BLACK AND WHITE
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BLACK AND WHITE
Wonderful black and white photography
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The 13th floor | Photographer: David Gillanders

The 13th floor | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Paul Mann, and Marie Ward are living in desperate poverty in one of the remaining high rise block of flats in the Gorbals, Glasgow. The council accommodation they live in, which is scheduled for demolition, is riddled with dampness causing illness to their children. Both Marie and Paul are long term, third generation unemployed and are completely dependent on the state, not just for benefit but for help in caring for their 4 children. The family have since be relocated to a newly built townhouse in the Gorbals but continue to struggle." - David Gillanders

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Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word "karoshi" came into common use around 1990, when Japanese workers began working longer hours in response to competition from overseas and the recession at the time. Despite increased awareness of the dangers of overwork, de-regulation and increased global competition means that Japanese workers are working harder than ever.


About 20 years ago, heart attacks or strokes were a symbol of ‘karoshi’ in Japan. Today, workers are committing suicide. Of the more than 30,000 suicides recorded 2009, 10,000 were believed to be related to work, according to data from the national police agency. Suicide triggered by overwork is particularly prevalent among white color workers, also known as “salarymen” in Japan. Salarymen devote long work hours and loyalty to companies in exchange for a life-time of employment and benefits.

 

With the recession of the 1990s and the lifting of a ban on the use of cheap temporary laborers, salarymen increasingly work longer hours because of a shortage of manpower and the fear of losing jobs.

Photo report's insight:

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.
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Benedyct Antifer's curator insight, March 26, 2013 12:39 PM

Travail impressionnant sur une société qui aliène de plus en plus la seule richesse dont elle dispose : les gens qui la compose...

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Chineses | Photos Liu Zheng 刘铮

Chineses | Photos Liu Zheng 刘铮 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Liu Zheng est un photographe chinois né en 1969 dans le comté de Wuqiang, province de Hebei. Il passa son enfance dans la ville minière de Datong (province de Shanxi), avant de vivre et de travailler à Beijing.

En 1994, Liu Zheng commença de photographier des moments de vie dans lesquels des personnages chinois typiques ont été rencontrés dans des situations extrêmes et souvent inattendues. La série The Chinese tire le portrait d'une société en butte aux contradictions entre la culture traditionnelle et la modernisation. Elle présente un large échantillonnage de la société et montre les riches, les pauvres, les transsexuels, les mineurs, les acteurs d'opéra, aussi bien que les figures de cire des musées historiques.

De 1991 à 1997, Zheng a travaillé comme reporter pour le Workers’ Daily, un des journeaux chinois les plus lus, dans l'optique de montrer les liens historiques entre la propagande politique et l'idéologie communiste, plutôt que de viser les rapports de la photographie avec la vérité. Il commença de travailler sur le thème des Chinois à un moment de changements explosifs et de développement de l'art contemporain, catalysé par les réformes en cours. Dans ce contexte, Zheng utilise la photographie pour construire une fausse réalité. Les éclairages et les poses de ses photographies au format carré semblent un peu naïfs mais en réalité la mise en scène coexiste avec les éléments spontanés dans toute cette série.

Influencée à la fois par les œuvres de Diane Arbus et d'August Sander, la série The Chinese montre au spectateur une étude personnalisée de la culture chinoise, concentrée sur les aspects psychologiques les plus sombres. Un mélange de dure réalité et de romantisme, d'engagement et de détachement, tente de reconstituer l’histoire des Chinois par ce processus.

 

Publications The Chinese .- Göttingen, Allemagne, Steidl et New-York, International Center of Photography, 2004. (ISBN 3-86521-037-6)

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Transformations | Photographer: Mariette Pathy Allen

Transformations | Photographer: Mariette Pathy Allen | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

It was 1978 in New Orleans on the last day of Mardi Gras when photographer Mariette Pathy Allen happened upon a group of crossdressing men in a hotel—a chance encounter that would lead to a multi-decade exploration of the transgender community. Shot throughout the 1980s, Transformationscompiles portraits of crossdressers in their homes and with their loved ones in an attempt to offer society a different view of a group that had been quite mis-characterized at the time. Allen was a pioneering powerhouse at the inception of this work, which was published into a book in 1989. She has since continued to inspire gender consciousness with the publication of her second book, The Gender Frontier that compiles photographs, interviews, and essays exploring political activism and transgender youth. Allen has also been a valuable consultant to several films about gender and sexuality over the years.

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The Disabled | Photojournalist: Ohm Phanphiroj

The Disabled | Photojournalist: Ohm Phanphiroj | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In Thailand, disabled individuals can be seen everywhere in the form of beggars, traveling the streets in Bangkok and asking for money. There are no laws intended to provide and improve the quality of life for these people. Roads, sidewalks, walkways are never equipped or adjusted to provide for wheelchairs or the blind. These unfortunate souls are considered a problem rather than as sharing in equal rights and status. They are looked down upon, although with a certain amount of sympathy. There are only a few facilities and organizations created to support and house them. Likewise, the budgets set aside for these places are minimal at best. Meager at worst.

 

The Disabled project is driven by the curiosity to understand how the disabled lives, functions and survives on a daily basis. In my search to learn more, I went to a male disabled rehabilitation and housing center on the outskirts of Bangkok. There the haunting and, at times, graphic images of an overburdened and failed care system can be seen. The place is both vastly under staffed and under budgeted, and the ratio of caregivers to patients is 1:40 or 50. Most of the patients living there have been abandoned by their families, not by choice but because their family has no means to take care of them, so subsequently they are brought to the center to be taken care of.

 

Patients are seen sleeping on the pavement out in the sun, tied to a secure pole or to a bed. The quality of the place is sub-standard, despite the good intentions of the few staffers who work there, with the condition of each patient varying, from physical to mental, to, in many cases, both.

It is my sincere desire to document the condition of the center along with the treatment of its patients. The images I have captured thus far are harrowing, haunting and very visceral. The feelings of loneliness and emptiness are prominent. I want to create a visual commentary that conveys these feelings along with the utter sense of despair and isolation I felt for the place and its patients.

 

With this project, I hope to help bridge the gap between those in need in our society and society itself. I wish to raise awareness and bring needed attention and better understanding of the existing conditions and to improve the quality of life for these people. I want to capture hope for the hopeless and dream for the few dreams the disabled have left. The project is my very personal and privileged journey into a space most do not care to venture, or simply refuse to acknowledge.- Ohm Phanphiroj

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