India and its archenemy, Pakistan, regarding the affiliation of Kashmir between the two states. The other, less known one, is the inner-Kashmiri conflict on the Indian side of the border (which is two- thirds of the complete territory), where the people struggle for independence from India.  I have spent the last two years documenting this conflict, most recently in the summer of 2009 when I spent two months on the Indian side.

I attended meetings of parents who have had children disappear without leaving a note or ever coming back. I was invited into homes where family members mourned the rape and murder of two young girls by paramilitary forces.  I photographed a family whose sons were shot during one of the countless demonstrations.  These experiences didn‘t differ from my last two trips to Kashmir - the political and social climate remained the same as it was when I left the region half a year prior. The slogans were also the same during the countless demonstrations against the Indian army, the symbol of the occupation of what the Kashmiris call their soil: “Ham ka chate? Azadi!"- "What do we want? Freedom!" 

Looking over the sixty-year history of this conflict, it seems highly unlikely that the people of Kashmir will gain independence in the foreseeable future and that the world will see an independent Kashmir again. This strategic region is too important for either nation to ever let it go.- Andy Spyra

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I See A Darkness | Photojournalist: Matt Lutton

I See A Darkness  | Photojournalist: Matt Lutton | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

 “As soon as you appeared on this roof you made yourself ridiculous. It was your tone of voice. You spoke your words as though you denied the very existence of the shadows or of evil. Think, now: where would your good be if there were no evil and what would the world look like without shadow? Shadows are thrown by people and things. There’s the shadow of my sword, for instance. But shadows are also cast by trees and living things. Do you want to strip the whole globe by removing every tree and every creature to satisfy your fantasy of a bare world? You’re stupid.” - Mikhail Bulgakov for Matt lutton

Photo report's insight:

Lutton has lived and worked in Serbia since 2009, documenting the complex climate of a country that he says is still “emerging from the hangover of the 1990s, where atrocities were carried out in their name just across newborn borders, and constructive reflection about the consequences of those years is long over due.” As a documentary photographer, the image is everything—it unveils the nuanced stories that wait to be told,

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Mutazioni | Fine art photographer: Gian Luca Groppi

Mutazioni | Fine art photographer: Gian Luca Groppi | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Gian Luca Groppi is a modern storyteller, who mixes cards and genres, giving his works a caustic lyricism that deliberately does not offer solutions or panaceas, but is rather an attempt at trying to shake us from widespread social and emotional inertia.” And here he is again the "storyteller", who brings together in this exhibition years of works that he himself calls "his only children." 

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BREATH | Fine art photographer: Tomohide Ikeya

BREATH | Fine art photographer: Tomohide Ikeya | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"BREATH

I only became aware of the existence of life and death after connecting deeply to the world of water. This happened long before I started photography: by chance, I was invited to go diving, and when I saw that underwater world it captured me at once. The various phenomena and life forms which exist only in the water and the beautiful play of water and light brought me a strong sense of elation and excitement. 

 

In that world, it is difficult to walk as you would on the ground, and weather conditions can sometimes prevent you from entering it at all. Training and careful preparation are necessary. 

 

Above all, though, there is a limit to the number of breaths you can take. Among the many restrictions that exist in this world, this work focuses on “BREATH,” the most essential factor. Breathing is indispensable to us; it repeats continually during our life, and we consider death to be the point at which breathing stops. Usually, breath is invisible, and I think it never registers in our consciousness.

 

By separating ourselves from this phenomenon, which is so close to our own lives, we can consider its essence and value. 

 

This occurs in the water. When we are covered in water—a kind of death—the fear inside of us comes to the surface. Beyond this, the condition of not being able to breathe reveals our attachment to life. I capture this entirely unpredictable scene of struggle.

 

 

I superimpose this highly restrictive scene onto human “life.” People encounter all kinds of troubles during their lives. Even if someone knocks down a barrier preventing them from doing something with their own hands, this will not change the fundamental essence of our own limitations. It is necessary to live together with such difficulty.

 

Perhaps the essence of life, granted to everyone, is to live while struggling against death. Math or science can’t change this. Life is not just about visible beauty, but also about true strength, which we have from birth."- Tomohide Ikeya

 
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Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"The Narmada River project created by the Indian Government involves the construction of 30 large, 135 medium and 3000 small dams to harness the waters of the Narmada river and its tributaries. The proponents of the dam claim that this plan would provide large amounts of water and electricity which are required for development purposes. Opponent of the dam question the basic assumptions of the Narmada Valley Development Plan and believe that its plan is unjust and inequitable…" - Samuel Aranda

Photo report's insight:

Aranda began to work as a photographer for newspapers El País and El Periódico de Catalunya at the age of 19. Two years later he traveled to the Middle East, where he covered the Israeli–Palestinian conflict for the Spanish news agency EFE.

In 2004 Aranda begun working for AFP, covering stories in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The photojournalist association ANIGP-TV awarded Arandas feature documentary about African immigrants trying to reach Europe with the Spanish National Award of Photography. Since 2006 he is working as a freelance photojournalist.

In 2011 Aranda covered the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen. In February 2012 he was awarded the World Press Photo of the Year 2011. The winning picture shows an a woman embracing her son, wounded during clashes against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen, part of the Arab Spring.

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A Shadow Remains | Photos by Phillip Toledano and Maggie Steber

A Shadow Remains |  Photos by Phillip Toledano and Maggie Steber | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

 Maggie Steber Phillip Toledano and Maggie Steber turned their cameras on themselves and the ones closest to them at a time of deep introspection...

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South Sudan | Photographer: Marco Crob

South Sudan | Photographer: Marco Crob | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

United Nations, 5 April 2013 - After decades of war South Sudan is contaminated with thousands of deadly unexploded bombs and landmines. These explosives threaten the lives and livelihoods of South Sudan's inhabitants, and are still an impediment to development, peace and stability. Emmy award-winning photographer Marco Grob travels to South Sudan to photograph the Mundari tribesmen as they roam vast plains in search of grazing land for their cattle. Here is an inside look into the creation of these stunning photographs.

Photo report's insight:

 

Award-winning photographer Marco Grob is making his mark in advertising and editorial circles with his high-impact fashion and portrait imagery. To satisfy his high-end commercial clients—Adidas, Tag Heuer, BBC, ARD, UBS, Nike, and Louis Vuitton—and editorial clients—GQ, Vanity Fair, Marie Claire, Elle, Vogue, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, and Zeit Magazin—New York-based, Swiss-born Grob has relied on Hasselblad equipment exclusively throughout his career.

 
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Qajar | Photographer: Shadi Ghadirian

Qajar | Photographer: Shadi Ghadirian | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Her Qajar Series (1998-2001) consists of small studio portraits of women dressed in the nineteenth-century Qajar style. Many of the women photographed are Ghadirian's friends and family. The backgrounds of these portraits resemble those found in photographic studios of that period. However, the artist has added some modern anomalies or dissonances, such as a mountain bike, a newspaper, or a Pepsi-Cola can. Ghadirian plays with these juxtapositions and contrasts, thus expressing the difficulties women face in Iran today - torn between tradition and the modernity of globalization. These composed portraits depict women unsure to which era they belong.

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Autorickshaw | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Autorickshaw | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Autorickshaws are common all over India, and provide cheap and efficient transportation. New auto rickshaws run on CNG and are environmentally friendly. Autorickshaws are found in cities, villages and in the countryside.


There are two types of autorickshaws in India. In older versions the engines were situated below driver's seat. In newer versions engines are in rear portion. They normally run on petrol, CNG and diesel. The seating capacity of a normal rickshaw is 4, including driver. 

There are also six-seater rickshaws in parts of Maharashtra. In cities and towns across India it is the backbone of city transport. Normally their fare rates are controlled by the government with traffic meters.

CNG autos were distinguishable from the erstwhile petrol-powered autos by having a green and yellow livery as opposed to the earlier black and yellow. Certain local governments are pushing for four-stroke engines instead of the current two-stroke versions.

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Comment rendre une photo poétique | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Comment rendre une photo poétique | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Concernant le traiment de la couleur ou du noir et blanc, voilà une photo qui m'a posée problème au départ. Pour cette photo-ci, l'ensemble des lignes verticales, de la forme triangulaire des deux sujets, les rectangles constitués par la grille, le panneau publicitaire  JCDecaux et le bâtiment lui-même aurait perdu de leur potentialité poétique si la photo avait été en couleur. En outre, le traitement noir et blanc accentue l'intemporalité et l'irréalité de l'image, ou tout au moins une certaine ambiguïté qui ne m'est pas déplaisante. Et l’ambiguïté d'une photographie n'en constitue-il pas le principal atout esthétique?

Photo report's insight:

En poésie, en chanson, en littérature, en musique, la répétition donne du rythme, elle ponctue poétiquement l’énoncé. Ici, l’écho visuel relayé par la récurrence des formes géométriques, de mon propre point de vue, nourrie la cohérence de cette photographie. En prenant l’exemple de la photo ci-dessus, la somme d’indices plastiques connectés entre eux, comme les lignes verticales, les cadres rectangulaires, le disque formé par le panneau d’interdiction, sont autant de signal rythmique qui suggère une relation riche en interprétations dont je vous laisse la liberté d’en  trouver les clés selon votre culture personnelle ou vos émotions propres.

 

L’œil est en effet captivé par la répétition des motifs qui, stylistiquement, introduit des relations supplémentaires comme l’écho visuel de la passante en jilbab et celle en sari sur l’affiche. Ainsi, les répétition visuelles rapprochés par leur signifiant et leur signifié étant confronté : ils deviennent des point-clefsde l’image, comme ils le seraient, en d’autres termes des mots clés d’une poésie...

 

 

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Shadows in Greece | Photojournalist: Enri Canaj

Shadows in Greece | Photojournalist: Enri Canaj | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The centre of Athens, as I first remember it, was full of life.

During the period before the Olympic Games, there was great development. New hotels appeared in order to host the visitors, shops, restaurants and cafes kept sprouting up, it was full of people everywhere. All this happened within a few years. It was as if the city put on new clothes. During the days of the Olympics, the city was clean and well-guarded. You would not see street- merchants, drug-addicts or immigrants, just tourists and people who came in order to have a good time. In my eyes, it looked like another place.

 

As time passed, the city started deteriorating and gradually recovered its previous character: the everyday life that we all knew, with the junkies, the street-merchants, the the immigrants and the prostitutes.

Time passes fast. The city is now fading. Some people abandon it due to the crisis. Many shops and hotels have shut down, the centre is now almost deserted. People fear they will get ripped-off, they hear that this happens all the time. They no longer feel like going out and wandering about like before. They even fear seeing all the poverty and destitution, the drug-users who will rip you off for their shot, the women prostituting themselves.

 

But for me, those people were always there. I found them all there when I first arrived as a 9-year old child. They were always there when I was growing up. They are somehow trapped in their lives, subsisting in terrible circumstances, in squalid houses with insufficient hygiene.

Photo report's insight:

Enri Canaj was born in Tirana, Albania, in 1980. He spent his early childhood there and moved with his family to Greece in 1991, immediately after the opening of the borders. He is based in Athens and covers stories in Greece and the Balkans.

 

He studied photography at the Leica Academy in Athens. In 2007 he took part in a British Council project on migration, attending a year-long workshop with Magnum photographer Nikos Economopoulos.

Since 2008, he has been a freelance photographer for major publications such as Time Magazine Lightbox, Newsweek, Le monde Diplomatique (German edition),TO VIMA, TA NEA, Tachydromos and VIMAGAZINO. A sample of his work has been exhibited at the Cultural Foundation of the National Bank of Greece in Athens and Salonica, at the Bilgi Santral in Istanbul, the European Parliament in Brussels and the Athens Photo Festival.

 

He has been working in the Balkans, mainly Kosovo and Albania, as well as Greece, focusing on migration and the recent crisis.

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Sicarios | Photojournalist: Javier Arcenillas

Sicarios | Photojournalist: Javier Arcenillas | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

“One of the most popular and respected professions in Latin America is that of the sicarios.  Although revenues are variable (for killing someone), a hit can charge from 15 € up to tens of thousands), killing in Guatemala, Salvador, Honduras and Mexico is recruiting many young people, including minors, who are seduced  by the ease of earning money that gives them respect and fear.  In the process of training young killers from the poorest strata of society consumed they begin killing dogs and pets to loose all your nerves.”  - Javier Arcenilla

Photo report's insight:

Javier Arcenilla is described as a Humanist, Freelance photographer and member of Gea Photowords. He develops humanitarian essays where the main characters are integrated in societies that borders and sets upon any reason or (human) right in a world that becomes increasingly more and more indifferent.

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Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala

Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Democratic Republic of Congo has the dubious honour of holding two records. The first, paradoxically, comes from a natural blessing: it is the country on the African continent with the largest mineral wealth. But the gold, diamonds and Coltan (colombo-tantalite ore) have been and are an active part of the civil conflict in which Congo is submerged. The second is that it is the country with the largest number of victims from armed conflict since the Second World War. An estimated 4-5 million human beings have died because of the civil war since 1996.

 

The Rwanda genocide in 1994–which killed close to one million people, mostly Tutsis and moderate Hutus–created ideal conditions in the eastern Congo for horror, death and destruction. Since the end of the genocide, the Rwandan Tutsi troops have maintained an active role in the region: they organize and arm local pro-Tutsi guerrillas like the CNDP (French: Congrès National pour la Défense du Peuple) under the justification that Hutu militias...- Álvaro Ybarra Zavala 

 

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