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Wonderful black and white photography
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Children’s dreams | Photographer: Arthur Tress

Children’s dreams | Photographer: Arthur Tress | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

For his 1960s project on children’s dreams, legendary photographer Arthur Tress visualizes the subconscious fears of the innocent mind. While working with educator Richard Lewis of The Touchstone Center, he observed an exercise in which young people were asked to construct poems and paintings of their dreams; inspired, he began collaborating with children to create haunting silver gelatin photographs.

Influenced in part by the concept of Jungian archetypes, the images represent both the anxieties of the individual and the collective dread of the transformative decade. Here, domestic life and its mundane chores cease to provide comfort, and the home—and by extension, the mother figure herself— becomes irreversibly corrupted and decayed. Uprooted literally and figuratively from the safe space of wakefulness, the children must navigate a landscape riddled with a perversion that they do not yet comprehend.

As the virtues of childhood fade the reveal the sins of a hopelessly adult world, the threat of punishment and humiliation is ever-present, in the form of a dunce cap or in a vengeful flood brought by some unknowable deity. Ultimately, the impulse to grow and mature with the times is met with the irresistible urge to retreat, to pinch oneself and to awake from a nightmare that seems inescapable.

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Ten Thousand Scrolls | Photographer: Kirk Crippens

Ten Thousand Scrolls | Photographer: Kirk Crippens | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
“Traveling ten thousand miles is better than reading ten thousand scrolls” is a Chinese proverb that speaks to the heart of Kirk Crippens’ recent portrait project. He was hungry for knowledge of China that he couldn’t get just by reading, so he traveled from his home in the East Bay area to the small city Chinese city of Lishui. With just two words of Mandarin (Ni hao, which means “hello”), he managed to meet hundreds of people who allowed him to photograph them and who took him into their homes and into their confidence. Crippens is one of three photographers (along with Maggie Preston and David Wolf) participating in the 2012 RayKo artists-in-residence program. A joint exhibition is currently on view at the RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco through December 14th, 2012.
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Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra

Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I first came to Kashmir in the early spring of 2007 at the end of a motorcycle trip across India and I fell in love with the people, the light, and the atmosphere of this remote place. But as much as I love it, the political situation of the valley continues to bring disorder and conflict. 

Currently there are two conflicts in Kashmir, and each is tightly woven into the other: The more known conflict is the international, atomically loaded border dispute between India and its archenemy, Pakistan, regarding the affiliation of Kashmir between the two states. The other, less known one, is the inner-Kashmiri conflict on the Indian side of the border (which is two- thirds of the complete territory), where the people struggle for independence from India.  I have spent the last two years documenting this conflict, most recently in the summer of 2009 when I spent two months on the Indian side.

I attended meetings of parents who have had children disappear without leaving a note or ever coming back. I was invited into homes where family members mourned the rape and murder of two young girls by paramilitary forces.  I photographed a family whose sons were shot during one of the countless demonstrations.  These experiences didn‘t differ from my last two trips to Kashmir - the political and social climate remained the same as it was when I left the region half a year prior. The slogans were also the same during the countless demonstrations against the Indian army, the symbol of the occupation of what the Kashmiris call their soil: “Ham ka chate? Azadi!"- "What do we want? Freedom!" 

Looking over the sixty-year history of this conflict, it seems highly unlikely that the people of Kashmir will gain independence in the foreseeable future and that the world will see an independent Kashmir again. This strategic region is too important for either nation to ever let it go.- Andy Spyra

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Kham Territory | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi

Kham Territory | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Kham is the name of the plateau located on the eastern third of Tibet. It is divided between the Chinese provinces of Yunnan, Sichuan and Qinghai (only the first two are represented in these photographs).  In spite of being historically and culturally united to Tibet’s central territory, Kham has various special characteristics such as the fighting spirit of its inhabitants.  The proportion of Tibetans varies in the region. There are fewer the more east you go towards China.  The majority are farmers and cattle breeders who leave trade and business in the hands of the Chinese.  Living together is not always easy between the two communities.- Mikel Aristregi

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Seas Without A Shore | Photographer: Chris Anthony

Seas Without A Shore | Photographer: Chris Anthony | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Los Angeles-based photographer Chris Anthony has been working on this series, Seas Without A Shore, for the past 18 months. Working with wet plate collodion and tintype processes, Anthony photographs objects that mean a lot to him. Mysterious still life, portraits and magical creatures of the sea represent ongoing themes throughout the series: solitude, hope and survival.

Anthony is currently raising money through Kickstarter to fund the publication of Seas Without A Shore which will include over 90 photographs.

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Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold

Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The sacred tattoos in Thailand are much more than just an art form, and with a culture deeply rooted in superstition and spirituality, such tattoos are believed to have magical and healing powers. Thai men and also women have their sacred tattoos done at Buddhist temples, for protection against evil spirits, and as good luck charms.

Cedric Arnold's website tells that these sacred tattoos can be scripts based on ancient Khmer, and the original Buddhist Pali, along with figures and mythical creatures. Using large-format and Polaroid cameras, formal black-and-white portraits were made of boxers, monks, construction workers, policemen, soldiers, taxi drivers, shipyards workers, a shaman, and tattoo masters.

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Black and white | Fine art photographer: Wei Chuan Liu

Black and white | Fine art photographer: Wei Chuan Liu | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Weichuan Liu is a Chinese photographer whose photos are absolutely gorgeous. He perfectly captures with his camera Panasonic DMC-LX3 the atmosphere of the environments around him. His portraits have a real charm too. Most of his photos are in black and white, so our selection focus on these.

 

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Target Unknown | Photographer: Stacy Kranitz

Target Unknown | Photographer: Stacy Kranitz | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Once a year in Pennsylvania, 500 people come together to reenact the Battle of the Bulge. During the reenactment, I portray Leni Riefenstahl and behave with soldiers, as she would have. Rather than seek out a simple role model who fit a classic heroine profile, I became intrigued by the complex story of a woman I could both love and hate. In Riefenstahl, I found a multidimensional character with a focused vision and a murky set of morals. These grey areas spoke to my desire to understand people beyond the constraints of good versus evil. This experience allows me to reflect upon atrocity, delve into my own relationship with my Jewish heritage, and contemplate the camera's ability to re-imagine history. "

 

"I have inserted myself into the Nazi reenactor photographs in an effort to subvert the viewer’s instinct to dismiss these people as different from themselves. I believe that the grey areas between ethical imperatives may offer new potential to understand and relate to a subject.
Much of our conception of history is based on images. The reenactors base the authenticity of their looks on images and, in particular, on Riefenstahl’s film Triumph of the Will. Historical images have been filtered through media and propaganda. These images become history as generations pass, memories fade. Photographs and film become the dominant forces that shape the public imagination. My newly created images of the reenactment are part of the deconstruction process by which images first represent and then replace history."

(Stacy Kranitz : http://stacykranitzprojects.com/targetunknown)

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Body building | Photographer: Bess Adler

Body building | Photographer: Bess Adler | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"In this series, I document a community whose members devote massive energy to strengthening and displaying their bodies. Rigorous and exciting competitions determine who has the most perfect physique. Line up, walk, display, flex, and judge. These men and women march across a well-lit stage, stop midway and expose sculpted bodies, the product of perseverance and hard labor.

 

Bodybuilders use weightlifting, diet, tanning, and oils to pursue highly specific results. Their appearance might seem exaggerated or strange to people from the outside world, but within the bodybuilding community, inflated biceps and over-sized chests represent beauty. However, with this allure comes a demand for lifestyle sacrifices and arduous workouts.

 

Training for competitions is a year-long process and almost a full-time job. Bodybuilders work out six or seven days of the week for three to four hours a day. Contestants follow extreme and highly-regimented diets prior and subsequent to the competitions. Cooking and grocery shopping are often time-consuming, as some routines call for eight meals a day. Bodybuilders struggle to balance their life, which includes training, jobs, families, and sleep. Regardless, many participants relish the experience of being onstage and setting new goals for themselves at every competition. They describe competitions as euphoric. Even though performing and having one’s body scrutinized can be nerve-wracking, the attention bodybuilders receive is highly gratifying, especially for the winner.

 

As a photographer, I am interested in capturing the tradition of bodybuilding, and the competitive, robust nature of the shows. My series aims to bring viewers closer to this insular and ritualistic community. In the process, I hope to raise questions about the sacrifices we all make in pursuing our ideals." (Bess Adler, photographer)

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Sunil Janah dies

Sunil Janah dies | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
NEW YORK — Sunil Janah, an Indian photographer who achieved international fame with his pictures of the famine that devastated Bengal in 1943 and 1944, died June 21 at his home in Berkeley, Calif. He was 94.
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Sexe, Love... | Photographer: Eric Bouvet

Sexe, Love... | Photographer: Eric Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Three-year work. A documentary about the world of sex.

People who find it funny, others who work, or who have made choices. Remember the white background with the work of Richard Avedon in the American West and a standing position... The models themselves appear unadorned exterior and manners as neutral as possible.

 

Eric Bouvet, 1961, France, started his career in 1981 after studying Art and Graphic Industries in Paris. During the 80's he worked as a staff photographer at Gamma agency. In 1990 he launched his freelance career and has since been an independant photojournalist. He has traveled extensively to many conflict zones as Iraq, Iran, Sudan, Somalia, former Yugoslavia and very recently Libya. He has covered the gruesome war in Chechnya for a long period and has visited Afghanistan a dozen of times since 1986, witnissing the various wars the country has suffered. His images have an intimate and up-close character. His work has been published in numerous magazines as Time, Life, Newsweek, Stern and the New York Times magazine. He has worked with a variety of NGO's and charities as Medecins Sans Frontieres and the International Red Cross. His work has received several awards amongst which are five World Press Awards. The following images come from the series The Beginning (Libya), Uzbin Valley (Afghanistan) and Russian Commandos - Chechnya.

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Chineses | Photos Liu Zheng 刘铮

Chineses | Photos Liu Zheng 刘铮 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Liu Zheng est un photographe chinois né en 1969 dans le comté de Wuqiang, province de Hebei. Il passa son enfance dans la ville minière de Datong (province de Shanxi), avant de vivre et de travailler à Beijing.

En 1994, Liu Zheng commença de photographier des moments de vie dans lesquels des personnages chinois typiques ont été rencontrés dans des situations extrêmes et souvent inattendues. La série The Chinese tire le portrait d'une société en butte aux contradictions entre la culture traditionnelle et la modernisation. Elle présente un large échantillonnage de la société et montre les riches, les pauvres, les transsexuels, les mineurs, les acteurs d'opéra, aussi bien que les figures de cire des musées historiques.

De 1991 à 1997, Zheng a travaillé comme reporter pour le Workers’ Daily, un des journeaux chinois les plus lus, dans l'optique de montrer les liens historiques entre la propagande politique et l'idéologie communiste, plutôt que de viser les rapports de la photographie avec la vérité. Il commença de travailler sur le thème des Chinois à un moment de changements explosifs et de développement de l'art contemporain, catalysé par les réformes en cours. Dans ce contexte, Zheng utilise la photographie pour construire une fausse réalité. Les éclairages et les poses de ses photographies au format carré semblent un peu naïfs mais en réalité la mise en scène coexiste avec les éléments spontanés dans toute cette série.

Influencée à la fois par les œuvres de Diane Arbus et d'August Sander, la série The Chinese montre au spectateur une étude personnalisée de la culture chinoise, concentrée sur les aspects psychologiques les plus sombres. Un mélange de dure réalité et de romantisme, d'engagement et de détachement, tente de reconstituer l’histoire des Chinois par ce processus.

 

Publications The Chinese .- Göttingen, Allemagne, Steidl et New-York, International Center of Photography, 2004. (ISBN 3-86521-037-6)

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Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ

Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Albania is a small country in the heart of the Balkans. Despite its rich culture, people outside do generally not know much about it. It is also my homeland, the place of my early childhood. I grew up seperated from it, and returned later to pick up the threads that were left behind. 

What I found was modernity and tradition living together. I traveled a lot and started to know my birthplace, the people, their mentality, and their traditions. I felt very welcome, and was fascinated by all the people I met. They were kind, friendly and curious about my work.

 

I made this journey together with my wife. When people realized we were a couple, they were very open, they welcomed us inside their homes and extended wishes, blessings and congratulations. Marriage is very important in Albania. Everyone has to get married, it is considered to make men stronger and more respected in society.

 

In this photographic project I would like to show the everyday lives of Albanian people – the big picture, as well as the small, seemingly insignificant moments. What impressed me most was the strong family union, the connection among people. I found it everywhere – in married young couples and their babies, at a funeral ceremony where relatives shared their pain, at a wedding party, or when a son accompanied his father at work. I didn’t see any lonely people. - 

ENRI CANAJ
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Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres

Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Fernando Moleres was born in Bilbao, Spain in 1963. He began work as a nurse in his home village, traveling in 1987 to pursue that calling in Nicaragua, during the Sandinista period. It was there that Moleres began to appreciate the value of photography and to teach himself how to do it. During the early 1990s, he combined nursing work with long periods traveling and doing photo projects, such as Children at Work, which lasted several years and took him to many countries. His photos have appeared in a number of international publications, such as Stern, Le Figaro Magazine, Le Monde 2, La Republica, Io Donna, The Independent and The Sunday Times Magazine. Moleres has published two books and has had more than 20 solo exhibitions worldwide. His honors include a Picture of the Year 2011, two previous World Press Photo prizes (in 2008 and 1998), a W. Eugene Smith Grant, a Erna and Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant, and a Lucia Award 2012 Deeper Perspectives Award, among others. Moleres is now based in Barcelona.

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Maiko & Geiko | Photographer: Arif Iqball

Maiko & Geiko | Photographer: Arif Iqball | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Outside Japan there is often a misunderstanding about the role of the Geisha and that misunderstanding comes from different literary and movie interpretations/fictionalization by non-Japanese at different points in history. The difficulty also comes from the inability to recognize/accept that female entertainers can exist in cultures without engaging in any form of sexual entertainment.

 

The historical city of Kyoto, Japan is the true center of this floating world and home to five Kagai (literally flower towns, but specifically, performance districts) where you can see Geishas today. The oldest Kagai dates back to the fifteenth century and the tradition of the Geisha continues in Kyoto in the true manner and spirit as it has historically, where the women take pride in being “women of the mind” versus “women of the body”. By all local/Japanese definitions, these women are living art as well as the pinnacle of Japanese eloquence, good manners, style and elegance and are highly respected in Japanese society as artists. Some of their teachers have been labeled as “Living National Treasures” by the Japanese Government. The “Gei” of the Geisha itself means Art and “sha” means a person. Historically both men and women have been labeled Geisha although that word is seldom used and Geiko and Maiko (Apprentice Geiko) are the more appropriate forms of address.

 

There has been very little work done to photograph the artistic side of the Geiko and Maiko and my work is an effort to see them as living art and to be able to portray them in both formal and informal settings. Behind the painted face is really a teenager/young woman working very hard through song, dance, music, and witty conversation to make the customers of the tea houses escape from their world of stress to a world of art/humour/relaxation and laughter.

Most of this work was done in Medium Format to enable the viewer to eventually see and feel the larger photograph itself as art and I hope that this broader work can shed a new light to the understanding of the Maiko and Geiko and bring respect to them as artists from the non-Japanese viewer.

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Yoga performers | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty

Yoga performers | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

There are many interpretations of yoga, both in India and in the western world. In the Vedic religious tradition, yoga is seen as a pathway to achieving spiritual enlightenment through physical training and as a way of living in harmony with your body and nature. It is also an accepted form of gymnastics and is often used as therapy. Yoga, with its Indian roots stretching back 2000 years, is not typically associated with sport since it does not involve any competition. However, every three years, pilgrims, spiritual masters, and yogis travel to India for the Kumbh Mela Hindu feast. Different schools and sects meet to display their achievements in the practice of yoga and pranayama (control over the breath).


It’s the biggest gathering of people in the world. One of Shiva’s manifestations, the god Nataraja, is the patron saint of the event. Over time, the rules of competition were formally organized and most recently, yoga asana has been included in modern sport yoga. Yogis who participate in the contest are separated into age groups and perform in singles, pairs, or groups. But even with all these formal rules and regulations, the technical aspect does not eclipse the spiritual. The official rules of the Yoga Federation of India state that “while performing yoga positions the contestant should show his/her happiness and spirituality.” This helps keep contestants in touch with teachings of the ancient Hindu masters, who regarded happiness as a task well within the reach of all humans.

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A casual lunchtime snap, or the world's most iconic publicity stunt?

A casual lunchtime snap, or the world's most iconic publicity stunt? | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
This photograph of construction workers casually eating their lunch on a skyscraper beam suspended high about Manhattan can lay claim to being one of the 20th century's most recognisable images.

 

Yet, in the run up to its 80th anniversary today it has emerged that, far from catching the subjects unaware, the image was set up as a publicity shot for the Rockefeller Center.

The identity of the photographer of Lunch Atop a Skyscraper is unknown. He or she was among a pack of snappers sent by news agencies to cover the event at the RCA Building. Another, less celebrated, image shows the workers pretending to be asleep on the beam.

Ken Johnston, chief historian and archivist for Corbis Images, which owns the rights to the photo, said: "The image was a publicity effort by the Rockefeller Center.It seems pretty clear they were real workers, but the event was organised with a number of photographers."

The photograph was taken on 20 September 1932, during the construction of the RCA site – later renamed the GE Building – which forms part of the Rockefeller Center.

The original caption on the photo marked that it would be the largest office building in New York City, the archivist said.

 

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The Masai Typology | Travel photographer: Nicolas Lotsos

The Masai Typology | Travel photographer: Nicolas Lotsos | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
The Masai Typology is one of the many gorgeous photo galleries of Africa by photographer Nicolas Lotsos. I'm not much of an African wildlife aficionado, but his fine art galleries of photographs of the handsome Masai, of Zanzibar, or of the African slums and townships are lovely exemplars of monochromatic imagery. Nicolas Lotsos is  a fine art photographer (and in my view, a travel photographer as well) and a basketball agent. He co-runs a sports agency representing some of the top sports figures in Europe. He has been a photographer since he was 16 years old, and specializes in photographs of wild life and nature.

 

He also won an impressive number of awards, to include Gold Winner at the 2012 Grand Prix de la Photographie, Outstanding Achievement at the Spider Award 2012, the 2012 Veolia Wildlife Photographer Award, including two awards by the Travel Photographer Of The Year (TPOTY), amongst others.

A Nilotic group in East Africa, next to the Indian Ocean, the Masai society is patriarchal, and elder men decide most major matters for each group. A full body of oral law covers many aspects of behaviour. The Masai are monotheistic, worshipping a single deity.

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Portraits of Patagonian Cowboys | Photographer: Mustafah Abdulaziz for National Geographic

Portraits of Patagonian Cowboys | Photographer: Mustafah Abdulaziz for National Geographic | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Mustafah Abdulaziz is a documentary photographer based in Berlin, Germany. He has been a member of the international photography collective MJR since 2008. This work is from his series, Patagonian Cowboys.

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Artist Talk with Lauren E. Simonutti (2010)

In an attempt to understand why artists create the work they make, we decided to launch Artist Talk in September of 2008, a video series which allows the viewer to hear, from the artist, the reasons behind making each piece on exhibit.

 

In an attempt to understand why artists create the work they make, we decided to launch Artist Talk in September of 2008, a video series which allows the viewer to hear, from the artist, the reasons behind making each piece on exhibit.

This video was filmed during Lauren E. Simonutti's 2010 exhibition "8 Rooms, 7 Mirrors, 6 Clocks, 2 Minds & 199 Panes of Glass". The show page can be found here bit.ly/8UA3Bz

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Changsha | Photographer: Rian Dundon

Changsha | Photographer: Rian Dundon | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

“I said I was going to do the first book of China without a picture of Mao in there, but he slipped in in the background,” Mr. Dundon said. “I’ll leave that up to the reader to find.”

Mr. Dundon writes in his introduction to the project on Emphas.is (http://www.emphas.is/web/guest/discoverprojects?projectID=616) about how he sought to make pictures “that didn’t necessarily read as China.” Instead, he presents a personal narrative, an exploration of a city and the region around it.

“There’s a very prescribed version of China that I think Western photographers, or visual people, kind of adhere to,” he said over the phone from Sacramento, where he lives. He wanted to avoid the photographic clichés that often come out of China — masses of people, skyscrapers, the color red, Tiananmen Square, poverty juxtaposed with sleek modernity. It was the only way he felt he could create something honest, “and not this kind of post-colonial, white guy goes to China” project.

He wanted to know people, and to explore those relationships with his photography — as he’d always done in his work.

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Detroit | Photographer: Ian Willms

Detroit | Photographer: Ian Willms | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Detroit" is an exploration of blue collar America in the wake of globalization. The economic prosperity that came with domestic automotive manufacturing drew many hard-working Americans to Detroit and other industrial cities over the last century. As free trade facilitated the mass-outsourcing of labour, many of America's domestic manufacturing jobs evaporated. The impact this had upon working-class Americans was and continues to be devastating. 

My work in Detroit is a document of the industrial American culture that is quickly beginning to vanish. As old factories lay empty and silent, awaiting their inevitable demolition, fewer and fewer goods are manufactured locally. Free trade has not only taken jobs from the community, but it has also taken the pride away from the workers who remain. From the cars on the street to the clothes on a person's back, goods are now made elsewhere by people that we have never met. America no longer has a use for places like the Detroit, and like so many surplus labourers, the city itself has been abandoned like a broken down, old car. 

For most people, the story ends there. We take our pink slip and swallow that lump in our throat as we pack up and move away. Fortunately, the decades of back-breaking labour that built America made Detroiters into a tough breed. Those who remain in the Motor City display a remarkable level of creativity, resourcefulness and resiliency.

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Thailand: Tattoo Festival II | Travel Photographer: Gavin Gough

Thailand: Tattoo Festival II | Travel Photographer: Gavin Gough | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

One of the most colourful and bizarre festivals in the world takes place outside Bangkok this Saturday. Gavin Gough joins the devotees for black and white documentary.

 

Gavin Gough produces stock photographs for Getty and Lonely Planet images. His vibrant stock collection includes images from more than forty countries which have been reproduced in hundreds of newspapers, magazines and books and are regularly featured in publications such as National Geographic, Geo, Vogue, The New York Times, The Guardian, and many more. His stock images have appeared on everything from postage stamps to magazine covers and billboards.

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Street photography | Photographer: Matt Stuart

Street photography | Photographer: Matt Stuart | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
I am not sure which came first, my being nosey or an interest in 'street photography', but a fascination with people and the way they live their lives is why I enjoy the business so much.

 

There is something special and unique about photographer Matt Stuart's 'Street Photography', these photographs are honest pictures that display beauty and significance of the everyday life which otherwise would have gone unnoticed by the rest of us. And what makes them more interesting is the fact that these are entirely spontaneous. And this makes it necessary for Stuart to be in the right place at the right time. He is always ready with his small Leica camera, lots of optimism and patience to make an image and move on.

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