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Wonderful black and white photography
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Pratiquez le Street Portrait comme Personne | Serge Bouvet, photographe

Pratiquez le Street Portrait comme Personne | Serge Bouvet, photographe | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
La clé du Street Portrait réussie passe par la maîtrise de l’hyperfocale. Pour le Street Portrait ou la Street Photography, je vous recommande de voir large : utilisez un grand angle, une focale comprise ou égale à 28mm et 35mm est l’idéal. Alex Webb, Anders Petersen, Joel Meyerowitz ou David Alan Harvey shootent avec cette focale. Mark Cohen, Bruce Gilden pratique le Street Portrait avec un 28mm. Le grand angle vous offre suffisamment de marge de manœuvre pour attraper dans vos filets la personne que vous photographiez. Le champ trop serré du 50mm est à déconseiller pour le Street Portrait. Il est excellent pour faire de beaux portraits photos mais pas pour shooter des individus de très près et dans le feu de l’action.
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Fashion photographer on Vimeo

My name is Serge Bouvet. I'm photographer from Paris. This short video present my job. Photos & video: Serge Bouvet Models: Yulia Lobova, Katrin Cole,…
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Manifeste pour libérer la photo d’entreprise | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Manifeste pour libérer la photo d’entreprise | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Vous êtes un chef d’entreprise, un leader visionnaire ? Il faut sauter sur l’occasion de montrer des gens singuliers, de vendre aux gens singuliers. Le dilemme est là : continuer à parier sur la masse ou sur l’individu. Croyez-moi, il y a plus d’occasion à saisir en défendant le singulier et en s’en faisant le porte-parole.
Vous souhaitez réaliser des portraits corporate qui sortent un peu des lieux communs, de vrais portraits qui vous ressemblent : éloignez-vous de la normalité et on vous remarquera." 

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Best works | Photographer: ANDERS PETERSEN

Best works | Photographer: ANDERS PETERSEN | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Anders Petersen is noted for his intimate and personal documentary-style black-and-white photographs. He studied photography under Christer Stromholm in Sweden, 1966-1967. In 1967, he started to photograph the late-night regulars (prostitutes, transvestites, drunks, lovers, drug addicts) in a bar in Hamburg, Germany, named Café Lehmitz, and continued that project for three years. His photobook of the same name was published eight years later, in 1978, by Schirmer/Mosel in Germany, and then appeared in France (1979) and Sweden (1982). Café Lehmitz has since become regarded as a seminal book in the history of European photography.One of the photos from this series was later used as the cover art for Tom Waits' 1985 album Rain Dogs.

 

In 1970, he co-founded SAFTRA, the Stockholm group of photographers, with Kenneth Gustavsson. At the same time, he taught at Christer Stromholm's school. He has been director of the Göteborg School of Photography and Film. He began to photograph for magazines, and he continued his personal photo diary work, which continues to this day. He has photographed for extensive periods of time in prisons, mental asylums, and homes for old people.

 

In 1978, Petersen received a grant from the Swedish Authors' Foundation. In 2003, he was elected Photographer of the Year at the Recontres d'Arles. In 2007, he was one of four finalists for the £30,000 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.

Petersen has published more than 20 books, mostly in Sweden, and has had solo and group exhibitions throughout Europe and Asia.

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Sunday Morning Sports | Photographer: Salvi Danes

Sunday Morning Sports | Photographer: Salvi Danes | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Countless photographs have been captured along Brooklyn’s Coney Island and Brighton Beach. From Lisette Model and Weegee’s famous images of bathers on into the present, sun revelers have been an endless source of inspiration to photographers. Spanish photographer Salvi Danés takes us tohis Coney Island in a series he calls Sunday Morning Sports. In one image, a bather descends down jagged rocks into the water, his body engulfed by the textures around him—water, rock, light and body becoming one. The men ofSunday Morning Sports, active and invigorated, are less worried about life than they are about living. We recently caught up with Danés to find out more about this community.


“They are neighbors who have always lived together in “Barceloneta”, a neighborhood in Barcelona. They are acquaintances, friends, even relatives, who since they were teenagers, have spent their time having fun doing exercise outdoors and enjoying the sun that the beach offers them.” - Salvi Danes

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Pierric Chalois's curator insight, February 11, 2014 3:06 AM

Les sportifs du dimanche....

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Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ

Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Albania is a small country in the heart of the Balkans. Despite its rich culture, people outside do generally not know much about it. It is also my homeland, the place of my early childhood. I grew up seperated from it, and returned later to pick up the threads that were left behind. 

What I found was modernity and tradition living together. I traveled a lot and started to know my birthplace, the people, their mentality, and their traditions. I felt very welcome, and was fascinated by all the people I met. They were kind, friendly and curious about my work.

 

I made this journey together with my wife. When people realized we were a couple, they were very open, they welcomed us inside their homes and extended wishes, blessings and congratulations. Marriage is very important in Albania. Everyone has to get married, it is considered to make men stronger and more respected in society.

 

In this photographic project I would like to show the everyday lives of Albanian people – the big picture, as well as the small, seemingly insignificant moments. What impressed me most was the strong family union, the connection among people. I found it everywhere – in married young couples and their babies, at a funeral ceremony where relatives shared their pain, at a wedding party, or when a son accompanied his father at work. I didn’t see any lonely people. - 

ENRI CANAJ
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Industrious | Photographer: Marco Grob

Industrious | Photographer: Marco Grob | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

For its 100th anniversary the construction company Holcim has commissioned a unique artistic memento. Star photographer Marco Grob was invited to photograph the company's workers. The result is a stunning homage to 80,000 employees in 70 countries. With his sensitive yet direct portraits, Marco Grob captures the face of the company. The resulting series of black-and-white photography has great resonance and pays fitting tribute to the New Objective tradition of August Sander and Albert Renger-Patzsch.

Photo report's insight:

Born in Olten, Switzerland, Marco Grob began his career 
as a photographer's assistant in Los Angeles. Upon his return to Switzerland, Marco opened his first studio and worked for twenty years as a still life photographer.

 

 

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Under the skin | Photographer: Maciej Pisuk

Under the skin | Photographer: Maciej Pisuk | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The inhabitants of Warsaw consider Brzeska Street, the very core of North Praga, the most neglected and dangerous district in the city (in my opinion the greatest local problem is stigmatization of the people living in the area). I would like to present you portraits of the street’s residents, my neighbors, acquaintances, friends, people among whom I lived for so many years. The pictures taken in this place constitute the vast majority of my photographic work so far.
I only photograph people who I stay in close touch with. The pictures are a result of the long process where the release of the shutter is essentially an element of little meaning.

 

The protagonists of my photographs possess something unusual: they have faces. I could risk and state that today almost nobody shows their face and there are only a few people who still have them. The face disappears under layers of masks, which are adjusted to the roles that we are forced to play. We change our masks as easily as we change our identities. In public, we only present the image that we shape according to our needs. Our contacts stop being direct. Sometimes we communicate with each other but we are not able to encounter. I like thinking of my pictures as testimonies of the encounters and I count on them to convey a particle of the experience I took part in.

Photo report's insight:

A graduate of the screenwriting course at the State Academy of Film, TV and Theatre in Lodz. Works as a screenwriter. The winner of prizes and awards on Polish and international photography competitions, among others: 2nd Prize at BZ WBK Press Foto 2006 (category: society), 1st Prize at ‘Warsaw Autumn of Photography’ 2007, 1st prize in the category of Photojournalism Non-Pro-People/Personality at PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris 2008 Photo Competition, 2nd prize at BZ WBK Press Foto 2010 (category: portrait), Stockholm Photography Week 2012 – The prize for the best portfolio.
For a few years he has been working on a photographical documentary project concerning the inhabitants of the area of Praga in Warsaw.

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Maiko & Geiko | Photographer: Arif Iqball

Maiko & Geiko | Photographer: Arif Iqball | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Outside Japan there is often a misunderstanding about the role of the Geisha and that misunderstanding comes from different literary and movie interpretations/fictionalization by non-Japanese at different points in history. The difficulty also comes from the inability to recognize/accept that female entertainers can exist in cultures without engaging in any form of sexual entertainment.

 

The historical city of Kyoto, Japan is the true center of this floating world and home to five Kagai (literally flower towns, but specifically, performance districts) where you can see Geishas today. The oldest Kagai dates back to the fifteenth century and the tradition of the Geisha continues in Kyoto in the true manner and spirit as it has historically, where the women take pride in being “women of the mind” versus “women of the body”. By all local/Japanese definitions, these women are living art as well as the pinnacle of Japanese eloquence, good manners, style and elegance and are highly respected in Japanese society as artists. Some of their teachers have been labeled as “Living National Treasures” by the Japanese Government. The “Gei” of the Geisha itself means Art and “sha” means a person. Historically both men and women have been labeled Geisha although that word is seldom used and Geiko and Maiko (Apprentice Geiko) are the more appropriate forms of address.

 

There has been very little work done to photograph the artistic side of the Geiko and Maiko and my work is an effort to see them as living art and to be able to portray them in both formal and informal settings. Behind the painted face is really a teenager/young woman working very hard through song, dance, music, and witty conversation to make the customers of the tea houses escape from their world of stress to a world of art/humour/relaxation and laughter.

Most of this work was done in Medium Format to enable the viewer to eventually see and feel the larger photograph itself as art and I hope that this broader work can shed a new light to the understanding of the Maiko and Geiko and bring respect to them as artists from the non-Japanese viewer.

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Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty

Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Horse racing is a part of Naadam, a Mongolian festival that has been celebrated since the times of Genghis Khan. It is most recently held every July to commemorate the People's Revolution. Traditionally, the jockeys are children in these races. It is said that Mongols learn to ride before they can walk and feel safer on horseback than on the ground. Boys and girls as young as five are used as jockeys because a Naadam race is not a test for riders, but for horses. However, the races can be very dangerous, with hundreds of horses running at great speeds across a steppe of 12 to 28 kilometers. In preparing for Naadam, children take part in repeated practice races and help the trainers take care of the racehorses. According to some estimates, 150 to 180 thousand horses with more than 30 thousand child jockeys compete in over 500 races each year.

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A Tale of Two Slums | Photographer: Stephen Dupont

A Tale of Two Slums | Photographer: Stephen Dupont | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

There are two excellent photographic essays of Polaroids made in the Mumbai slum Dharavi and the Senen slum of Jakarta by Stephen Dupont, an Australian photographer.

Dharavi is one of the world's largest slum and lies on prime real estate in the middle of India's financial capital, Mumbai and has a population estimated to be 1 million. Many businesses flourish in this slum, such as traditional pottery and textiles, a recycling industry, which generate an estimated $650 million turnover a year.

As for the Senen slum, it's a trackside slum in central Jakarta. It's also a center for recycling, and its inhabitants live cheek to jowl with the thundering trains.

  Stephen Dupont has produced a photographs of fragile cultures and marginalized peoples, which capture the human dignity of his subjects, and do so with great intimacy and often in some of the world’s most dangerous regions. His work has earned him prestigious prizes, including a Robert Capa Gold Medal citation from the Overseas Press Club of America; a Bayeux War Correspondent’s Prize; and first places in the World Press Photo, Pictures of the Year International, the Australian Walkleys, and Leica/CCP Documentary Award.

His work has been featured in The New Yorker, Aperture, Newsweek, Time, GQ, Esquire, French and German GEO, Le Figaro, Liberation, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Independent, The Guardian, The New York Times Magazine, Stern, The Australian Financial Review Magazine, and Vanity Fair.

He has held major exhibitions in London, Paris, New York, Sydney, Canberra, Tokyo, and Shanghai, and at Perpignan’s Visa Pour L’Image, China’s Ping Yao and Holland’s Noorderlicht festivals.


A Tale of Two Slums Part I: 

http://stephendupont.squarespace.com/essays/a-tale-of-two-slums-part-i

A Tale of Two Slums Part II:

http://stephendupont.squarespace.com/essays/a-tale-of-two-slums-part-ii

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Pooja Singh's comment, October 23, 2013 8:50 AM
Our homes and dreams are being taken away from us: Campa Cola Compound Story - The Facts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZsivIMNiOY Show your support by sharing the video and by signing a petition onhttp://bit.ly/savecampacola
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To photograph through the wall of the Franklin Tower | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

To photograph through the wall of the Franklin Tower | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"17th Floor, Flanklin Tower, La Defense. With E-TTL radio triggers, it is possible to set the slave flash regardless of master flash placement . Even better, it overcomes the obstacles to a maximum distance of 15 meters. Since I purchased these toys, I experience fanciful shots to measure its potential. I decided, then, to photograph a consultant through the wall of Franklin Tower."

(Serge Bouvet, photographer, Paris)

 

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Tintype Portraits | Keliy Anderson-Staley: Photography

Tintype Portraits | Keliy Anderson-Staley: Photography | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Keliy Anderson-Staley is a fine art photographer using the wet plate collodion process to shoot tintype and ambrotype portraits and landscapes.

 

They loom out of the darkness, as if hovering uncertainly between past and present, offering themselves for our scrutiny with an intensity that borders on the confrontational. Part of it is the look these people give us, staring at the camera for as long as sixty seconds and more, resulting in a kind of clenching of the eyes (as a sitter, you become aware of the sheer physicality of looking under these conditions, of the need to fight your eyes’ desire to wander). Part of it is the texture of their skin, turned into rugged planetary surfaces by the tintype’s peculiar response to color and high resolution of detail. And part of it is the differential focus with which the subjects are depicted—sharp in some places and strangely liquid in others—as if their bodies are floating in a primordial wet world with just the faces breaking the surface. For all these reasons, Keliy Anderson-Staley’s tintype portraits are best described as other worldly, rather than antiquarian.

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Tokyo in Black and White | Photographer: Tatsuo Suzuki

Tokyo in Black and White | Photographer: Tatsuo Suzuki | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Japanese photographer Tatsuo Suzuki captures the frenetic atmosphere of Tokyo through richly toned black and white street photography. Suzuki’s use of long exposures and high contrast serve to emphasize the overwhelming experience of navigating a massive urban environment. Suzuki’s subjects show a fascinating mix of exhaustion and frantic energy. Some are pictured hurrying past, while others lay passed out in subway seats, clutching their purses. Technology is another interesting element in Suzuki’s images as people focus intently on their phones; seemingly unaware of the city humming around them. 

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L'intuition dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet

L'intuition dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"J’ai encore présent à l’esprit de nombreuses gravures illustrées de John Tenniel, de Cornelis Visscher, d’Émile Bayard, de Léon Benett, de Gustave Doré ou de Thomas Johnson. Je dois beaucoup à ces illustrateurs qui m’ont rendu avide des écrits de Jules Vernes, de Jean de La Fontaine ou de Miguel De Cervantès. Par ailleurs, il m’ont donné le goût des récits d’aventures, d’histoire et de documentaires anciens comme le Petit Journal par exemple.

Les illustrations ont fait entrer dans ma caboche des dizaines de récits visuels sans trop d’effort. C’est la force des images, n’est-ce pas ? Les images font entrer les idées essentielles dans l’esprit avec une grande aisance. Pour l’enfant que j’étais, ce moyen pour retenir certaines choses me convenaient parfaitement. Une cascade de mots ou de chiffres, c’est parfois trop abstrait pour l’imagination. L’image s’efface difficilement de la mémoire." - Serge Bouvet

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Taso's curator insight, November 17, 2014 3:37 PM

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Emily NEYROUD's curator insight, November 24, 2014 9:29 AM

ajouter votre aperçu ...

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I Am Georgia | Photographer: Dina Oganova

I Am Georgia |  Photographer: Dina Oganova | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

For photographer Dina Oganova, each and every aspect of her country is precious and unique. In her series I Am Georgia, Oganova chronicles the daily facets of the homeland she has always treasured. Here we see children at play, the elderly at prayer, and everyday familial celebrations.


Made up of only four million residents, Georgia has existed as a sovereign state for a little over a decade. Bordered by Russia, Turkey and the Black Sea, the country faced civil war the same year it declared independence from the Soviet Union.


A land of refugees and with a history of conflict, Georgia’s people attempt to hold on to traditions while plunging into the future. In this relatively new and foreign landscape, I Am Georgia is a personal and spirited testament to who the country is and to who it is becoming.

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Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold

Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

A body, used as a canvas, every inch of skin filled with sacred text and figures of mythical creatures, all forming a protective shield. A boxer, a monk, a construction worker, a police man, a soldier, a taxi driver, a shipyard worker, a shaman, a tattoo master; men, women and their inked protection from evil spirits and bad luck. Enter the world of Thailand’s spiritual “yantra” tattoo tradition. - Cedric Arnold

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Bangkok | Photographer: Jacob Aue Sobol

Bangkok | Photographer: Jacob Aue Sobol | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I came to Bangkok for the first time in the spring of 2008. It is a city that has one of the fastest growing economies in Asia, yet it is also a place where the gap between the poor and the rich is increasing rapidly.    

I found my interest in the sois, the narrow streets, which surround the muddy River of Chao Phraya, the street kids in Sukhumvit and the families who live by the old train track that runs through the slum of Klong Toey. This, as opposed to the fancy shopping area around Siam Square, is where people caught my attention - people I felt a connection with or an attraction towards, and who were willing to communicate with me or just share a brief moment of closeness. 

However, I could also often feel the distance between us, and so I often found myself in the role as the spectator photographing the constantly changing scenarios in the city. Underlined by the difference in language, race and social status, it was a continuous struggle to create an equal meeting. But when this succeeded, it was often in this encounter – on a one to one basis - that I got the feeling of the closeness and intimacy I was searching for.  - Jacob Aue Sobol

Photo report's insight:
Jacob is a member of Magnum Photos. Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, Rita Castelotte Gallery in Madrid and RTR Gallery in Paris also represent him. Jacob was born in Denmark, in 1976 and grew up in Brøndby Strand in the suburbs south of Copenhagen. He lived as an exchange student in Strathroy, Canada from 1994-95 and as a hunter and fisherman in Tiniteqilaaq, Greenland from 2000-2002. In Spring 2006 he moved to Tokyo, staying there 18 months before returning to Denmark in August 2008. He now lives and works in Copenhagen.
 
After studying at the European Film College, Jacob was admitted to Fatamorgana, the Danish School of Documentary and Art Photography in 1998. There he developed a unique, expressive style of black-and-white photography, which he has since refined and further developed. In the autumn of 1999 he went to live in the settlement Tiniteqilaaq on the East Coast of Greenland. Over the next three years he lived mainly in this township with his Greenlandic girlfriend Sabine and her family, living the life of a fisherman and hunter but also photographing. The resultant book Sabine was published in 2004 and the work was nominated for the 2005 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.

In the summer of 2005 Jacob traveled with a film crew to Guatemala to make a documentary about a young Mayan girl’s first journey to the ocean. The following year he returned by himself to the mountains of Guatemala where he met the indigenous family Gomez-Brito. He stayed with them for a month to tell the story of their everyday life. The series won the First Prize Award, Daily Life Stories, World Press Photo 2006. In 2006 he moved to Tokyo and during the next two years he created the images from his resent book I, Tokyo. The book was awarded the Leica European Publishers Award 2008 and published by Actes Sud (France), Apeiron (Greece), Dewi Lewis Publishing (Great Britain), Edition Braus (Germany), Lunwerg Editores (Spain), Peliti Associati (Italy) and Mets & Schilt (The Netherlands) In 2008 Jacob started working in Bangkok and in 2009 in Copenhagen. Both projects will be published as books in 2013. Jacob is currently working on the project Arrivals and Departures - a journey from Moscow to Beijing - in co-operation with Leica Camera.  
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Ten Thousand Scrolls | Photographer: Kirk Crippens

Ten Thousand Scrolls | Photographer: Kirk Crippens | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
“Traveling ten thousand miles is better than reading ten thousand scrolls” is a Chinese proverb that speaks to the heart of Kirk Crippens’ recent portrait project. He was hungry for knowledge of China that he couldn’t get just by reading, so he traveled from his home in the East Bay area to the small city Chinese city of Lishui. With just two words of Mandarin (Ni hao, which means “hello”), he managed to meet hundreds of people who allowed him to photograph them and who took him into their homes and into their confidence. Crippens is one of three photographers (along with Maggie Preston and David Wolf) participating in the 2012 RayKo artists-in-residence program. A joint exhibition is currently on view at the RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco through December 14th, 2012.
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Qajar | Photographer: Shadi Ghadirian

Qajar | Photographer: Shadi Ghadirian | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Her Qajar Series (1998-2001) consists of small studio portraits of women dressed in the nineteenth-century Qajar style. Many of the women photographed are Ghadirian's friends and family. The backgrounds of these portraits resemble those found in photographic studios of that period. However, the artist has added some modern anomalies or dissonances, such as a mountain bike, a newspaper, or a Pepsi-Cola can. Ghadirian plays with these juxtapositions and contrasts, thus expressing the difficulties women face in Iran today - torn between tradition and the modernity of globalization. These composed portraits depict women unsure to which era they belong.

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The Jangs | Photographer: Michael Jang

The Jangs | Photographer: Michael Jang | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

This time, I see intimate and hilarious shots of Michael's own extended family, taken in California in the 1970s while he was a student at Cal Arts. These pictures are far from your average family snapshots; in fact, they were just purchased by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 

Photo report's insight:

Michael Jang is an established photographer who has always had an eye for recognizing and capturing the defining moments of his generation. Well known for his commercial photography and portraiture of notable figures from the 70s and 80s, such as William Burroughs, Alice Walker, Jimi Hendrix, Frank Sinatra, and many others, Jang’s work is now being looked at in a new light. These photos can be found in Jang's book, Summer Weather, which was released last May from Owl & Tiger Books.

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War and Peace | Photographer: Melissa Cacciola

War and Peace | Photographer: Melissa Cacciola | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

War and Peace presents forty-eight tintype portraits of active duty military and veterans from the Army, Navy, Air Force, Coast Guard, and Marines as a kind of confessional before the camera. Fifteen men and nine women of various backgrounds, ages, and roles in the armed forces have been photographed in uniform and civilian attire in an exploration of war, identity, and what serving in the armed forces means.

 

These double portraits contrast each individual and his or her role in the military against his or her identity in a contemporary world that is constantly shifting culturally and politically. A chef, an infantry rifleman, an explosive ordinance device disabler, and a fuel carrier are just a few of the diverse individuals represented. Through the photographic lens, we can study just how the airman in his dress blues relates to the man in the Guns N’ Roses t-shirt. 


War and Peacemakes visible the present-day faces of those in service, a cross-section of our society that we may not often have the chance to see. Through the tintype, our humanity—epic and small—becomes transfixed by the intrinsic characteristics of one of the earliest photographic processes in our history.

Photo report's insight:

Tintype, also melainotype and ferrotype, is a photograph made by creating a direct positive on a sheet of iron metal that is blackened by painting, lacquering or enamelling and is used as a support for a collodion photographic emulsion. Photographers usually worked outside at fairs, carnivals etc. and as the support of the tintype (there is no actual tin used) is resilient and does not need drying, photographs can be produced only a few minutes after the picture is taken.

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Golden Eagle Nomads | Photographer: John Delaney

Golden Eagle Nomads | Photographer: John Delaney | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it


"Nobody knows exactly when the Kazakhs tamed the Golden Eagle of Central Asia. 
Herodotus refers to nomadic eagle hunters in 5th Century B.C. Marco Polo wrote about the Kazakhs in his epic “Travels” account. The name “Kazakh” dates as far back as the 13th century, meaning “independent”, “free” and “nomadic”. These terms perfectly define this legendary people, so famous for their pride and skills on the battlefield. Genghis Khan is said to have had over 5000 "eagle riders" in his personal guard. We do know that since the 15th Century, nomadic Kazakh tribes on horseback, with eagles alert at their sides, have roamed freely across the borders of what is today Russia, China, Kazakhstan and Western Mongolia. 

Now at the dawn of the 21st Century, the nomadic way of life is fragile and in danger of being eradicated. History has long threatened these legendary horsemen. The Bolshevik Revolution, Stalin's purges and China's cultural revolution drove the roaming Kazakhs to the mountains and valleys of Mongolia, where they have found refuge and the freedom to live as they have for centuries. But even now in this remote area globalization and the encroachment of the West may irreversibly change the eagle riders' way of life."


-John Delaney

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The Masai Typology | Travel photographer: Nicolas Lotsos

The Masai Typology | Travel photographer: Nicolas Lotsos | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
The Masai Typology is one of the many gorgeous photo galleries of Africa by photographer Nicolas Lotsos. I'm not much of an African wildlife aficionado, but his fine art galleries of photographs of the handsome Masai, of Zanzibar, or of the African slums and townships are lovely exemplars of monochromatic imagery. Nicolas Lotsos is  a fine art photographer (and in my view, a travel photographer as well) and a basketball agent. He co-runs a sports agency representing some of the top sports figures in Europe. He has been a photographer since he was 16 years old, and specializes in photographs of wild life and nature.

 

He also won an impressive number of awards, to include Gold Winner at the 2012 Grand Prix de la Photographie, Outstanding Achievement at the Spider Award 2012, the 2012 Veolia Wildlife Photographer Award, including two awards by the Travel Photographer Of The Year (TPOTY), amongst others.

A Nilotic group in East Africa, next to the Indian Ocean, the Masai society is patriarchal, and elder men decide most major matters for each group. A full body of oral law covers many aspects of behaviour. The Masai are monotheistic, worshipping a single deity.

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Target Unknown | Photographer: Stacy Kranitz

Target Unknown | Photographer: Stacy Kranitz | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Once a year in Pennsylvania, 500 people come together to reenact the Battle of the Bulge. During the reenactment, I portray Leni Riefenstahl and behave with soldiers, as she would have. Rather than seek out a simple role model who fit a classic heroine profile, I became intrigued by the complex story of a woman I could both love and hate. In Riefenstahl, I found a multidimensional character with a focused vision and a murky set of morals. These grey areas spoke to my desire to understand people beyond the constraints of good versus evil. This experience allows me to reflect upon atrocity, delve into my own relationship with my Jewish heritage, and contemplate the camera's ability to re-imagine history. "

 

"I have inserted myself into the Nazi reenactor photographs in an effort to subvert the viewer’s instinct to dismiss these people as different from themselves. I believe that the grey areas between ethical imperatives may offer new potential to understand and relate to a subject.
Much of our conception of history is based on images. The reenactors base the authenticity of their looks on images and, in particular, on Riefenstahl’s film Triumph of the Will. Historical images have been filtered through media and propaganda. These images become history as generations pass, memories fade. Photographs and film become the dominant forces that shape the public imagination. My newly created images of the reenactment are part of the deconstruction process by which images first represent and then replace history."

(Stacy Kranitz : http://stacykranitzprojects.com/targetunknown)

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