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Then the sky crashed down upon us | Photographer: Annalisa Natali Murri 

Then the sky crashed down upon us | Photographer: Annalisa Natali Murri  | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
“Give me water, I beg you – give me water – I heard a girl near me imploring for water – We were a few blocked under the ruins. Some of us died, I’ve seen them dying. It had been about three days since the collapse, we were still trapped there. We didn’t know if we would all have died down there. Then I saw the girl trying to bite the neck of a corpse at her side, with her last strength, to suck and drink its blood. I have no words to describe what I saw. When I was rescued, after 4 days, she was dead”. Imran Hossain, 48, sewing operator for Phantom Apparels at the 3rd floor of Rana Plaza, tries to bring his mind back to last year, April 24th, when everything changed for him and nearly other 2500 survivors. One year has passed after the accident, but that hell keep reliving relentlessly in the memory of those who entered the building that black morning. The trauma is overwhelming and is having a long-term impact on psychological well-being of these people. 

Still hundreds of people suffer from invisible, intangibles wounds. Many are no longer able to sleep at night nor can hear the slightest noise. Many others suffer panic attacks, memory losses, hear continuously mourning voices imploring help or even see dead workers laying beside them. The tragedy and pain are far from over. The intention of the project was hence to draw out the invisible, psychological aftermath of the disaster, focusing on PTSD affectd victims and their struggle to conduct a normal life. Portraits of survivors, relatives of the victims and rescue workers try to give shape to their fears and memories in a chaotic and disorienting merge of their own ghosts, derived from the trauma, which everyday and night threaten their minds.

Annalisa Natali Murri (1982), freelance photographer, approached for the first time to photography at age 27, while attending Architectural and Urban Photography School in Valencia (Spain). After completing her studies in engineering, soon she began to alternate her work to photography, focusing on personal research works and documentary projects, mainly inspired by social issues and their psychological consequences. Her works have been awarded in several international contests, including 70th and 71st POYi. In 2014 she was selected as an attendee for LOOKbetween mentorship program. She’s currently based in Bologna, Italy.
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Kashmir | Photographer: Andy Spyra

Kashmir | Photographer: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Emerging photographer Andy Spyra (1984, Germany) is currently focusing on two personal, long-term projects in the Kashmir Valley, the location of the longest unresolved conflict in the history of the United Nations. Today, over 700,000 Indian soldiers and paramilitary forces are stationed in the region. This makes Kashmir the most highly militarised zone in the world.

Kashmir is not poor: unlike the rest of India it is rich in natural resources and most of its population has (by Indian standards) a good standard of living. But rising militancy, which began in the early 1990s, changed the valley’s fate and turned it into the so-called ‘Valley of Tears’. Before the partition of British India into the now archenemies India and Pakistan, Muslim Kashmir was an independent kingdom with its own culture and language. Nowadays, the people living in the region still feel more Kashmiri than they do Indian: they don’t want to belong to India, which is geographically, ethnologically and culturally so far removed from their own roots.

The Kashmir conflict has already lead to four wars in 1948, 1965, 1971 and 1999, and  resulted in the death of over 60,000 people, with a further 10,000 still missing. Although there have been marked improvements in bilateral relations between India and Pakistan in the past, the situation in Kashmir remains fragile and tense.

 

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Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders

Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In 2000 I was travelling through Russia and other parts of the former Soviet Union developing a project on the transmission of HIV through intravenous drug use. I stumbled upon a group of young kids who were being chased from a McDonalds restaurant by a very aggressive restaurant manager. I intervened to prevent the manager beating the kids on the street. The kids had been removing leftovers from empty tables. This act led me into an underground world where young children live and die in the most squalid and horrible conditions I have ever experienced. Orphans, runaways, wee broken souls fending for themselves in a cruel and unforgiving world.- David Gillanders

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The 2006 Lebanon War | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

The 2006 Lebanon War | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Samuel Aranda Phototographer
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"The 2006 Lebanon War – know in Lebanon as the July War, and in Israel as the Second Lebanon War – was a 34-day military conflict un Lebanon and norther Israel between Israel and Hezbollah.

The conflict left hundreds of dead and thousands of displaced. Whole families lost everything during the war." - Samuel Aranda

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Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda

Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Arab al-Jahalin is the biggest bedouin community that lives in the West Bank Area called E-1, part of the Area C, where Israel retains control over security as well as planning and zoning, and holds strategic significance for further expansion of illegal Israeli settlements.


The bedouins live in miserable shacks, without electricity or running water, grazing their sheeps between debris and dreaming of the flourishing desert of Beersheva, where they have been forcefully evicted, across the 1949 armistice lines by Israeli authorities. In the last 15 years the Bedouin communities have been subject to demolition, requisition of cattle, attacks by settlers, aimed to get away from the area.


But despite this, the communities have shown determination and unbelievable resilience, who led the Israeli military authorities to draw up a "plan of relocation" which ignore the aspirations, needs, traditions and the system of relations inherent in the Bedouin culture. The plan provides the deportation and a forced establishment of the Jahalin tribe next to the rubbish dump of Abu Dis. - Giuliano Camarda

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Giuliano Camarda is a freelance photographer since 2008.
He has worked in Bosnia Herzegovina developing several issues about the war aftermath. Actually he's working in the Occupied Palestinian Territories on a long term project. Mainly focused on projects with social and humanitarian aspects. He collaborated with NGOs such as CESVI, Caritas Italiana, La Carovana del sorriso, Vento di Terra. His works have been published on National Geographic Italia, Repubblica.it, Sky TG24, Foreign Policy, ABC News, Donna Moderna, Witness Journal,

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Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet,

Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet, | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Où vont tous ces pauvres indiens chaque jour que fait Shiva ?
Ces miséreux au mauvais karma, que la faim autant que le travail maigrit ?
Où vont donc ces mioches qu’on voit errer seul avec un seau ou un bac de pierre sur la tête? Où vont donc ces femmes voilées dans leur saris rouges où survit encore un sourire.
Ils s’en vont tous bosser comme des forçats, comme des esclaves.
Ils vont, dès potron-minet répéter leurs mouvements en silence ou en chantonnant.
Accroupis sur la caillasse presque de braise, ils se préparent pour l'enfer.
Et la misère les mâche au soleil." - Serge Bouvet

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Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra

Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I first came to Kashmir in the early spring of 2007 at the end of a motorcycle trip across India and I fell in love with the people, the light, and the atmosphere of this remote place. But as much as I love it, the political situation of the valley continues to bring disorder and conflict. 

Currently there are two conflicts in Kashmir, and each is tightly woven into the other: The more known conflict is the international, atomically loaded border dispute between India and its archenemy, Pakistan, regarding the affiliation of Kashmir between the two states. The other, less known one, is the inner-Kashmiri conflict on the Indian side of the border (which is two- thirds of the complete territory), where the people struggle for independence from India.  I have spent the last two years documenting this conflict, most recently in the summer of 2009 when I spent two months on the Indian side.

I attended meetings of parents who have had children disappear without leaving a note or ever coming back. I was invited into homes where family members mourned the rape and murder of two young girls by paramilitary forces.  I photographed a family whose sons were shot during one of the countless demonstrations.  These experiences didn‘t differ from my last two trips to Kashmir - the political and social climate remained the same as it was when I left the region half a year prior. The slogans were also the same during the countless demonstrations against the Indian army, the symbol of the occupation of what the Kashmiris call their soil: “Ham ka chate? Azadi!"- "What do we want? Freedom!" 

Looking over the sixty-year history of this conflict, it seems highly unlikely that the people of Kashmir will gain independence in the foreseeable future and that the world will see an independent Kashmir again. This strategic region is too important for either nation to ever let it go.- Andy Spyra

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CAPITOLIO | Photographer: Christopher Anderson

CAPITOLIO | Photographer: Christopher Anderson | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word ‘capitolio’ refers to the domed building that houses a government. Here, the city of Caracas, Venezuela, is itself a metaphorical capitolio building. The decaying Modernist architecture, with a jungle growing through the cracks, becomes the walls of this building and the violent streets become the corridors where the human drama plays itself out in what President Hugo Chavez called a ‘revolution.’

Originally published as a traditional book in 2010 by RM, “Capitolio” is an intimate journey through a time of revolution in Hugo Chavez’ Caracas, Venezuela. This series was photographed between 2004 and 2008.

 

Photo report's insight:

Christopher Anderson is a photographer and member of the Magnum Photos agency

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Ioan Tasi's comment, May 13, 2013 8:12 AM
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The Disabled | Photojournalist: Ohm Phanphiroj

The Disabled | Photojournalist: Ohm Phanphiroj | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In Thailand, disabled individuals can be seen everywhere in the form of beggars, traveling the streets in Bangkok and asking for money. There are no laws intended to provide and improve the quality of life for these people. Roads, sidewalks, walkways are never equipped or adjusted to provide for wheelchairs or the blind. These unfortunate souls are considered a problem rather than as sharing in equal rights and status. They are looked down upon, although with a certain amount of sympathy. There are only a few facilities and organizations created to support and house them. Likewise, the budgets set aside for these places are minimal at best. Meager at worst.

 

The Disabled project is driven by the curiosity to understand how the disabled lives, functions and survives on a daily basis. In my search to learn more, I went to a male disabled rehabilitation and housing center on the outskirts of Bangkok. There the haunting and, at times, graphic images of an overburdened and failed care system can be seen. The place is both vastly under staffed and under budgeted, and the ratio of caregivers to patients is 1:40 or 50. Most of the patients living there have been abandoned by their families, not by choice but because their family has no means to take care of them, so subsequently they are brought to the center to be taken care of.

 

Patients are seen sleeping on the pavement out in the sun, tied to a secure pole or to a bed. The quality of the place is sub-standard, despite the good intentions of the few staffers who work there, with the condition of each patient varying, from physical to mental, to, in many cases, both.

It is my sincere desire to document the condition of the center along with the treatment of its patients. The images I have captured thus far are harrowing, haunting and very visceral. The feelings of loneliness and emptiness are prominent. I want to create a visual commentary that conveys these feelings along with the utter sense of despair and isolation I felt for the place and its patients.

 

With this project, I hope to help bridge the gap between those in need in our society and society itself. I wish to raise awareness and bring needed attention and better understanding of the existing conditions and to improve the quality of life for these people. I want to capture hope for the hopeless and dream for the few dreams the disabled have left. The project is my very personal and privileged journey into a space most do not care to venture, or simply refuse to acknowledge.- Ohm Phanphiroj

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THE CRESCENT | Photographer: Paolo Pellegrin

THE CRESCENT | Photographer: Paolo Pellegrin | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Several police officers search a house for an armed suspect.

The area of Rochester, New York, USA, where these pictures were taken is part of the so-called 'Crescent', a moon-shaped area that runs across several city neighborhoods. Crime rates here are significantly higher than the rest of Rochester. The Crescent is home to 27 percent of the city's residents and 80 percent of the city's homicides. The causes of the burst of violence include the lagging upstate economy, a steady migration of residents to the suburbs, and a growing number of abandoned houses prone to become centers of drug sales and use. Rochester also has a school system that performs poorly. People inside the Crescent experience those problems in greater concentration.

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ABOUT: 

Paolo Pellegrin was born in 1964 in Rome, Italy. He studied architecture at Sapienza Università di Roma, before moving on to photography at the Istituto Italiano di Fotografia, also in the Italian capital. Between 1991 and 2001, Pellegrin was represented by Agence VU in Paris. In 2001, he became a Magnum Photos nominee, and a full member in 2005. He is a contract photographer for Newsweek magazine in the US and Zeit magazine in Germany.

 

TECHNICAL INFORMATION

CAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark IIISHUTTER SPEED: 1/30 secISO: 6400F-STOP: 2.5FOCAL LENGTH: 50 mm 

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Scrap metal collectors | Photojournalist: Javier Manzano

Scrap metal collectors | Photojournalist: Javier Manzano | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

On the periphery of Bagram Airfield, farmers, scrap-metal collectors and sheep herders have been crippled, blinded and burned by U.S. military ammunition on an unfenced and poorly marked training ground.

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Full article : http://www.washingtonpost.com/world/asia_pacific/next-to-us-firing-range-in-afghanistan-a-village-of-victims/2012/05/26/gJQAeQEIsU_story.html

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Human condition | Documentary photographers: Colin Finlay

Human condition | Documentary photographers: Colin Finlay | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Finlay has documented the human condition with compassion, empathy, and dignity for almost twenty years. His work has taken him around the world many times. He covered conflicts in Northern Ireland, Israel, and Haiti; was in Rwanda during the time of the genocide; and photographed imprisoned child soldiers, abandoned children dying from AIDS in Romania, and child laborers in Egypt’s “City of the Dead.” He has also documented the effects of climate change on the Arctic Circle and Antarctica as well as on people in locations such as the Sudan.

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Terror Beat of Acid | Photos : Khaled Hasan

Terror Beat of Acid | Photos : Khaled Hasan | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Khaled Hasan is a Documentary Photographer. He has been awarded as 2008 All Roads Photography Program of National Geographic Society for his Documentary. Living Stone is one of his long term Project.

 

From Khaled Hasan’s work, “Terror Beat of Acid.”  In January 2010, 23-year-old Nasrina’s husband attacked her with acid. He was not satisfied with the dowry her parents paid. After two years of marriage, he wanted more. Her mother, who sells rice cakes to earn a living, refused to pay more. Her husband beat her up till she fainted, and when she was unconscious he threw acid on her face, neck and hands. Acid melts the tissues and even dissolves bones. Often eyes and ears are permanently damaged. Many victims have to undergo dozens of reconstructive surgeries to lead an independent life. No funding is available for cosmetic surgery, and most victims are from rural areas and can never afford expensive treatments. As such they are scarred for life and very few ever get married.

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Minor Miners | Photographer: Suzanne Lee

Minor Miners | Photographer: Suzanne Lee | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Minor Miners is my ongoing investigation into child labour in Indian coalmines and broader socio-economic realities that force families to use their children as full-time breadwinners doing hard labour. I explore not just the day-to-day conditions of life imposed on India's weakest and most vulnerable, but also the extensive socio-economic institutions that create these dire situations. India has the largest number of child labourers under the age of 14 in the world. With an estimated 12.6million children engaged in hazardous occupations, India's seemingly impressive economic growth of hides the crushing poverty that remain a harsh reality for millions of her children. I have been photographing the working/living conditions of child miners along India’s ‘coal-belt’ and will continue by traveling to the children’s origins, probing the core desperations they confronted, pushing them to taking these steps. Problems like displacement and loss of livelihood in their homelands can lead illiterate, unskilled communities into extreme poverty, driving them to migrate to nearby industrial towns and finally to such desperate measures as selling their children to the mining mafia.

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The Rape of a Nation | Photojournalist: Marcus Bleasdale

The Rape of a Nation | Photojournalist: Marcus Bleasdale | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is home to the deadliest war in the world today. An estimated 5.4 million people have died since 1998, the largest death toll since the Second World War, according to the International Rescue Committee (IRC).

IRC reports that as many as 45,000 people die each month in the Congo. Most deaths are due to easily preventable and curable conditions, such as malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia, malnutrition, and neonatal problems and are byproducts of a collapsed health care system and a devastated economy.

 

The people living in the mining towns of eastern Congo are among the worst off. Militia groups and government forces battle on a daily basis for control of the mineral-rich areas where they can exploit gold, coltan, cassiterite and diamonds.

 

After successive waves of fighting and ten years of war, there are no hospitals, few roads and limited NGO and UN presence because it is too dangerous to work in many of these regions. The West’s desire for minerals and gems has contributed to a fundamental breakdown in the social structure.

Photo report's insight:

Marcus Bleasdale was born in the UK to an Irish family, in 1968.  He grew up in the north of England and initially studied economics and started work as an investment banker. Although he was a director in a large international bank he resigned in the mid 1990s and began to travel through the Balkans with his camera.

 

He returned to study photojournalism at the prestigious London School, during which time he won the Ian Parry, Young photographer Award for his work on the conflict in Sierra Leone. He has established himself as one of the worlds leading documentary photographers concentrating on Conflict and Human Rights.

 

He has been awarded many of the worlds highest honors for his work and continues to highlight the effects of conflict on society. He is a member of the photo agency VII. He lives with his wife Karin Beate in Oslo, Norway.

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Shadows In Greece | Photojournalist: ENRI CANAJ

Shadows In Greece | Photojournalist: ENRI CANAJ | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The centre of Athens, as I first remember it, was full of life. During the period before the Olympic Games, there was great development. New hotels appeared in order to host the visitors, shops, restaurants and cafes kept sprouting out, it was full of people everywhere. All this happened within a few years. It was as if the city put on new clothes. During the days of the Olympics, the city was clean and well-guarded. You would not see street-merchants, drug-addicts or immigrants, just tourists and people who came in order to have a good time. In my eyes, it looked like another place. As time passed, the city started deteriorating and gradually recovered its previous character. Time passes fast.

 

The city is now fading. Some people abandon it due to the crisis. Many shops and hotels have shut down,  the centre is now almost deserted. People fear they will get ripped-off, they hear that this happens all the time.They even fear seeing all the poverty and destitution, they drug-users who will rip you off for their shot, the women prostituting themselves. But for me, those people were always there. I found them all there when I first arrived as a 9-year old child. They were always there when I was growing up. They are somehow trapped in their lives.  The immigrants live in small rooms that they rent, many of them together, without much hope.

 

The women prostitute themselves even in the streets for 5€. Yet, hanging around with them has been my daily routine. This way, it was easier to approach them. They are sensitive people with a lot of problems, with ruined families behind them. Sometimes they give the impression that no one has cared for them. As if they want someone to talk to, as if they want to get out of the misery they are in. For some of them I had the sense that they were almost looking for someone to open up to and take it all out. Like confessing. What made an impression on me was that they often opened up and talked as if they knew me. I would only shoot when I sensed that they were more comfortable, after some time had passed. The images I have selected are stronger for me, because I know the story behind them. - 

ENRI CANAJ

Photo report's insight:

Photographer Enri Canaj documents the heart-wrenching decline of a once-prosperous city in his series 'Shadows of Greece.' Plagued by poverty, crime, sex trafficking and the political protests of fascist and anti-fascist groups, Athens no longer offers its citizens a safe environment. Canaj, who migrated to Athens at age 11, takes a special interest in the city's immigrant populace and the agonizing conditions and treatment they are subject to.

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Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"The Narmada River project created by the Indian Government involves the construction of 30 large, 135 medium and 3000 small dams to harness the waters of the Narmada river and its tributaries. The proponents of the dam claim that this plan would provide large amounts of water and electricity which are required for development purposes. Opponent of the dam question the basic assumptions of the Narmada Valley Development Plan and believe that its plan is unjust and inequitable…" - Samuel Aranda

Photo report's insight:

Aranda began to work as a photographer for newspapers El País and El Periódico de Catalunya at the age of 19. Two years later he traveled to the Middle East, where he covered the Israeli–Palestinian conflict for the Spanish news agency EFE.

In 2004 Aranda begun working for AFP, covering stories in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The photojournalist association ANIGP-TV awarded Arandas feature documentary about African immigrants trying to reach Europe with the Spanish National Award of Photography. Since 2006 he is working as a freelance photojournalist.

In 2011 Aranda covered the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen. In February 2012 he was awarded the World Press Photo of the Year 2011. The winning picture shows an a woman embracing her son, wounded during clashes against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen, part of the Arab Spring.

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Sicarios | Photojournalist: Javier Arcenillas

Sicarios | Photojournalist: Javier Arcenillas | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

“One of the most popular and respected professions in Latin America is that of the sicarios.  Although revenues are variable (for killing someone), a hit can charge from 15 € up to tens of thousands), killing in Guatemala, Salvador, Honduras and Mexico is recruiting many young people, including minors, who are seduced  by the ease of earning money that gives them respect and fear.  In the process of training young killers from the poorest strata of society consumed they begin killing dogs and pets to loose all your nerves.”  - Javier Arcenilla

Photo report's insight:

Javier Arcenilla is described as a Humanist, Freelance photographer and member of Gea Photowords. He develops humanitarian essays where the main characters are integrated in societies that borders and sets upon any reason or (human) right in a world that becomes increasingly more and more indifferent.

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Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala

Congo | Photojournalist: Álvaro Ybarra Zavala | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Democratic Republic of Congo has the dubious honour of holding two records. The first, paradoxically, comes from a natural blessing: it is the country on the African continent with the largest mineral wealth. But the gold, diamonds and Coltan (colombo-tantalite ore) have been and are an active part of the civil conflict in which Congo is submerged. The second is that it is the country with the largest number of victims from armed conflict since the Second World War. An estimated 4-5 million human beings have died because of the civil war since 1996.

 

The Rwanda genocide in 1994–which killed close to one million people, mostly Tutsis and moderate Hutus–created ideal conditions in the eastern Congo for horror, death and destruction. Since the end of the genocide, the Rwandan Tutsi troops have maintained an active role in the region: they organize and arm local pro-Tutsi guerrillas like the CNDP (French: Congrès National pour la Défense du Peuple) under the justification that Hutu militias...- Álvaro Ybarra Zavala 

 

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The July War | Photojournalist: Timothy Fadek

The July War | Photojournalist: Timothy Fadek | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

With the firestorm coming from the Rathergate crowd, and doubts now spreading from the left wingabout images from Lebanon, it can start to feel like all reason is being subsumed by political hysteria.  At the same time, war photojournalism seems at risk of being tarred with one brush.

I spent about a half-hour on the phone this evening with photojournalist and contributer Tim Fadek, who has been in Lebanon for about three weeks covering the war.

 

Having been present following the Qana air strike, Tim emphasized that there was no parading or manipulation of bodies, and that the scene was not staged in any way.  That said, Tim took pains to explain how this kind of situation carries with it certain cultural practices and emotional responses that don’t transfer well to the West.  This seems especially true right now, in the super-heated and intensely polarized political environment in the U.S.

"When there is senseless death in this part of the world," Tim explains, "it is completely normal to display the bodies.  Whether in plastic or on blankets, it’s done whether there are photographers there or not.  The idea is to ready the public for what has happened, and also say, look what our enemies have done to us."

 

Regarding the images cited as evidence of manipulation, Fadek said: "a finer distinction is being lost in the West.  In Qana, rescue workers did not hold up a baby to set up a shot.  They were not displaying them to the media, per se.  Yes, it was not lost on these men that the cameras presented a window to the world.  But these people were doing wrenching rescue work and they are human beings.  These instances [of holding up babies] were mostly spontaneous and momentary expressions of anger."

Tim also explained the circumstances surrounding his own images.  Although he felt the photo above was more powerful shown this way, he explained that a rescue worker did set down the body, briefly uncovering it for photographers to document.

For those inclined to consider the depictions as manipulated, Fadek also offers the following image, along with the circumstances involved.


Once removed from the collapsed building, these bodies were set on the ground to be taken down a hill.   From this spot to the waiting ambulances was at least a four minute walk.  In this case, the two children were placed on this blanket where photographers had 1 1/2 to to 2 seconds to document them.  Given the distance and the available manpower, the two bodies were placed on the same blanket to save effort.

In each case, Tim’s understanding was that the rescuers were acting in a manner reflecting a normal attitude toward the dead.  "It’s not a manipulation, it’s a cultural distinction," said Fadek.  "It’s the same as at a martyrs funeral, where faces are exposed, and the bodies marched through the streets.  It’s been done for years, media or otherwise."

Photo report's insight:

The July War : Timothy Fadek is an american photographer whose assignment work has been published in Time, Newsweek, The New York Times Magazine, Stern, Le Monde, National Geographic and scores of other publications.

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PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto

PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Article 18 of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Cambodia: “the state will protect the rights of children, particularly the right to life, education, and protection during times of war, in addition to protection against economic and sexual exploitation”.

At present Cambodia has around 14 million inhabitants, a number which has increased favourably in recent years due to the period of relative peace the country has experienced since 1993.  Depending on the time of year, the capital, Phnom Penh, has between two and three million inhabitants.

In a country where 81% of the population gain their livelihood from agriculture, the climate determines everything.  However, the extreme poverty in rural areas, the non-existence of technological farming, climatic instability, etc., are all factors which force the population to emigrate to the city in hope of finding a better life.  Unfortunately, what usually happens in these cases is that life does not become better, but the complete opposite.  Due to the parents’ inability to look after all the family members, Cambodian boys and girls have the tendency to start fending for themselves from a very early age.

 

 In the capital, approximately half the children and teenagers who look after themselves have arrived alone from surrounding provinces, with only a few coins in their pockets.  Some of the children will return to their villages after a few days, weeks, or even months.  Others will spend so long on the street that it becomes impossible to return, simply because they forget who they are and where they come from.  At their roots there is always a completely unstructured family unit, in most cases because of extreme poverty, AIDS, or alcoholism which almost always transforms into domestic violence.

Organised into small groups, the bonds that the children build amongst themselves are strong, deep and sincere; as primitive as the survival instinct itself.  Malnutrition, illness, drug abuse, sexual harassment from tourists, traffic…these are all daily threats that the children face.  Perhaps, above all of those, the lack of affection from society, the feeling of abandonment and the shortage of self-confidence could be seen as the strongest and most pressing threat of all.  Forgotten by their politicians who are immersed in dismantling their country in the shortest possible time, at the moment the only valid option the children have to leave the street is to go through an NGO.  This, however, will never be the solution to the problem.

 

Photo report's insight:

Another link of photo documentary: http://www.fotovisura.com/user/MikeA/view/rue-24-phnom-penh-kampuchea

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LIFE IN WAR | Photojopurnalist: Majid Saeedi

LIFE IN WAR | Photojopurnalist: Majid Saeedi | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Herat, Afghanistan

Zahra, 20, burned herself four years ago. Women are in a subordinate position in Afghan society, where conservative Islamic laws and tribal traditions dictate what they are allowed to do. Forced marriages, domestic violence, poverty, and lack of access to education are said to be some of the main reasons for self-immolation.

Afghanistan has dealt with decades of war - sometimes under attack from other countries and at other times with civil wars. As a result, Afghans suffer from serious traumas and hurt as survivors of war, whether children who have lost parents or single mothers managing for their families after their husbands have been killed. Despite poverty, drug addiction, and lack of education, life goes on in Afghanistan as people continue to try to heal and live with hope.

Photo report's insight:

Majid Saeedi is an award-winning, internationally recognized Iranian photographer. He has photographed throughout the Middle East for the past two decades, focusing on humanitarian issues, with a special interest in telling previously untold stories of social injustice. He also especially enjoys doing street photography – portraying citizens and ordinary life. TECHNICAL INFORMATIONCAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II

SHUTTER SPEED: 1/100 sec
ISO: 640
F-STOP: 4
FOCAL LENGTH: 105 mm  

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SCHOOL FOR LESS FORTUNATE | Photographer: ALTAF QADRI

SCHOOL FOR LESS FORTUNATE | Photographer: ALTAF QADRI | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

07 November 2012

New Delhi, India

Every morning, children from nearby slums arrive in small groups, barefoot and carrying mats and brooms and start cleaning a portion of a land under a metro rail bridge, which will be their school for the rest of the morning. Rajesh Kumar Sharma, along with his friend, founded the free school for underprivileged children under a metro bridge a year ago. He teaches at least 45 children every day. Sharma, a 40-year-old father of three from Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous state, was forced to drop out of college in his third year due to financial difficulties. He didn't want other children to face the same difficulties, so he decided to start the free school.

 

He persuaded local laborers and farmers to allow their children to attend his school instead of working to add to the family income. He prepares these children for admission to government schools and hopes to equip them with the tools necessary to overcome their poverty. Millions of dollars are given to fund the education of poor children in India, however it often doesn't reach them because of corruption and arduous administrative procedures.

Photo report's insight:

TECHNICAL INFORMATIONSHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 100F-STOP: 1.4FOCAL LENGTH: 50CAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II

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Mughli – The Lonely Mother | Altaf Qadri

Mughli – The Lonely Mother | Altaf Qadri | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"All the stories I have worked on, have their own importance in my life and all of them are memorable in one-way or the other. But the story, which still haunts me, is about Mughli-The Lonely Mother. I have seen how that old woman struggled each passing day. I have seen her visit police stations pleading with officers to get a clue of her missing son, who was born after she was divorced. I have seen her crying in the solitude of her home, with the result she could barely see. I have seen her at Sufi shrines praying for the return of her only son.


She lived 19 years in solitude and pain. However she was always hopeful to see her missing son once again which she never did. I feel extremely sorry that Mughli died without a closure. I got a feeling that she liked it when I used to visit her, maybe she was trying to see her son in me and I also liked to give her as much as company I could. It seems that our relation had moved beyond from being a subject and a photographer. During our last meeting in summer of 2009, I had promised her to meet again once I’ll be back from my assignment in Afghanistan but unfortunately I could never see her again."- Altaf Qadri

Photo report's insight:

Altaf Qadri is an award winning photographer who works for the The Associated Press. His photographs and stories from events in Kashmir have appeared all around the globe including Time, The Guardian, New York Times, International Herald Tribune, Washington Post, and The Times among others. His work has been exhibited in many places including Los Angeles, New York, Paris, Cambodia, New Delhi, Beijing and Mumbai.

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Sunil Janah dies

Sunil Janah dies | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
NEW YORK — Sunil Janah, an Indian photographer who achieved international fame with his pictures of the famine that devastated Bengal in 1943 and 1944, died June 21 at his home in Berkeley, Calif. He was 94.
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