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Call me Heena | Photographer: Shahria Sharmin

Call me Heena  | Photographer: Shahria Sharmin | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"“I feel like a mermaid. My body tells me that I am a man but my soul tells me that I am a woman. I am like a flower, a flower that is made of paper. I shall always be loved from a distance, never to be touched and no smell to fall in love with.” Heena. Hijra, a term of South Asia which have no exact match in the modern western taxonomy of gender, designated as male at birth with feminine gender identity and eventually adopts feminine gender roles. They are often grossly labeled as hermaphrodites, eunuchs, transgender or transsexual women in literature, presently a more justified social term for them is the Third Gender. Transcending the biological definition, Hijras are more of social phenomena as a minority group and have a long recorded history in South Asia. However, their overall social acceptance and present conditions of living vary significantly in countries like Bangladesh, India and Pakistan."

 

"Perhaps the Hijras in Bangladesh faces the worst situation, which forces a good number of them to leave their motherland, to migrate to India. Instead of coming from various social and family backgrounds, Hijras feel a strong sense of belongings to their groups. These groups give them the shelter of a family and the warmth of human relationship. Outside the group, they are discriminated and scorned almost everywhere. Traditionally they used to earn their living based on the cultural belief that Hijras can bless one’s house with prosperity and fertility. Because of our shared geographical and cultural history of the subcontinent, this particular Hindu belief slowly made room in the Muslim culture of this land. Times have changed and Hijras have lost their admired space in the society. Now they make a living by walking around the streets collecting money from shopkeepers, bus and train passengers or by prostitution. I, like almost everyone else in my society, grew up seeing them as less than human..." - Shahria Sharmin

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Syrian refugees in Iraq | Photographer: Andy Spyra

Syrian refugees in Iraq | Photographer: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

"With the civil war ongoing, Syria's Christians have, just as their brethren in Iraq, been caught in the crossfire: endangered and largely forgotten, they have become victims of someone else’s war. At the time of writing, only the Christians in the north-eastern Kurdish areas are still living in considerable safe conditions. The town of Qamishli, unofficial capital of the syrian Kurds and located directly at the turkish-syrian border has become one of the last safe havens for Syria's Christians and will be the focus of my documentation." - Andy Spyra

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The 13th floor | Photographer: David Gillanders

The 13th floor | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Paul Mann, and Marie Ward are living in desperate poverty in one of the remaining high rise block of flats in the Gorbals, Glasgow. The council accommodation they live in, which is scheduled for demolition, is riddled with dampness causing illness to their children. Both Marie and Paul are long term, third generation unemployed and are completely dependent on the state, not just for benefit but for help in caring for their 4 children. The family have since be relocated to a newly built townhouse in the Gorbals but continue to struggle." - David Gillanders

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Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ

Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Albania is a small country in the heart of the Balkans. Despite its rich culture, people outside do generally not know much about it. It is also my homeland, the place of my early childhood. I grew up seperated from it, and returned later to pick up the threads that were left behind. 

What I found was modernity and tradition living together. I traveled a lot and started to know my birthplace, the people, their mentality, and their traditions. I felt very welcome, and was fascinated by all the people I met. They were kind, friendly and curious about my work.

 

I made this journey together with my wife. When people realized we were a couple, they were very open, they welcomed us inside their homes and extended wishes, blessings and congratulations. Marriage is very important in Albania. Everyone has to get married, it is considered to make men stronger and more respected in society.

 

In this photographic project I would like to show the everyday lives of Albanian people – the big picture, as well as the small, seemingly insignificant moments. What impressed me most was the strong family union, the connection among people. I found it everywhere – in married young couples and their babies, at a funeral ceremony where relatives shared their pain, at a wedding party, or when a son accompanied his father at work. I didn’t see any lonely people. - 

ENRI CANAJ
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The 2006 Lebanon War | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

The 2006 Lebanon War | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Samuel Aranda Phototographer
Photo report's insight:

"The 2006 Lebanon War – know in Lebanon as the July War, and in Israel as the Second Lebanon War – was a 34-day military conflict un Lebanon and norther Israel between Israel and Hezbollah.

The conflict left hundreds of dead and thousands of displaced. Whole families lost everything during the war." - Samuel Aranda

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Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres

Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Fernando Moleres was born in Bilbao, Spain in 1963. He began work as a nurse in his home village, traveling in 1987 to pursue that calling in Nicaragua, during the Sandinista period. It was there that Moleres began to appreciate the value of photography and to teach himself how to do it. During the early 1990s, he combined nursing work with long periods traveling and doing photo projects, such as Children at Work, which lasted several years and took him to many countries. His photos have appeared in a number of international publications, such as Stern, Le Figaro Magazine, Le Monde 2, La Republica, Io Donna, The Independent and The Sunday Times Magazine. Moleres has published two books and has had more than 20 solo exhibitions worldwide. His honors include a Picture of the Year 2011, two previous World Press Photo prizes (in 2008 and 1998), a W. Eugene Smith Grant, a Erna and Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant, and a Lucia Award 2012 Deeper Perspectives Award, among others. Moleres is now based in Barcelona.

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Shadows in Greece | Photojournalist: Enri Canaj

Shadows in Greece | Photojournalist: Enri Canaj | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The centre of Athens, as I first remember it, was full of life.

During the period before the Olympic Games, there was great development. New hotels appeared in order to host the visitors, shops, restaurants and cafes kept sprouting up, it was full of people everywhere. All this happened within a few years. It was as if the city put on new clothes. During the days of the Olympics, the city was clean and well-guarded. You would not see street- merchants, drug-addicts or immigrants, just tourists and people who came in order to have a good time. In my eyes, it looked like another place.

 

As time passed, the city started deteriorating and gradually recovered its previous character: the everyday life that we all knew, with the junkies, the street-merchants, the the immigrants and the prostitutes.

Time passes fast. The city is now fading. Some people abandon it due to the crisis. Many shops and hotels have shut down, the centre is now almost deserted. People fear they will get ripped-off, they hear that this happens all the time. They no longer feel like going out and wandering about like before. They even fear seeing all the poverty and destitution, the drug-users who will rip you off for their shot, the women prostituting themselves.

 

But for me, those people were always there. I found them all there when I first arrived as a 9-year old child. They were always there when I was growing up. They are somehow trapped in their lives, subsisting in terrible circumstances, in squalid houses with insufficient hygiene.

Photo report's insight:

Enri Canaj was born in Tirana, Albania, in 1980. He spent his early childhood there and moved with his family to Greece in 1991, immediately after the opening of the borders. He is based in Athens and covers stories in Greece and the Balkans.

 

He studied photography at the Leica Academy in Athens. In 2007 he took part in a British Council project on migration, attending a year-long workshop with Magnum photographer Nikos Economopoulos.

Since 2008, he has been a freelance photographer for major publications such as Time Magazine Lightbox, Newsweek, Le monde Diplomatique (German edition),TO VIMA, TA NEA, Tachydromos and VIMAGAZINO. A sample of his work has been exhibited at the Cultural Foundation of the National Bank of Greece in Athens and Salonica, at the Bilgi Santral in Istanbul, the European Parliament in Brussels and the Athens Photo Festival.

 

He has been working in the Balkans, mainly Kosovo and Albania, as well as Greece, focusing on migration and the recent crisis.

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Sicarios | Photojournalist: Javier Arcenillas

Sicarios | Photojournalist: Javier Arcenillas | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

“One of the most popular and respected professions in Latin America is that of the sicarios.  Although revenues are variable (for killing someone), a hit can charge from 15 € up to tens of thousands), killing in Guatemala, Salvador, Honduras and Mexico is recruiting many young people, including minors, who are seduced  by the ease of earning money that gives them respect and fear.  In the process of training young killers from the poorest strata of society consumed they begin killing dogs and pets to loose all your nerves.”  - Javier Arcenilla

Photo report's insight:

Javier Arcenilla is described as a Humanist, Freelance photographer and member of Gea Photowords. He develops humanitarian essays where the main characters are integrated in societies that borders and sets upon any reason or (human) right in a world that becomes increasingly more and more indifferent.

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Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra

Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I first came to Kashmir in the early spring of 2007 at the end of a motorcycle trip across India and I fell in love with the people, the light, and the atmosphere of this remote place. But as much as I love it, the political situation of the valley continues to bring disorder and conflict. 

Currently there are two conflicts in Kashmir, and each is tightly woven into the other: The more known conflict is the international, atomically loaded border dispute between India and its archenemy, Pakistan, regarding the affiliation of Kashmir between the two states. The other, less known one, is the inner-Kashmiri conflict on the Indian side of the border (which is two- thirds of the complete territory), where the people struggle for independence from India.  I have spent the last two years documenting this conflict, most recently in the summer of 2009 when I spent two months on the Indian side.

I attended meetings of parents who have had children disappear without leaving a note or ever coming back. I was invited into homes where family members mourned the rape and murder of two young girls by paramilitary forces.  I photographed a family whose sons were shot during one of the countless demonstrations.  These experiences didn‘t differ from my last two trips to Kashmir - the political and social climate remained the same as it was when I left the region half a year prior. The slogans were also the same during the countless demonstrations against the Indian army, the symbol of the occupation of what the Kashmiris call their soil: “Ham ka chate? Azadi!"- "What do we want? Freedom!" 

Looking over the sixty-year history of this conflict, it seems highly unlikely that the people of Kashmir will gain independence in the foreseeable future and that the world will see an independent Kashmir again. This strategic region is too important for either nation to ever let it go.- Andy Spyra

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CAPITOLIO | Photographer: Christopher Anderson

CAPITOLIO | Photographer: Christopher Anderson | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word ‘capitolio’ refers to the domed building that houses a government. Here, the city of Caracas, Venezuela, is itself a metaphorical capitolio building. The decaying Modernist architecture, with a jungle growing through the cracks, becomes the walls of this building and the violent streets become the corridors where the human drama plays itself out in what President Hugo Chavez called a ‘revolution.’

Originally published as a traditional book in 2010 by RM, “Capitolio” is an intimate journey through a time of revolution in Hugo Chavez’ Caracas, Venezuela. This series was photographed between 2004 and 2008.

 

Photo report's insight:

Christopher Anderson is a photographer and member of the Magnum Photos agency

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Ioan Tasi's comment, May 13, 2013 1:12 PM
wonderful.
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Kham Territory | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi

Kham Territory | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Kham is the name of the plateau located on the eastern third of Tibet. It is divided between the Chinese provinces of Yunnan, Sichuan and Qinghai (only the first two are represented in these photographs).  In spite of being historically and culturally united to Tibet’s central territory, Kham has various special characteristics such as the fighting spirit of its inhabitants.  The proportion of Tibetans varies in the region. There are fewer the more east you go towards China.  The majority are farmers and cattle breeders who leave trade and business in the hands of the Chinese.  Living together is not always easy between the two communities.- Mikel Aristregi

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LIFE IN WAR | Photojopurnalist: Majid Saeedi

LIFE IN WAR | Photojopurnalist: Majid Saeedi | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Herat, Afghanistan

Zahra, 20, burned herself four years ago. Women are in a subordinate position in Afghan society, where conservative Islamic laws and tribal traditions dictate what they are allowed to do. Forced marriages, domestic violence, poverty, and lack of access to education are said to be some of the main reasons for self-immolation.

Afghanistan has dealt with decades of war - sometimes under attack from other countries and at other times with civil wars. As a result, Afghans suffer from serious traumas and hurt as survivors of war, whether children who have lost parents or single mothers managing for their families after their husbands have been killed. Despite poverty, drug addiction, and lack of education, life goes on in Afghanistan as people continue to try to heal and live with hope.

Photo report's insight:

Majid Saeedi is an award-winning, internationally recognized Iranian photographer. He has photographed throughout the Middle East for the past two decades, focusing on humanitarian issues, with a special interest in telling previously untold stories of social injustice. He also especially enjoys doing street photography – portraying citizens and ordinary life. TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II

SHUTTER SPEED: 1/100 sec
ISO: 640
F-STOP: 4
FOCAL LENGTH: 105 mm  

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SCHOOL FOR LESS FORTUNATE | Photographer: ALTAF QADRI

SCHOOL FOR LESS FORTUNATE | Photographer: ALTAF QADRI | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

07 November 2012

New Delhi, India

Every morning, children from nearby slums arrive in small groups, barefoot and carrying mats and brooms and start cleaning a portion of a land under a metro rail bridge, which will be their school for the rest of the morning. Rajesh Kumar Sharma, along with his friend, founded the free school for underprivileged children under a metro bridge a year ago. He teaches at least 45 children every day. Sharma, a 40-year-old father of three from Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous state, was forced to drop out of college in his third year due to financial difficulties. He didn't want other children to face the same difficulties, so he decided to start the free school.

 

He persuaded local laborers and farmers to allow their children to attend his school instead of working to add to the family income. He prepares these children for admission to government schools and hopes to equip them with the tools necessary to overcome their poverty. Millions of dollars are given to fund the education of poor children in India, however it often doesn't reach them because of corruption and arduous administrative procedures.

Photo report's insight:

TECHNICAL INFORMATIONSHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 100F-STOP: 1.4FOCAL LENGTH: 50CAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II

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Minor Miners | Photographer: Suzanne Lee

Minor Miners | Photographer: Suzanne Lee | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Minor Miners is my ongoing investigation into child labour in Indian coalmines and broader socio-economic realities that force families to use their children as full-time breadwinners doing hard labour. I explore not just the day-to-day conditions of life imposed on India's weakest and most vulnerable, but also the extensive socio-economic institutions that create these dire situations. India has the largest number of child labourers under the age of 14 in the world. With an estimated 12.6million children engaged in hazardous occupations, India's seemingly impressive economic growth of hides the crushing poverty that remain a harsh reality for millions of her children. I have been photographing the working/living conditions of child miners along India’s ‘coal-belt’ and will continue by traveling to the children’s origins, probing the core desperations they confronted, pushing them to taking these steps. Problems like displacement and loss of livelihood in their homelands can lead illiterate, unskilled communities into extreme poverty, driving them to migrate to nearby industrial towns and finally to such desperate measures as selling their children to the mining mafia.

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Kashmir | Photographer: Andy Spyra

Kashmir | Photographer: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Emerging photographer Andy Spyra (1984, Germany) is currently focusing on two personal, long-term projects in the Kashmir Valley, the location of the longest unresolved conflict in the history of the United Nations. Today, over 700,000 Indian soldiers and paramilitary forces are stationed in the region. This makes Kashmir the most highly militarised zone in the world.

Kashmir is not poor: unlike the rest of India it is rich in natural resources and most of its population has (by Indian standards) a good standard of living. But rising militancy, which began in the early 1990s, changed the valley’s fate and turned it into the so-called ‘Valley of Tears’. Before the partition of British India into the now archenemies India and Pakistan, Muslim Kashmir was an independent kingdom with its own culture and language. Nowadays, the people living in the region still feel more Kashmiri than they do Indian: they don’t want to belong to India, which is geographically, ethnologically and culturally so far removed from their own roots.

The Kashmir conflict has already lead to four wars in 1948, 1965, 1971 and 1999, and  resulted in the death of over 60,000 people, with a further 10,000 still missing. Although there have been marked improvements in bilateral relations between India and Pakistan in the past, the situation in Kashmir remains fragile and tense.

 

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Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders

Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In 2000 I was travelling through Russia and other parts of the former Soviet Union developing a project on the transmission of HIV through intravenous drug use. I stumbled upon a group of young kids who were being chased from a McDonalds restaurant by a very aggressive restaurant manager. I intervened to prevent the manager beating the kids on the street. The kids had been removing leftovers from empty tables. This act led me into an underground world where young children live and die in the most squalid and horrible conditions I have ever experienced. Orphans, runaways, wee broken souls fending for themselves in a cruel and unforgiving world.- David Gillanders

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Shadows In Greece | Photojournalist: ENRI CANAJ

Shadows In Greece | Photojournalist: ENRI CANAJ | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The centre of Athens, as I first remember it, was full of life. During the period before the Olympic Games, there was great development. New hotels appeared in order to host the visitors, shops, restaurants and cafes kept sprouting out, it was full of people everywhere. All this happened within a few years. It was as if the city put on new clothes. During the days of the Olympics, the city was clean and well-guarded. You would not see street-merchants, drug-addicts or immigrants, just tourists and people who came in order to have a good time. In my eyes, it looked like another place. As time passed, the city started deteriorating and gradually recovered its previous character. Time passes fast.

 

The city is now fading. Some people abandon it due to the crisis. Many shops and hotels have shut down,  the centre is now almost deserted. People fear they will get ripped-off, they hear that this happens all the time.They even fear seeing all the poverty and destitution, they drug-users who will rip you off for their shot, the women prostituting themselves. But for me, those people were always there. I found them all there when I first arrived as a 9-year old child. They were always there when I was growing up. They are somehow trapped in their lives.  The immigrants live in small rooms that they rent, many of them together, without much hope.

 

The women prostitute themselves even in the streets for 5€. Yet, hanging around with them has been my daily routine. This way, it was easier to approach them. They are sensitive people with a lot of problems, with ruined families behind them. Sometimes they give the impression that no one has cared for them. As if they want someone to talk to, as if they want to get out of the misery they are in. For some of them I had the sense that they were almost looking for someone to open up to and take it all out. Like confessing. What made an impression on me was that they often opened up and talked as if they knew me. I would only shoot when I sensed that they were more comfortable, after some time had passed. The images I have selected are stronger for me, because I know the story behind them. - 

ENRI CANAJ

Photo report's insight:

Photographer Enri Canaj documents the heart-wrenching decline of a once-prosperous city in his series 'Shadows of Greece.' Plagued by poverty, crime, sex trafficking and the political protests of fascist and anti-fascist groups, Athens no longer offers its citizens a safe environment. Canaj, who migrated to Athens at age 11, takes a special interest in the city's immigrant populace and the agonizing conditions and treatment they are subject to.

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Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"The Narmada River project created by the Indian Government involves the construction of 30 large, 135 medium and 3000 small dams to harness the waters of the Narmada river and its tributaries. The proponents of the dam claim that this plan would provide large amounts of water and electricity which are required for development purposes. Opponent of the dam question the basic assumptions of the Narmada Valley Development Plan and believe that its plan is unjust and inequitable…" - Samuel Aranda

Photo report's insight:

Aranda began to work as a photographer for newspapers El País and El Periódico de Catalunya at the age of 19. Two years later he traveled to the Middle East, where he covered the Israeli–Palestinian conflict for the Spanish news agency EFE.

In 2004 Aranda begun working for AFP, covering stories in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The photojournalist association ANIGP-TV awarded Arandas feature documentary about African immigrants trying to reach Europe with the Spanish National Award of Photography. Since 2006 he is working as a freelance photojournalist.

In 2011 Aranda covered the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen. In February 2012 he was awarded the World Press Photo of the Year 2011. The winning picture shows an a woman embracing her son, wounded during clashes against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen, part of the Arab Spring.

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One of the most touching images in history | Photojournalist: Joe O'Donnell

One of the most touching images in history | Photojournalist: Joe O'Donnell | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Stoic Japanese Orphan, Standing At Attention Having Brought His Dead Younger Brother To A Cremation Pyre, Nagasaki, By American Photographer, Joe O’Donnell 1945"

 

Although his name is unknown, we know a lot about him. The child was about 10 years old and survived the crash. Unfortunately, as a result of an air raid killed all his loved ones. Orphaned boy, survived along with his younger brother, which he wore tied back. The child had bowed his head and seemed to be very strongly sleep. His older brother, erect, without shoes and with a straight face, he came to the vicinity of the funeral pile on which the corpses were burned victims.

 

He stood there a few minutes, when finally went to him the man in the white mask, which is responsible for burning the bodies. The silence began to take off attached to the back of the boy child. He grabbed them by the arms and legs and put on the stack. Boy's little brother was already dead.

 

That direction by a photo of Joe O'Donnell's situation, a photographer working for the U.S. Marines. When in 1945 he was sent to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by documenting the bombing and the U.S. occupation, he was only 23 years old. The air raid destroyed cities nearby spent up to 6 months. Those events permanently etched in his memory.

 

O'Donnell saw the whole situation and observed the behavior of the boy who brought his brother to burn his body. When the child was buried at the stake, the boy stood still and watched the flames. His face remained impassive, but you could see that little hero biting his lower lip so hard that it started to bleed. Then he turned and walked away in silence.

Photo report's insight:

Joseph (Joe) Roger O'Donnell (May 7, 1922 – August 9, 2007) was an American documentarian, photojournalist and a photographer for the United States Information Agency. Born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, his most famous work was documenting photographically the immediate aftermath of the atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945 and 1946 as a Marine photographer. He died in Nashville, Tennessee.

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Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda

Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Arab al-Jahalin is the biggest bedouin community that lives in the West Bank Area called E-1, part of the Area C, where Israel retains control over security as well as planning and zoning, and holds strategic significance for further expansion of illegal Israeli settlements.


The bedouins live in miserable shacks, without electricity or running water, grazing their sheeps between debris and dreaming of the flourishing desert of Beersheva, where they have been forcefully evicted, across the 1949 armistice lines by Israeli authorities. In the last 15 years the Bedouin communities have been subject to demolition, requisition of cattle, attacks by settlers, aimed to get away from the area.


But despite this, the communities have shown determination and unbelievable resilience, who led the Israeli military authorities to draw up a "plan of relocation" which ignore the aspirations, needs, traditions and the system of relations inherent in the Bedouin culture. The plan provides the deportation and a forced establishment of the Jahalin tribe next to the rubbish dump of Abu Dis. - Giuliano Camarda

Photo report's insight:

Giuliano Camarda is a freelance photographer since 2008.
He has worked in Bosnia Herzegovina developing several issues about the war aftermath. Actually he's working in the Occupied Palestinian Territories on a long term project. Mainly focused on projects with social and humanitarian aspects. He collaborated with NGOs such as CESVI, Caritas Italiana, La Carovana del sorriso, Vento di Terra. His works have been published on National Geographic Italia, Repubblica.it, Sky TG24, Foreign Policy, ABC News, Donna Moderna, Witness Journal,

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Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala

Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Democratic Republic of Congo has the dubious honour of holding two records. The first, paradoxically, comes from a natural blessing: it is the country on the African continent with the largest mineral wealth. But the gold, diamonds and Coltan (colombo-tantalite ore) have been and are an active part of the civil conflict in which Congo is submerged. The second is that it is the country with the largest number of victims from armed conflict since the Second World War. An estimated 4-5 million human beings have died because of the civil war since 1996.

 

The Rwanda genocide in 1994–which killed close to one million people, mostly Tutsis and moderate Hutus–created ideal conditions in the eastern Congo for horror, death and destruction. Since the end of the genocide, the Rwandan Tutsi troops have maintained an active role in the region: they organize and arm local pro-Tutsi guerrillas like the CNDP (French: Congrès National pour la Défense du Peuple) under the justification that Hutu militias...- Álvaro Ybarra Zavala 

 

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The July War | Photojournalist: Timothy Fadek

The July War | Photojournalist: Timothy Fadek | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

With the firestorm coming from the Rathergate crowd, and doubts now spreading from the left wingabout images from Lebanon, it can start to feel like all reason is being subsumed by political hysteria.  At the same time, war photojournalism seems at risk of being tarred with one brush.

I spent about a half-hour on the phone this evening with photojournalist and contributer Tim Fadek, who has been in Lebanon for about three weeks covering the war.

 

Having been present following the Qana air strike, Tim emphasized that there was no parading or manipulation of bodies, and that the scene was not staged in any way.  That said, Tim took pains to explain how this kind of situation carries with it certain cultural practices and emotional responses that don’t transfer well to the West.  This seems especially true right now, in the super-heated and intensely polarized political environment in the U.S.

"When there is senseless death in this part of the world," Tim explains, "it is completely normal to display the bodies.  Whether in plastic or on blankets, it’s done whether there are photographers there or not.  The idea is to ready the public for what has happened, and also say, look what our enemies have done to us."

 

Regarding the images cited as evidence of manipulation, Fadek said: "a finer distinction is being lost in the West.  In Qana, rescue workers did not hold up a baby to set up a shot.  They were not displaying them to the media, per se.  Yes, it was not lost on these men that the cameras presented a window to the world.  But these people were doing wrenching rescue work and they are human beings.  These instances [of holding up babies] were mostly spontaneous and momentary expressions of anger."

Tim also explained the circumstances surrounding his own images.  Although he felt the photo above was more powerful shown this way, he explained that a rescue worker did set down the body, briefly uncovering it for photographers to document.

For those inclined to consider the depictions as manipulated, Fadek also offers the following image, along with the circumstances involved.


Once removed from the collapsed building, these bodies were set on the ground to be taken down a hill.   From this spot to the waiting ambulances was at least a four minute walk.  In this case, the two children were placed on this blanket where photographers had 1 1/2 to to 2 seconds to document them.  Given the distance and the available manpower, the two bodies were placed on the same blanket to save effort.

In each case, Tim’s understanding was that the rescuers were acting in a manner reflecting a normal attitude toward the dead.  "It’s not a manipulation, it’s a cultural distinction," said Fadek.  "It’s the same as at a martyrs funeral, where faces are exposed, and the bodies marched through the streets.  It’s been done for years, media or otherwise."

Photo report's insight:

The July War : Timothy Fadek is an american photographer whose assignment work has been published in Time, Newsweek, The New York Times Magazine, Stern, Le Monde, National Geographic and scores of other publications.

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Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word "karoshi" came into common use around 1990, when Japanese workers began working longer hours in response to competition from overseas and the recession at the time. Despite increased awareness of the dangers of overwork, de-regulation and increased global competition means that Japanese workers are working harder than ever.


About 20 years ago, heart attacks or strokes were a symbol of ‘karoshi’ in Japan. Today, workers are committing suicide. Of the more than 30,000 suicides recorded 2009, 10,000 were believed to be related to work, according to data from the national police agency. Suicide triggered by overwork is particularly prevalent among white color workers, also known as “salarymen” in Japan. Salarymen devote long work hours and loyalty to companies in exchange for a life-time of employment and benefits.

 

With the recession of the 1990s and the lifting of a ban on the use of cheap temporary laborers, salarymen increasingly work longer hours because of a shortage of manpower and the fear of losing jobs.

Photo report's insight:

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.
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Benedyct Antifer's curator insight, March 26, 2013 4:39 PM

Travail impressionnant sur une société qui aliène de plus en plus la seule richesse dont elle dispose : les gens qui la compose...

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PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto

PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Article 18 of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Cambodia: “the state will protect the rights of children, particularly the right to life, education, and protection during times of war, in addition to protection against economic and sexual exploitation”.

At present Cambodia has around 14 million inhabitants, a number which has increased favourably in recent years due to the period of relative peace the country has experienced since 1993.  Depending on the time of year, the capital, Phnom Penh, has between two and three million inhabitants.

In a country where 81% of the population gain their livelihood from agriculture, the climate determines everything.  However, the extreme poverty in rural areas, the non-existence of technological farming, climatic instability, etc., are all factors which force the population to emigrate to the city in hope of finding a better life.  Unfortunately, what usually happens in these cases is that life does not become better, but the complete opposite.  Due to the parents’ inability to look after all the family members, Cambodian boys and girls have the tendency to start fending for themselves from a very early age.

 

 In the capital, approximately half the children and teenagers who look after themselves have arrived alone from surrounding provinces, with only a few coins in their pockets.  Some of the children will return to their villages after a few days, weeks, or even months.  Others will spend so long on the street that it becomes impossible to return, simply because they forget who they are and where they come from.  At their roots there is always a completely unstructured family unit, in most cases because of extreme poverty, AIDS, or alcoholism which almost always transforms into domestic violence.

Organised into small groups, the bonds that the children build amongst themselves are strong, deep and sincere; as primitive as the survival instinct itself.  Malnutrition, illness, drug abuse, sexual harassment from tourists, traffic…these are all daily threats that the children face.  Perhaps, above all of those, the lack of affection from society, the feeling of abandonment and the shortage of self-confidence could be seen as the strongest and most pressing threat of all.  Forgotten by their politicians who are immersed in dismantling their country in the shortest possible time, at the moment the only valid option the children have to leave the street is to go through an NGO.  This, however, will never be the solution to the problem.

 

Photo report's insight:

Another link of photo documentary: http://www.fotovisura.com/user/MikeA/view/rue-24-phnom-penh-kampuchea

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THE CRESCENT | Photographer: Paolo Pellegrin

THE CRESCENT | Photographer: Paolo Pellegrin | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Several police officers search a house for an armed suspect.

The area of Rochester, New York, USA, where these pictures were taken is part of the so-called 'Crescent', a moon-shaped area that runs across several city neighborhoods. Crime rates here are significantly higher than the rest of Rochester. The Crescent is home to 27 percent of the city's residents and 80 percent of the city's homicides. The causes of the burst of violence include the lagging upstate economy, a steady migration of residents to the suburbs, and a growing number of abandoned houses prone to become centers of drug sales and use. Rochester also has a school system that performs poorly. People inside the Crescent experience those problems in greater concentration.

Photo report's insight:

ABOUT: 

Paolo Pellegrin was born in 1964 in Rome, Italy. He studied architecture at Sapienza Università di Roma, before moving on to photography at the Istituto Italiano di Fotografia, also in the Italian capital. Between 1991 and 2001, Pellegrin was represented by Agence VU in Paris. In 2001, he became a Magnum Photos nominee, and a full member in 2005. He is a contract photographer for Newsweek magazine in the US and Zeit magazine in Germany.

 

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

CAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark IIISHUTTER SPEED: 1/30 secISO: 6400F-STOP: 2.5FOCAL LENGTH: 50 mm 

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