BLACK AND WHITE
Follow
Find tag "story"
19.8K views | +0 today
BLACK AND WHITE
Wonderful black and white photography
Curated by Photo report
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders

Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In 2000 I was travelling through Russia and other parts of the former Soviet Union developing a project on the transmission of HIV through intravenous drug use. I stumbled upon a group of young kids who were being chased from a McDonalds restaurant by a very aggressive restaurant manager. I intervened to prevent the manager beating the kids on the street. The kids had been removing leftovers from empty tables. This act led me into an underground world where young children live and die in the most squalid and horrible conditions I have ever experienced. Orphans, runaways, wee broken souls fending for themselves in a cruel and unforgiving world.- David Gillanders

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Big Mama and Fukumaru the Cat | Photographer: Miyoko IHARA

Big Mama and Fukumaru the Cat  | Photographer: Miyoko IHARA | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Here’s a tale of friendship and love that will warm your heart and put a smile on your face.

 

In all started 12 years ago when Miyoko Ihara first started to take candid photographs of her grandmother Misa. She wanted to document Misa’s life, her routine, passion and hobbies to share with future generations.

One day Misa found a tiny kitten in one of her garden sheds – to this day nobody knows how the bi-colored kitten got there, but Misa lovingly gave her a home and the name ‘Fukumaru’ – a Japanese reference to good fortune and peace. 8 years on, Fukumaru is her loyal companion ever by her side (except when perched up high on a pole!) and keeping the 87-year-old company.

 

You can instantly feel the warmth, love, friendship and affection both Fukumaru and Misa have for one another from Miyoko’s exquisite  photographs. Both cat and owner suffer from poor hearing, but it matters little, as these images highlight – you don’t always need words to express how you feel.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto

PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Article 18 of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Cambodia: “the state will protect the rights of children, particularly the right to life, education, and protection during times of war, in addition to protection against economic and sexual exploitation”.

At present Cambodia has around 14 million inhabitants, a number which has increased favourably in recent years due to the period of relative peace the country has experienced since 1993.  Depending on the time of year, the capital, Phnom Penh, has between two and three million inhabitants.

In a country where 81% of the population gain their livelihood from agriculture, the climate determines everything.  However, the extreme poverty in rural areas, the non-existence of technological farming, climatic instability, etc., are all factors which force the population to emigrate to the city in hope of finding a better life.  Unfortunately, what usually happens in these cases is that life does not become better, but the complete opposite.  Due to the parents’ inability to look after all the family members, Cambodian boys and girls have the tendency to start fending for themselves from a very early age.

 

 In the capital, approximately half the children and teenagers who look after themselves have arrived alone from surrounding provinces, with only a few coins in their pockets.  Some of the children will return to their villages after a few days, weeks, or even months.  Others will spend so long on the street that it becomes impossible to return, simply because they forget who they are and where they come from.  At their roots there is always a completely unstructured family unit, in most cases because of extreme poverty, AIDS, or alcoholism which almost always transforms into domestic violence.

Organised into small groups, the bonds that the children build amongst themselves are strong, deep and sincere; as primitive as the survival instinct itself.  Malnutrition, illness, drug abuse, sexual harassment from tourists, traffic…these are all daily threats that the children face.  Perhaps, above all of those, the lack of affection from society, the feeling of abandonment and the shortage of self-confidence could be seen as the strongest and most pressing threat of all.  Forgotten by their politicians who are immersed in dismantling their country in the shortest possible time, at the moment the only valid option the children have to leave the street is to go through an NGO.  This, however, will never be the solution to the problem.

 

Photo report's insight:

Another link of photo documentary: http://www.fotovisura.com/user/MikeA/view/rue-24-phnom-penh-kampuchea

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

THE CRESCENT | Photographer: Paolo Pellegrin

THE CRESCENT | Photographer: Paolo Pellegrin | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Several police officers search a house for an armed suspect.

The area of Rochester, New York, USA, where these pictures were taken is part of the so-called 'Crescent', a moon-shaped area that runs across several city neighborhoods. Crime rates here are significantly higher than the rest of Rochester. The Crescent is home to 27 percent of the city's residents and 80 percent of the city's homicides. The causes of the burst of violence include the lagging upstate economy, a steady migration of residents to the suburbs, and a growing number of abandoned houses prone to become centers of drug sales and use. Rochester also has a school system that performs poorly. People inside the Crescent experience those problems in greater concentration.

Photo report's insight:

ABOUT: 

Paolo Pellegrin was born in 1964 in Rome, Italy. He studied architecture at Sapienza Università di Roma, before moving on to photography at the Istituto Italiano di Fotografia, also in the Italian capital. Between 1991 and 2001, Pellegrin was represented by Agence VU in Paris. In 2001, he became a Magnum Photos nominee, and a full member in 2005. He is a contract photographer for Newsweek magazine in the US and Zeit magazine in Germany.

 

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

CAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark IIISHUTTER SPEED: 1/30 secISO: 6400F-STOP: 2.5FOCAL LENGTH: 50 mm 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Wanawake | Photographer: Martina BACIGALUPO

Wanawake | Photographer: Martina BACIGALUPO | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Every minute in the world a woman dies of childbirth. 99% of these women live in developing countries. More than half of them live in sub-Saharan Africa. For every maternal death, 20 women suffer pregnancy-related injuries, infections or diseases and, in some case, long term disabilities. The majority of maternal deaths and disabilities can be prevented through access to basic health-care services during pregnancy and delivery.

The more affected are women living in poverty, who lack the decision-making power and the financial resources to access basic health care.
The lack of progress in reducing maternal mortality highlights the low price placed on the lives of these women and testifies to their limited public voice.
In the urban western world a woman reaches a hospital in less than 7 minutes. In the Congo women who manage to reach a health center have walked, pregnant and alone for hours, often for days." - Martina Bacigalupo

Photo report's insight:

Martina Bacigalupo was born in 1978 in Genova.

She is member of Agence Vu in Paris.

more...
Zahida's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:10 PM

This article interests me because of the major differeances in the avaerage time it takes for women to get to the hospital when they become pregnent. In the urban western world a women gets to the hospital while in the Congo, women get to the hospital after walking for hours or even days. Many people want to help in a specific way want to donate to a cause that they know that they can directly impact people.  The half the sky book concentrates on specific examples, while this article concentrates on one aspect of the overall goal that the Half the Sky book is trying to promote. 

Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Fighting for a voice | Photojournalist: Bob Miller

Fighting for a voice | Photojournalist: Bob Miller | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In April 2010, United States ambassador Michael Ranneberger called on the young people of Kenya to seize active roles in the reform of their nation. After moving around the country interacting with young people, the envoy said he sensed “a sea change of attitude” among youths,“a tidal wave below the surface. The youth have woken up.” 

 

Less than three years earlier, post-election violence surrounding the rigged presidential elections left 1,200 dead and 600,000 displaced in Kenya. Yet, over the last two years, various grassroots initiatives led by youth have begun to improve quality of life for those in the direst of conditions. Termed “youth groups” on the streets, these initiatives could represent the future of long-term socioeconomic development in Kenya, and its neighboring countries. Members of the Usafi Youth Group in Kibera dig pit latrines to remove waste mounds in the slum, covering the newly fertilized earth with sustainable agriculture projects.

 

Other groups are building community bath houses in the poorest of areas, and organizing meetings to educate the community on the risk of HIV/AIDS. Within this progressive youth culture is the Kibera Olympic Boxing Club, a group of low-income adolescents from the slum who use sport to stay off the street and involved in the community. These youth are a microcosm of the greater movement toward reform, and a generation fighting for a voice.- Bob Miller

Photo report's insight:

Bob Miller is photographer, filmmaker and multimedia storyteller based in Alabama.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Photo report
Scoop.it!

Mirella | Photographer: Fausto Podavini

Mirella | Photographer: Fausto Podavini | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Fausto Podavini is an italian photographer, winner at the last World Press Photo Awards in Daily Life Stories with the photo above. Part of the Project “Mirella”. “Despite her husband’s life-threatening disease, Mirella devoted her life to assisting Luigi, trying to be positive and reassuring, looking after him with intense love and respect. Everyday care, usually done in a few minutes, takes hours when it concerns someone with dementia. Mirella, 71, spent 43 years of her life with the only person she loved, with all of life’s difficulties, laughter, and beautiful moments. But over the last six years things changed: Mirella lived with her husband Luigi’s illness, Alzheimer’s, and devoted her life to him as his caregiver.”

more...
No comment yet.