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Syrian refugees in Iraq | Photographer: Andy Spyra

Syrian refugees in Iraq | Photographer: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

"With the civil war ongoing, Syria's Christians have, just as their brethren in Iraq, been caught in the crossfire: endangered and largely forgotten, they have become victims of someone else’s war. At the time of writing, only the Christians in the north-eastern Kurdish areas are still living in considerable safe conditions. The town of Qamishli, unofficial capital of the syrian Kurds and located directly at the turkish-syrian border has become one of the last safe havens for Syria's Christians and will be the focus of my documentation." - Andy Spyra

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One of the most touching images in history | Photojournalist: Joe O'Donnell

One of the most touching images in history | Photojournalist: Joe O'Donnell | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Stoic Japanese Orphan, Standing At Attention Having Brought His Dead Younger Brother To A Cremation Pyre, Nagasaki, By American Photographer, Joe O’Donnell 1945"

 

Although his name is unknown, we know a lot about him. The child was about 10 years old and survived the crash. Unfortunately, as a result of an air raid killed all his loved ones. Orphaned boy, survived along with his younger brother, which he wore tied back. The child had bowed his head and seemed to be very strongly sleep. His older brother, erect, without shoes and with a straight face, he came to the vicinity of the funeral pile on which the corpses were burned victims.

 

He stood there a few minutes, when finally went to him the man in the white mask, which is responsible for burning the bodies. The silence began to take off attached to the back of the boy child. He grabbed them by the arms and legs and put on the stack. Boy's little brother was already dead.

 

That direction by a photo of Joe O'Donnell's situation, a photographer working for the U.S. Marines. When in 1945 he was sent to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by documenting the bombing and the U.S. occupation, he was only 23 years old. The air raid destroyed cities nearby spent up to 6 months. Those events permanently etched in his memory.

 

O'Donnell saw the whole situation and observed the behavior of the boy who brought his brother to burn his body. When the child was buried at the stake, the boy stood still and watched the flames. His face remained impassive, but you could see that little hero biting his lower lip so hard that it started to bleed. Then he turned and walked away in silence.

Photo report's insight:

Joseph (Joe) Roger O'Donnell (May 7, 1922 – August 9, 2007) was an American documentarian, photojournalist and a photographer for the United States Information Agency. Born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, his most famous work was documenting photographically the immediate aftermath of the atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945 and 1946 as a Marine photographer. He died in Nashville, Tennessee.

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Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala

Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Democratic Republic of Congo has the dubious honour of holding two records. The first, paradoxically, comes from a natural blessing: it is the country on the African continent with the largest mineral wealth. But the gold, diamonds and Coltan (colombo-tantalite ore) have been and are an active part of the civil conflict in which Congo is submerged. The second is that it is the country with the largest number of victims from armed conflict since the Second World War. An estimated 4-5 million human beings have died because of the civil war since 1996.

 

The Rwanda genocide in 1994–which killed close to one million people, mostly Tutsis and moderate Hutus–created ideal conditions in the eastern Congo for horror, death and destruction. Since the end of the genocide, the Rwandan Tutsi troops have maintained an active role in the region: they organize and arm local pro-Tutsi guerrillas like the CNDP (French: Congrès National pour la Défense du Peuple) under the justification that Hutu militias...- Álvaro Ybarra Zavala 

 

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Scrap metal collectors | Photojournalist: Javier Manzano

Scrap metal collectors | Photojournalist: Javier Manzano | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

On the periphery of Bagram Airfield, farmers, scrap-metal collectors and sheep herders have been crippled, blinded and burned by U.S. military ammunition on an unfenced and poorly marked training ground.

Photo report's insight:

Full article : http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/next-to-us-firing-range-in-afghanistan-a-village-of-victims/2012/05/26/gJQAeQEIsU_story.html

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The 2006 Lebanon War | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

The 2006 Lebanon War | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Samuel Aranda Phototographer
Photo report's insight:

"The 2006 Lebanon War – know in Lebanon as the July War, and in Israel as the Second Lebanon War – was a 34-day military conflict un Lebanon and norther Israel between Israel and Hezbollah.

The conflict left hundreds of dead and thousands of displaced. Whole families lost everything during the war." - Samuel Aranda

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Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda

Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Arab al-Jahalin is the biggest bedouin community that lives in the West Bank Area called E-1, part of the Area C, where Israel retains control over security as well as planning and zoning, and holds strategic significance for further expansion of illegal Israeli settlements.


The bedouins live in miserable shacks, without electricity or running water, grazing their sheeps between debris and dreaming of the flourishing desert of Beersheva, where they have been forcefully evicted, across the 1949 armistice lines by Israeli authorities. In the last 15 years the Bedouin communities have been subject to demolition, requisition of cattle, attacks by settlers, aimed to get away from the area.


But despite this, the communities have shown determination and unbelievable resilience, who led the Israeli military authorities to draw up a "plan of relocation" which ignore the aspirations, needs, traditions and the system of relations inherent in the Bedouin culture. The plan provides the deportation and a forced establishment of the Jahalin tribe next to the rubbish dump of Abu Dis. - Giuliano Camarda

Photo report's insight:

Giuliano Camarda is a freelance photographer since 2008.
He has worked in Bosnia Herzegovina developing several issues about the war aftermath. Actually he's working in the Occupied Palestinian Territories on a long term project. Mainly focused on projects with social and humanitarian aspects. He collaborated with NGOs such as CESVI, Caritas Italiana, La Carovana del sorriso, Vento di Terra. His works have been published on National Geographic Italia, Repubblica.it, Sky TG24, Foreign Policy, ABC News, Donna Moderna, Witness Journal,

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The July War | Photojournalist: Timothy Fadek

The July War | Photojournalist: Timothy Fadek | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

With the firestorm coming from the Rathergate crowd, and doubts now spreading from the left wingabout images from Lebanon, it can start to feel like all reason is being subsumed by political hysteria.  At the same time, war photojournalism seems at risk of being tarred with one brush.

I spent about a half-hour on the phone this evening with photojournalist and contributer Tim Fadek, who has been in Lebanon for about three weeks covering the war.

 

Having been present following the Qana air strike, Tim emphasized that there was no parading or manipulation of bodies, and that the scene was not staged in any way.  That said, Tim took pains to explain how this kind of situation carries with it certain cultural practices and emotional responses that don’t transfer well to the West.  This seems especially true right now, in the super-heated and intensely polarized political environment in the U.S.

"When there is senseless death in this part of the world," Tim explains, "it is completely normal to display the bodies.  Whether in plastic or on blankets, it’s done whether there are photographers there or not.  The idea is to ready the public for what has happened, and also say, look what our enemies have done to us."

 

Regarding the images cited as evidence of manipulation, Fadek said: "a finer distinction is being lost in the West.  In Qana, rescue workers did not hold up a baby to set up a shot.  They were not displaying them to the media, per se.  Yes, it was not lost on these men that the cameras presented a window to the world.  But these people were doing wrenching rescue work and they are human beings.  These instances [of holding up babies] were mostly spontaneous and momentary expressions of anger."

Tim also explained the circumstances surrounding his own images.  Although he felt the photo above was more powerful shown this way, he explained that a rescue worker did set down the body, briefly uncovering it for photographers to document.

For those inclined to consider the depictions as manipulated, Fadek also offers the following image, along with the circumstances involved.


Once removed from the collapsed building, these bodies were set on the ground to be taken down a hill.   From this spot to the waiting ambulances was at least a four minute walk.  In this case, the two children were placed on this blanket where photographers had 1 1/2 to to 2 seconds to document them.  Given the distance and the available manpower, the two bodies were placed on the same blanket to save effort.

In each case, Tim’s understanding was that the rescuers were acting in a manner reflecting a normal attitude toward the dead.  "It’s not a manipulation, it’s a cultural distinction," said Fadek.  "It’s the same as at a martyrs funeral, where faces are exposed, and the bodies marched through the streets.  It’s been done for years, media or otherwise."

Photo report's insight:

The July War : Timothy Fadek is an american photographer whose assignment work has been published in Time, Newsweek, The New York Times Magazine, Stern, Le Monde, National Geographic and scores of other publications.

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Target Unknown | Photographer: Stacy Kranitz

Target Unknown | Photographer: Stacy Kranitz | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Once a year in Pennsylvania, 500 people come together to reenact the Battle of the Bulge. During the reenactment, I portray Leni Riefenstahl and behave with soldiers, as she would have. Rather than seek out a simple role model who fit a classic heroine profile, I became intrigued by the complex story of a woman I could both love and hate. In Riefenstahl, I found a multidimensional character with a focused vision and a murky set of morals. These grey areas spoke to my desire to understand people beyond the constraints of good versus evil. This experience allows me to reflect upon atrocity, delve into my own relationship with my Jewish heritage, and contemplate the camera's ability to re-imagine history. "

 

"I have inserted myself into the Nazi reenactor photographs in an effort to subvert the viewer’s instinct to dismiss these people as different from themselves. I believe that the grey areas between ethical imperatives may offer new potential to understand and relate to a subject.
Much of our conception of history is based on images. The reenactors base the authenticity of their looks on images and, in particular, on Riefenstahl’s film Triumph of the Will. Historical images have been filtered through media and propaganda. These images become history as generations pass, memories fade. Photographs and film become the dominant forces that shape the public imagination. My newly created images of the reenactment are part of the deconstruction process by which images first represent and then replace history."

(Stacy Kranitz : http://stacykranitzprojects.com/targetunknown)

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