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L'intuition dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet

L'intuition dans la photographie | Conseil photo: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"J’ai encore présent à l’esprit de nombreuses gravures illustrées de John Tenniel, de Cornelis Visscher, d’Émile Bayard, de Léon Benett, de Gustave Doré ou de Thomas Johnson. Je dois beaucoup à ces illustrateurs qui m’ont rendu avide des écrits de Jules Vernes, de Jean de La Fontaine ou de Miguel De Cervantès. Par ailleurs, il m’ont donné le goût des récits d’aventures, d’histoire et de documentaires anciens comme le Petit Journal par exemple.

Les illustrations ont fait entrer dans ma caboche des dizaines de récits visuels sans trop d’effort. C’est la force des images, n’est-ce pas ? Les images font entrer les idées essentielles dans l’esprit avec une grande aisance. Pour l’enfant que j’étais, ce moyen pour retenir certaines choses me convenaient parfaitement. Une cascade de mots ou de chiffres, c’est parfois trop abstrait pour l’imagination. L’image s’efface difficilement de la mémoire." - Serge Bouvet

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Taso's curator insight, November 17, 2014 3:37 PM

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I Am Georgia | Photographer: Dina Oganova

I Am Georgia |  Photographer: Dina Oganova | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

For photographer Dina Oganova, each and every aspect of her country is precious and unique. In her series I Am Georgia, Oganova chronicles the daily facets of the homeland she has always treasured. Here we see children at play, the elderly at prayer, and everyday familial celebrations.


Made up of only four million residents, Georgia has existed as a sovereign state for a little over a decade. Bordered by Russia, Turkey and the Black Sea, the country faced civil war the same year it declared independence from the Soviet Union.


A land of refugees and with a history of conflict, Georgia’s people attempt to hold on to traditions while plunging into the future. In this relatively new and foreign landscape, I Am Georgia is a personal and spirited testament to who the country is and to who it is becoming.

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Lu Nan’s Trilogy of Men | Photographer: Lu Nan 呂楠

Lu Nan’s Trilogy of Men | Photographer:  Lu Nan 呂楠 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Lu Nan’s Trilogy of Men: China’s Catholicism & Forgotten People, and 4 Seasons in Tibet

 

Influential Chinese Photographer Lu Nan 呂楠 is a man of mystery, shying away from cameras, the public and publicity. Lu has also been known to hide his name and movements under various pseudonyms. He applied for membership at Magnum Photos under the name Mao Xiaohu.

 

And while Lu once said it didn’t matter who the photographer was that took the pictures (good or bad), it is hard to ignore and not attribute to him his immense body of work, namely the ‘Trilogy’ series which took 15 years to complete. First in the trilogy were Lu’s photographs of patients at China’s mental hospitals titled ‘The Forgotten People, the state of Chinese psychiatric wards’.

 

This was followed by a documentary of the catholic church in China and pilgrimages made by its followers. The last were photographs of peasants in Tibet called ‘Four Seasons’, rumoured to be made whilst Lu was on the run from ‘unfriendlies’. In 2009, Lu also made controversial photographs of prisoners in Northern Myanmar camps.

Photo report's insight:

"Human lives should not be labeled. Labels cover our eyes and make many things invisible to us," Lu Nan said.


Legendary Chinese photographer Lu Nan shook the world with his pictures of people living on the edge of despair.

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Best works | Photographer: ANDERS PETERSEN

Best works | Photographer: ANDERS PETERSEN | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Anders Petersen is noted for his intimate and personal documentary-style black-and-white photographs. He studied photography under Christer Stromholm in Sweden, 1966-1967. In 1967, he started to photograph the late-night regulars (prostitutes, transvestites, drunks, lovers, drug addicts) in a bar in Hamburg, Germany, named Café Lehmitz, and continued that project for three years. His photobook of the same name was published eight years later, in 1978, by Schirmer/Mosel in Germany, and then appeared in France (1979) and Sweden (1982). Café Lehmitz has since become regarded as a seminal book in the history of European photography.One of the photos from this series was later used as the cover art for Tom Waits' 1985 album Rain Dogs.

 

In 1970, he co-founded SAFTRA, the Stockholm group of photographers, with Kenneth Gustavsson. At the same time, he taught at Christer Stromholm's school. He has been director of the Göteborg School of Photography and Film. He began to photograph for magazines, and he continued his personal photo diary work, which continues to this day. He has photographed for extensive periods of time in prisons, mental asylums, and homes for old people.

 

In 1978, Petersen received a grant from the Swedish Authors' Foundation. In 2003, he was elected Photographer of the Year at the Recontres d'Arles. In 2007, he was one of four finalists for the £30,000 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.

Petersen has published more than 20 books, mostly in Sweden, and has had solo and group exhibitions throughout Europe and Asia.

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Syrian refugees in Iraq | Photographer: Andy Spyra

Syrian refugees in Iraq | Photographer: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

"With the civil war ongoing, Syria's Christians have, just as their brethren in Iraq, been caught in the crossfire: endangered and largely forgotten, they have become victims of someone else’s war. At the time of writing, only the Christians in the north-eastern Kurdish areas are still living in considerable safe conditions. The town of Qamishli, unofficial capital of the syrian Kurds and located directly at the turkish-syrian border has become one of the last safe havens for Syria's Christians and will be the focus of my documentation." - Andy Spyra

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The Rape of a Nation | Photojournalist: Marcus Bleasdale

The Rape of a Nation | Photojournalist: Marcus Bleasdale | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) is home to the deadliest war in the world today. An estimated 5.4 million people have died since 1998, the largest death toll since the Second World War, according to the International Rescue Committee (IRC).

IRC reports that as many as 45,000 people die each month in the Congo. Most deaths are due to easily preventable and curable conditions, such as malaria, diarrhea, pneumonia, malnutrition, and neonatal problems and are byproducts of a collapsed health care system and a devastated economy.

 

The people living in the mining towns of eastern Congo are among the worst off. Militia groups and government forces battle on a daily basis for control of the mineral-rich areas where they can exploit gold, coltan, cassiterite and diamonds.

 

After successive waves of fighting and ten years of war, there are no hospitals, few roads and limited NGO and UN presence because it is too dangerous to work in many of these regions. The West’s desire for minerals and gems has contributed to a fundamental breakdown in the social structure.

Photo report's insight:

Marcus Bleasdale was born in the UK to an Irish family, in 1968.  He grew up in the north of England and initially studied economics and started work as an investment banker. Although he was a director in a large international bank he resigned in the mid 1990s and began to travel through the Balkans with his camera.

 

He returned to study photojournalism at the prestigious London School, during which time he won the Ian Parry, Young photographer Award for his work on the conflict in Sierra Leone. He has established himself as one of the worlds leading documentary photographers concentrating on Conflict and Human Rights.

 

He has been awarded many of the worlds highest honors for his work and continues to highlight the effects of conflict on society. He is a member of the photo agency VII. He lives with his wife Karin Beate in Oslo, Norway.

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Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ

Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Albania is a small country in the heart of the Balkans. Despite its rich culture, people outside do generally not know much about it. It is also my homeland, the place of my early childhood. I grew up seperated from it, and returned later to pick up the threads that were left behind. 

What I found was modernity and tradition living together. I traveled a lot and started to know my birthplace, the people, their mentality, and their traditions. I felt very welcome, and was fascinated by all the people I met. They were kind, friendly and curious about my work.

 

I made this journey together with my wife. When people realized we were a couple, they were very open, they welcomed us inside their homes and extended wishes, blessings and congratulations. Marriage is very important in Albania. Everyone has to get married, it is considered to make men stronger and more respected in society.

 

In this photographic project I would like to show the everyday lives of Albanian people – the big picture, as well as the small, seemingly insignificant moments. What impressed me most was the strong family union, the connection among people. I found it everywhere – in married young couples and their babies, at a funeral ceremony where relatives shared their pain, at a wedding party, or when a son accompanied his father at work. I didn’t see any lonely people. - 

ENRI CANAJ
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Mutazioni | Fine art photographer: Gian Luca Groppi

Mutazioni | Fine art photographer: Gian Luca Groppi | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Gian Luca Groppi is a modern storyteller, who mixes cards and genres, giving his works a caustic lyricism that deliberately does not offer solutions or panaceas, but is rather an attempt at trying to shake us from widespread social and emotional inertia.” And here he is again the "storyteller", who brings together in this exhibition years of works that he himself calls "his only children." 

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BREATH | Fine art photographer: Tomohide Ikeya

BREATH | Fine art photographer: Tomohide Ikeya | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"BREATH

I only became aware of the existence of life and death after connecting deeply to the world of water. This happened long before I started photography: by chance, I was invited to go diving, and when I saw that underwater world it captured me at once. The various phenomena and life forms which exist only in the water and the beautiful play of water and light brought me a strong sense of elation and excitement. 

 

In that world, it is difficult to walk as you would on the ground, and weather conditions can sometimes prevent you from entering it at all. Training and careful preparation are necessary. 

 

Above all, though, there is a limit to the number of breaths you can take. Among the many restrictions that exist in this world, this work focuses on “BREATH,” the most essential factor. Breathing is indispensable to us; it repeats continually during our life, and we consider death to be the point at which breathing stops. Usually, breath is invisible, and I think it never registers in our consciousness.

 

By separating ourselves from this phenomenon, which is so close to our own lives, we can consider its essence and value. 

 

This occurs in the water. When we are covered in water—a kind of death—the fear inside of us comes to the surface. Beyond this, the condition of not being able to breathe reveals our attachment to life. I capture this entirely unpredictable scene of struggle.

 

 

I superimpose this highly restrictive scene onto human “life.” People encounter all kinds of troubles during their lives. Even if someone knocks down a barrier preventing them from doing something with their own hands, this will not change the fundamental essence of our own limitations. It is necessary to live together with such difficulty.

 

Perhaps the essence of life, granted to everyone, is to live while struggling against death. Math or science can’t change this. Life is not just about visible beauty, but also about true strength, which we have from birth."- Tomohide Ikeya

 
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South Sudan | Photographer: Marco Crob

South Sudan | Photographer: Marco Crob | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

United Nations, 5 April 2013 - After decades of war South Sudan is contaminated with thousands of deadly unexploded bombs and landmines. These explosives threaten the lives and livelihoods of South Sudan's inhabitants, and are still an impediment to development, peace and stability. Emmy award-winning photographer Marco Grob travels to South Sudan to photograph the Mundari tribesmen as they roam vast plains in search of grazing land for their cattle. Here is an inside look into the creation of these stunning photographs.

Photo report's insight:

 

Award-winning photographer Marco Grob is making his mark in advertising and editorial circles with his high-impact fashion and portrait imagery. To satisfy his high-end commercial clients—Adidas, Tag Heuer, BBC, ARD, UBS, Nike, and Louis Vuitton—and editorial clients—GQ, Vanity Fair, Marie Claire, Elle, Vogue, Glamour, Cosmopolitan, and Zeit Magazin—New York-based, Swiss-born Grob has relied on Hasselblad equipment exclusively throughout his career.

 
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Qajar | Photographer: Shadi Ghadirian

Qajar | Photographer: Shadi Ghadirian | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Her Qajar Series (1998-2001) consists of small studio portraits of women dressed in the nineteenth-century Qajar style. Many of the women photographed are Ghadirian's friends and family. The backgrounds of these portraits resemble those found in photographic studios of that period. However, the artist has added some modern anomalies or dissonances, such as a mountain bike, a newspaper, or a Pepsi-Cola can. Ghadirian plays with these juxtapositions and contrasts, thus expressing the difficulties women face in Iran today - torn between tradition and the modernity of globalization. These composed portraits depict women unsure to which era they belong.

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Karczeby | photographer: Adam Pańczuk

Karczeby | photographer: Adam Pańczuk | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Karczebs
In one of the dialects spoken in the east of Poland, which is a mixture of Polish and Belorussian, people strongly attached to the soil they had been cultivating for generetations were called "Karczebs". With their bare hands Karczebs cleared forests in order to grow crops. The word Karczeb was also used to describe what remains after a tree is cut down - a trunk with roots, which remains stuck in the ground. This also applied to people - it was not easy for the authorities to root them out from their land, even in the Stalinism times. The price they paid for their attachment to their soil was often their freedom or life. After death, hurried nearby their farmland, a Karczeb himself became the soil, later cultivated by his descendants.

Photo report's insight:

In Karczeby, Warsaw-based photographer Adam Panczuk captures intimate portraits of Polish farmers and their connection and respect for the land they cultivate. Deeply rooted, steady and still, these are a people with the land in their blood and bones, defined by a livelihood built in nature.

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Under the skin | Photographer: Maciej Pisuk

Under the skin | Photographer: Maciej Pisuk | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The inhabitants of Warsaw consider Brzeska Street, the very core of North Praga, the most neglected and dangerous district in the city (in my opinion the greatest local problem is stigmatization of the people living in the area). I would like to present you portraits of the street’s residents, my neighbors, acquaintances, friends, people among whom I lived for so many years. The pictures taken in this place constitute the vast majority of my photographic work so far.
I only photograph people who I stay in close touch with. The pictures are a result of the long process where the release of the shutter is essentially an element of little meaning.

 

The protagonists of my photographs possess something unusual: they have faces. I could risk and state that today almost nobody shows their face and there are only a few people who still have them. The face disappears under layers of masks, which are adjusted to the roles that we are forced to play. We change our masks as easily as we change our identities. In public, we only present the image that we shape according to our needs. Our contacts stop being direct. Sometimes we communicate with each other but we are not able to encounter. I like thinking of my pictures as testimonies of the encounters and I count on them to convey a particle of the experience I took part in.

Photo report's insight:

A graduate of the screenwriting course at the State Academy of Film, TV and Theatre in Lodz. Works as a screenwriter. The winner of prizes and awards on Polish and international photography competitions, among others: 2nd Prize at BZ WBK Press Foto 2006 (category: society), 1st Prize at ‘Warsaw Autumn of Photography’ 2007, 1st prize in the category of Photojournalism Non-Pro-People/Personality at PX3 Prix de la Photographie Paris 2008 Photo Competition, 2nd prize at BZ WBK Press Foto 2010 (category: portrait), Stockholm Photography Week 2012 – The prize for the best portfolio.
For a few years he has been working on a photographical documentary project concerning the inhabitants of the area of Praga in Warsaw.

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Children’s dreams | Photographer: Arthur Tress

Children’s dreams | Photographer: Arthur Tress | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

For his 1960s project on children’s dreams, legendary photographer Arthur Tress visualizes the subconscious fears of the innocent mind. While working with educator Richard Lewis of The Touchstone Center, he observed an exercise in which young people were asked to construct poems and paintings of their dreams; inspired, he began collaborating with children to create haunting silver gelatin photographs.

Influenced in part by the concept of Jungian archetypes, the images represent both the anxieties of the individual and the collective dread of the transformative decade. Here, domestic life and its mundane chores cease to provide comfort, and the home—and by extension, the mother figure herself— becomes irreversibly corrupted and decayed. Uprooted literally and figuratively from the safe space of wakefulness, the children must navigate a landscape riddled with a perversion that they do not yet comprehend.

As the virtues of childhood fade the reveal the sins of a hopelessly adult world, the threat of punishment and humiliation is ever-present, in the form of a dunce cap or in a vengeful flood brought by some unknowable deity. Ultimately, the impulse to grow and mature with the times is met with the irresistible urge to retreat, to pinch oneself and to awake from a nightmare that seems inescapable.

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LIFE | Photographer: Junku Nishimura

LIFE | Photographer: Junku Nishimura | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Junku Nishimura live in small coal-mining village in the Yamaguchi Prefecture. His father is now old and Junku’s dream was to pass the last years with him growing and harvesting rice in their family paddy fields. He had left years ago to become a salaryman in big city Japan.

 

Anyone who knows Junku knows he has three great loves – Photography, Music and Whiskey. He found his love for music and whiskey while moonlighting as a DJ in bars serving customers from the US Military Base. He found photography while snap-shooting his blue collar peers in his early days in Japan’s building industry.

 

A friend of Junku’s recently got married and invited him to the wedding ceremony. He asked if it was okay to go without a suit because he didn’t own one. He quit his suit for a camera years ago. The friend replied “Yes, as long as you don’t smell.” Junku showed up, with his signature, heavily stitched and patched fisherman hat. Vintage Junku!

 

I’ve always believed the notion that every photograph is a portrait of the photographer. Here is a selection of Junku’s photographs of Japan – a portrait from a Larrikin Ex-salaryman.

Photo report's insight:
More from Junku Nishimura: www.flickr.com/photos/junku-newcleus
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Trading to Extinction | Photojournalist: Patrick Brown

Trading to Extinction | Photojournalist: Patrick Brown | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Most people hear the term “poaching,” and they think of hunters gunning down endangered species like elephants and rhinos on the plains of Africa. But in many ways the heart of the illegal wildlife trade is not in Africa, but in Asia. It’s in rising countries like China, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia where the demand for illegal wildlife products is strongest, driving the hunting and the trafficking. And it’s in Asia where poaching is still going on in the forests of countries like Burma and Laos, in the last scraps of wilderness in one of the most densely populated parts of the world. Every year it’s estimated that up to 30,000 primates, 5 million birds, 10 million reptile skins and 500 million tropical fish are bought and sold in Asia.

 

That bloody trade is revealed by Patrick Brown’s stark black-and-white photographs, published in his new book, Trading to Extinction. The Bangkok-based Brown spent more than 10 years documenting the underbelly of the illegal wildlife trade in Asia, from ill-equipped rangers patrolling the forests of Thailand to markets in southern China, jam-packed with threatened species. He shows the shadowy smuggling routes that take wildlife products across poorly guarded borders, and shines a spotlight on the sheer inhumanity of man’s treatment of majestic animals like the endangered Indochinese tiger. Brown prowls the markets of Bangkok, where massive ivory elephant tusks—almost surely taken by a poacher—sit in a store window, mute symbols of a murderous trade. Another photograph shows a pile of tiger and snow leopard skins—worth three-quarters ofa million dollars—seized in Thailand’s Chitwan National Park.

 

Money is what drives the illegal wildlife trade, which is now worth as much as $10 billion globally. Brown notes that a poacher who kills a rhino and removes its horn in India gets $350, but that same horn will sell for $1,000 in a nearby market town, and as much as $370,000 once it reaches dealers in Hong Kong, Beijing or the Middle East. It’s little wonder that international criminal syndicates have gotten into the wildlife trade, which is now estimated to be the fifth most lucrative illegal enterprise in the world. Some of that money flows to international terrorists as well, making wildlife trafficking a security threat, as well as a conservation one.

 

The good news is that the world is beginning to get serious about wildlife trafficking. On Feb. 11 the U.S. announced a new national strategy for combating poaching, as well as a ban on commercial imports and exports of ivory. Last week British Prime Minister David Cameron hosted the London Conference on the Illegal Wildlife Trade, the highest-level summit ever on wildlife trafficking. Bringing a halt to poaching will require a commitment from developed nations like the U.S. and England. But as Patrick Brown’s moving photographs show, the battle will be fought in Asia.

Photo report's insight:

Patrick Brown is a multi award-winning English photographer based in Thailand. His work focuses on critical issues across the Asia region. Trading to Extinction is available through publisher Dewi Lewis.


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Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold

Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

A body, used as a canvas, every inch of skin filled with sacred text and figures of mythical creatures, all forming a protective shield. A boxer, a monk, a construction worker, a police man, a soldier, a taxi driver, a shipyard worker, a shaman, a tattoo master; men, women and their inked protection from evil spirits and bad luck. Enter the world of Thailand’s spiritual “yantra” tattoo tradition. - Cedric Arnold

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Sunday Morning Sports | Photographer: Salvi Danes

Sunday Morning Sports | Photographer: Salvi Danes | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Countless photographs have been captured along Brooklyn’s Coney Island and Brighton Beach. From Lisette Model and Weegee’s famous images of bathers on into the present, sun revelers have been an endless source of inspiration to photographers. Spanish photographer Salvi Danés takes us tohis Coney Island in a series he calls Sunday Morning Sports. In one image, a bather descends down jagged rocks into the water, his body engulfed by the textures around him—water, rock, light and body becoming one. The men ofSunday Morning Sports, active and invigorated, are less worried about life than they are about living. We recently caught up with Danés to find out more about this community.


“They are neighbors who have always lived together in “Barceloneta”, a neighborhood in Barcelona. They are acquaintances, friends, even relatives, who since they were teenagers, have spent their time having fun doing exercise outdoors and enjoying the sun that the beach offers them.” - Salvi Danes

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Pierric Chalois's curator insight, February 11, 2014 3:06 AM

Les sportifs du dimanche....

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Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders

Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In 2000 I was travelling through Russia and other parts of the former Soviet Union developing a project on the transmission of HIV through intravenous drug use. I stumbled upon a group of young kids who were being chased from a McDonalds restaurant by a very aggressive restaurant manager. I intervened to prevent the manager beating the kids on the street. The kids had been removing leftovers from empty tables. This act led me into an underground world where young children live and die in the most squalid and horrible conditions I have ever experienced. Orphans, runaways, wee broken souls fending for themselves in a cruel and unforgiving world.- David Gillanders

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Ten Thousand Scrolls | Photographer: Kirk Crippens

Ten Thousand Scrolls | Photographer: Kirk Crippens | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
“Traveling ten thousand miles is better than reading ten thousand scrolls” is a Chinese proverb that speaks to the heart of Kirk Crippens’ recent portrait project. He was hungry for knowledge of China that he couldn’t get just by reading, so he traveled from his home in the East Bay area to the small city Chinese city of Lishui. With just two words of Mandarin (Ni hao, which means “hello”), he managed to meet hundreds of people who allowed him to photograph them and who took him into their homes and into their confidence. Crippens is one of three photographers (along with Maggie Preston and David Wolf) participating in the 2012 RayKo artists-in-residence program. A joint exhibition is currently on view at the RayKo Photo Center in San Francisco through December 14th, 2012.
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Wanawake | Photographer: Martina BACIGALUPO

Wanawake | Photographer: Martina BACIGALUPO | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Every minute in the world a woman dies of childbirth. 99% of these women live in developing countries. More than half of them live in sub-Saharan Africa. For every maternal death, 20 women suffer pregnancy-related injuries, infections or diseases and, in some case, long term disabilities. The majority of maternal deaths and disabilities can be prevented through access to basic health-care services during pregnancy and delivery.

The more affected are women living in poverty, who lack the decision-making power and the financial resources to access basic health care.
The lack of progress in reducing maternal mortality highlights the low price placed on the lives of these women and testifies to their limited public voice.
In the urban western world a woman reaches a hospital in less than 7 minutes. In the Congo women who manage to reach a health center have walked, pregnant and alone for hours, often for days." - Martina Bacigalupo

Photo report's insight:

Martina Bacigalupo was born in 1978 in Genova.

She is member of Agence Vu in Paris.

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Zahida's curator insight, December 5, 2013 10:10 PM

This article interests me because of the major differeances in the avaerage time it takes for women to get to the hospital when they become pregnent. In the urban western world a women gets to the hospital while in the Congo, women get to the hospital after walking for hours or even days. Many people want to help in a specific way want to donate to a cause that they know that they can directly impact people.  The half the sky book concentrates on specific examples, while this article concentrates on one aspect of the overall goal that the Half the Sky book is trying to promote. 

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Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"The Narmada River project created by the Indian Government involves the construction of 30 large, 135 medium and 3000 small dams to harness the waters of the Narmada river and its tributaries. The proponents of the dam claim that this plan would provide large amounts of water and electricity which are required for development purposes. Opponent of the dam question the basic assumptions of the Narmada Valley Development Plan and believe that its plan is unjust and inequitable…" - Samuel Aranda

Photo report's insight:

Aranda began to work as a photographer for newspapers El País and El Periódico de Catalunya at the age of 19. Two years later he traveled to the Middle East, where he covered the Israeli–Palestinian conflict for the Spanish news agency EFE.

In 2004 Aranda begun working for AFP, covering stories in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The photojournalist association ANIGP-TV awarded Arandas feature documentary about African immigrants trying to reach Europe with the Spanish National Award of Photography. Since 2006 he is working as a freelance photojournalist.

In 2011 Aranda covered the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen. In February 2012 he was awarded the World Press Photo of the Year 2011. The winning picture shows an a woman embracing her son, wounded during clashes against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen, part of the Arab Spring.

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Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres

Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Fernando Moleres was born in Bilbao, Spain in 1963. He began work as a nurse in his home village, traveling in 1987 to pursue that calling in Nicaragua, during the Sandinista period. It was there that Moleres began to appreciate the value of photography and to teach himself how to do it. During the early 1990s, he combined nursing work with long periods traveling and doing photo projects, such as Children at Work, which lasted several years and took him to many countries. His photos have appeared in a number of international publications, such as Stern, Le Figaro Magazine, Le Monde 2, La Republica, Io Donna, The Independent and The Sunday Times Magazine. Moleres has published two books and has had more than 20 solo exhibitions worldwide. His honors include a Picture of the Year 2011, two previous World Press Photo prizes (in 2008 and 1998), a W. Eugene Smith Grant, a Erna and Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant, and a Lucia Award 2012 Deeper Perspectives Award, among others. Moleres is now based in Barcelona.

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One of the most touching images in history | Photojournalist: Joe O'Donnell

One of the most touching images in history | Photojournalist: Joe O'Donnell | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Stoic Japanese Orphan, Standing At Attention Having Brought His Dead Younger Brother To A Cremation Pyre, Nagasaki, By American Photographer, Joe O’Donnell 1945"

 

Although his name is unknown, we know a lot about him. The child was about 10 years old and survived the crash. Unfortunately, as a result of an air raid killed all his loved ones. Orphaned boy, survived along with his younger brother, which he wore tied back. The child had bowed his head and seemed to be very strongly sleep. His older brother, erect, without shoes and with a straight face, he came to the vicinity of the funeral pile on which the corpses were burned victims.

 

He stood there a few minutes, when finally went to him the man in the white mask, which is responsible for burning the bodies. The silence began to take off attached to the back of the boy child. He grabbed them by the arms and legs and put on the stack. Boy's little brother was already dead.

 

That direction by a photo of Joe O'Donnell's situation, a photographer working for the U.S. Marines. When in 1945 he was sent to Hiroshima and Nagasaki, by documenting the bombing and the U.S. occupation, he was only 23 years old. The air raid destroyed cities nearby spent up to 6 months. Those events permanently etched in his memory.

 

O'Donnell saw the whole situation and observed the behavior of the boy who brought his brother to burn his body. When the child was buried at the stake, the boy stood still and watched the flames. His face remained impassive, but you could see that little hero biting his lower lip so hard that it started to bleed. Then he turned and walked away in silence.

Photo report's insight:

Joseph (Joe) Roger O'Donnell (May 7, 1922 – August 9, 2007) was an American documentarian, photojournalist and a photographer for the United States Information Agency. Born in Johnstown, Pennsylvania, his most famous work was documenting photographically the immediate aftermath of the atomic bomb explosions at Nagasaki and Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945 and 1946 as a Marine photographer. He died in Nashville, Tennessee.

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Comment rendre une photo poétique | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Comment rendre une photo poétique | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Concernant le traiment de la couleur ou du noir et blanc, voilà une photo qui m'a posée problème au départ. Pour cette photo-ci, l'ensemble des lignes verticales, de la forme triangulaire des deux sujets, les rectangles constitués par la grille, le panneau publicitaire  JCDecaux et le bâtiment lui-même aurait perdu de leur potentialité poétique si la photo avait été en couleur. En outre, le traitement noir et blanc accentue l'intemporalité et l'irréalité de l'image, ou tout au moins une certaine ambiguïté qui ne m'est pas déplaisante. Et l’ambiguïté d'une photographie n'en constitue-il pas le principal atout esthétique?

Photo report's insight:

En poésie, en chanson, en littérature, en musique, la répétition donne du rythme, elle ponctue poétiquement l’énoncé. Ici, l’écho visuel relayé par la récurrence des formes géométriques, de mon propre point de vue, nourrie la cohérence de cette photographie. En prenant l’exemple de la photo ci-dessus, la somme d’indices plastiques connectés entre eux, comme les lignes verticales, les cadres rectangulaires, le disque formé par le panneau d’interdiction, sont autant de signal rythmique qui suggère une relation riche en interprétations dont je vous laisse la liberté d’en  trouver les clés selon votre culture personnelle ou vos émotions propres.

 

L’œil est en effet captivé par la répétition des motifs qui, stylistiquement, introduit des relations supplémentaires comme l’écho visuel de la passante en jilbab et celle en sari sur l’affiche. Ainsi, les répétition visuelles rapprochés par leur signifiant et leur signifié étant confronté : ils deviennent des point-clefsde l’image, comme ils le seraient, en d’autres termes des mots clés d’une poésie...

 

 

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