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BLACK AND WHITE
Wonderful black and white photography
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Minor Miners | Photographer: Suzanne Lee

Minor Miners | Photographer: Suzanne Lee | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Minor Miners is my ongoing investigation into child labour in Indian coalmines and broader socio-economic realities that force families to use their children as full-time breadwinners doing hard labour. I explore not just the day-to-day conditions of life imposed on India's weakest and most vulnerable, but also the extensive socio-economic institutions that create these dire situations. India has the largest number of child labourers under the age of 14 in the world. With an estimated 12.6million children engaged in hazardous occupations, India's seemingly impressive economic growth of hides the crushing poverty that remain a harsh reality for millions of her children. I have been photographing the working/living conditions of child miners along India’s ‘coal-belt’ and will continue by traveling to the children’s origins, probing the core desperations they confronted, pushing them to taking these steps. Problems like displacement and loss of livelihood in their homelands can lead illiterate, unskilled communities into extreme poverty, driving them to migrate to nearby industrial towns and finally to such desperate measures as selling their children to the mining mafia.

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Noir & blanc | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Noir & blanc | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I discovered photography when I became a father in 2008. Yes, it is the birth of my daughter that led me to buy my first camera, a Canon 40D. It is in 2010 that I had for the first prestigious client, the Courts of Auditors, a quasi-judicial body of the French government, to photograph the First President, Didier Migaud.

This little overview to the past, duotone black and white is necessary for me as a stylistic evidence. This gallery is not complete, more pictures will be added gradually.

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Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold

Sacred Ink | Photographer: Cedric Arnold | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

A body, used as a canvas, every inch of skin filled with sacred text and figures of mythical creatures, all forming a protective shield. A boxer, a monk, a construction worker, a police man, a soldier, a taxi driver, a shipyard worker, a shaman, a tattoo master; men, women and their inked protection from evil spirits and bad luck. Enter the world of Thailand’s spiritual “yantra” tattoo tradition. - Cedric Arnold

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Arrivals and Departures | Photographer: Jacob Aue Sobol

Arrivals and Departures | Photographer: Jacob Aue Sobol | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"It was a trip I had always wanted to take; The legendary journey along the Trans Siberian Railway.

Denmark, my native country, you can cross in five hours by train, but in Russia the distances are huge.

I was curious if the connection between people and places would feel different considering the fact that I would pass every tree, every house and every village on my way to Beijing.

The first chock came already when I entered the train. It was completely empty.

 

The whole idea of the project had been to meet people on the train and make intimate stories from the train compartments. But riding this ghost-train, I had to change the concept:

The intimate work had to come from my encounters with people in the cities and the train became the read thread connecting Moscow, Ulaanbaartar and Beijing.

On the train I ended up with my camera glued to the window photographing the change of landscape as we were let along the russian forests, the mongolian desert and through the mountains to Beijing.

 

But it was not only Russia, Mongolia and China that was unknown land to me - so was my equipment. It was my first time using a digital camera. Everything was new, but then again, my ambition is always the same; to use the camera as a tool to create contact, closeness and intimacy. I want to meet people, to connect with the cities, to make the places mine, even if it’s just for a short while.

I had the greatest experience in Mongolia, when I ran into a group of Mongolian hunters who invited me to join them on a trip through the mountains that surround Ulaanbaatar.

This reminded me of my life in Greenland. When I  was 23 I lived in a small settlement of the East Coast of Greenland, where I was trained as a hunter. The relation you create to nature as a hunter has had a big influence on my life and my work.

Meeting the Mongolian hunter, I immediately felt like putting the camera on a shelf and picking up the riffle. When he shot and slaughtered a deer, we drank the warm blood and ate the raw liver together." - Jacob Aue Sobol

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The 13th floor | Photographer: David Gillanders

The 13th floor | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Paul Mann, and Marie Ward are living in desperate poverty in one of the remaining high rise block of flats in the Gorbals, Glasgow. The council accommodation they live in, which is scheduled for demolition, is riddled with dampness causing illness to their children. Both Marie and Paul are long term, third generation unemployed and are completely dependent on the state, not just for benefit but for help in caring for their 4 children. The family have since be relocated to a newly built townhouse in the Gorbals but continue to struggle." - David Gillanders

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Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ

Albania-A Homecoming | Photographer: ENRI CANAJ | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Albania is a small country in the heart of the Balkans. Despite its rich culture, people outside do generally not know much about it. It is also my homeland, the place of my early childhood. I grew up seperated from it, and returned later to pick up the threads that were left behind. 

What I found was modernity and tradition living together. I traveled a lot and started to know my birthplace, the people, their mentality, and their traditions. I felt very welcome, and was fascinated by all the people I met. They were kind, friendly and curious about my work.

 

I made this journey together with my wife. When people realized we were a couple, they were very open, they welcomed us inside their homes and extended wishes, blessings and congratulations. Marriage is very important in Albania. Everyone has to get married, it is considered to make men stronger and more respected in society.

 

In this photographic project I would like to show the everyday lives of Albanian people – the big picture, as well as the small, seemingly insignificant moments. What impressed me most was the strong family union, the connection among people. I found it everywhere – in married young couples and their babies, at a funeral ceremony where relatives shared their pain, at a wedding party, or when a son accompanied his father at work. I didn’t see any lonely people. - 

ENRI CANAJ
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Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres

Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Fernando Moleres was born in Bilbao, Spain in 1963. He began work as a nurse in his home village, traveling in 1987 to pursue that calling in Nicaragua, during the Sandinista period. It was there that Moleres began to appreciate the value of photography and to teach himself how to do it. During the early 1990s, he combined nursing work with long periods traveling and doing photo projects, such as Children at Work, which lasted several years and took him to many countries. His photos have appeared in a number of international publications, such as Stern, Le Figaro Magazine, Le Monde 2, La Republica, Io Donna, The Independent and The Sunday Times Magazine. Moleres has published two books and has had more than 20 solo exhibitions worldwide. His honors include a Picture of the Year 2011, two previous World Press Photo prizes (in 2008 and 1998), a W. Eugene Smith Grant, a Erna and Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant, and a Lucia Award 2012 Deeper Perspectives Award, among others. Moleres is now based in Barcelona.

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The Jangs | Photographer: Michael Jang

The Jangs | Photographer: Michael Jang | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

This time, I see intimate and hilarious shots of Michael's own extended family, taken in California in the 1970s while he was a student at Cal Arts. These pictures are far from your average family snapshots; in fact, they were just purchased by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. 

Photo report's insight:

Michael Jang is an established photographer who has always had an eye for recognizing and capturing the defining moments of his generation. Well known for his commercial photography and portraiture of notable figures from the 70s and 80s, such as William Burroughs, Alice Walker, Jimi Hendrix, Frank Sinatra, and many others, Jang’s work is now being looked at in a new light. These photos can be found in Jang's book, Summer Weather, which was released last May from Owl & Tiger Books.

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The coalfields of Jharia | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel

The coalfields of Jharia | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In Jharia, in the federal state of Jharkhand, around 600,000 people live in the middle of one of India's biggest coal mining areas. There's nothing in it for most of them. Quite the opposite: the soil, the water and the air are now contaminated, of all things in an area that was previously rich in woodland. 
The story of Jharia is the story of how the greed for profit, vested interests and the thirst for power have prevailed and led to one of the areas richest in minerals in India remaining so economically backward. For the mining marginalises the poor and deepens social inequality in the name of economic development, from which mostly only metropolises like Delhi, Bangalore and Mumbai profit. 


Shortly after 1971, the coal mines were nationalised. Since then, their operator is the BCCL (Bharat Coking Coal Limited) which thus controls one of the biggest coal deposits in India and one of the biggest in the whole of Asia. BCCL conducts mainly opencast mining. Mostly illegally, since in 97% of the cases no licence has been granted. Opencast mining is more profitable than deep mining. The productivity and extracted quantities are significantly higher than in deep mining and cost less. In Jharia, coal is mined in the villages, next to the houses, in short, on people's doorsteps. Even on the streets, on railway lines, in the station itself, which is not a station any more, coal is mined. 


Really, the mined area should be filled with sand and water afterwards, so it can be cultivated again. For cost reasons, however, this never happens, which leads to the coal seams coming into contact with oxygen and catching fire. India has the most coal blazes worldwide. BCCL representatives estimate there are 67 fires in Jharia alone.

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Some kind of divine | Photographer: Ruth Kaplan

Some kind of divine | Photographer: Ruth Kaplan | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"These photographs were taken in Pentecostal, Baptist and other churches that are known for physical, movement-oriented ritual. I selected these groups as a metaphor for the aspect of all religions, which promise a fairy tale, and require surrender to the unknown from their practitioners; the human need for transcendence seems innate. Religion provides a construct in which people attempt to claim this experience. I felt it was important to try and photograph these intangible, elusive moments of personal surrender and what I perceive to be dangerous ideologies. At times I felt like taking a shower after hearing hateful ideas disguised as morality, yet at other times, I felt myself seduced by a service or a sermon. This project is an attempt to raise these contradictions and the questions that they pose."-Ruth Kaplan

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PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto

PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Article 18 of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Cambodia: “the state will protect the rights of children, particularly the right to life, education, and protection during times of war, in addition to protection against economic and sexual exploitation”.

At present Cambodia has around 14 million inhabitants, a number which has increased favourably in recent years due to the period of relative peace the country has experienced since 1993.  Depending on the time of year, the capital, Phnom Penh, has between two and three million inhabitants.

In a country where 81% of the population gain their livelihood from agriculture, the climate determines everything.  However, the extreme poverty in rural areas, the non-existence of technological farming, climatic instability, etc., are all factors which force the population to emigrate to the city in hope of finding a better life.  Unfortunately, what usually happens in these cases is that life does not become better, but the complete opposite.  Due to the parents’ inability to look after all the family members, Cambodian boys and girls have the tendency to start fending for themselves from a very early age.

 

 In the capital, approximately half the children and teenagers who look after themselves have arrived alone from surrounding provinces, with only a few coins in their pockets.  Some of the children will return to their villages after a few days, weeks, or even months.  Others will spend so long on the street that it becomes impossible to return, simply because they forget who they are and where they come from.  At their roots there is always a completely unstructured family unit, in most cases because of extreme poverty, AIDS, or alcoholism which almost always transforms into domestic violence.

Organised into small groups, the bonds that the children build amongst themselves are strong, deep and sincere; as primitive as the survival instinct itself.  Malnutrition, illness, drug abuse, sexual harassment from tourists, traffic…these are all daily threats that the children face.  Perhaps, above all of those, the lack of affection from society, the feeling of abandonment and the shortage of self-confidence could be seen as the strongest and most pressing threat of all.  Forgotten by their politicians who are immersed in dismantling their country in the shortest possible time, at the moment the only valid option the children have to leave the street is to go through an NGO.  This, however, will never be the solution to the problem.

 

Photo report's insight:

Another link of photo documentary: http://www.fotovisura.com/user/MikeA/view/rue-24-phnom-penh-kampuchea

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SCHOOL FOR LESS FORTUNATE | Photographer: ALTAF QADRI

SCHOOL FOR LESS FORTUNATE | Photographer: ALTAF QADRI | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

07 November 2012

New Delhi, India

Every morning, children from nearby slums arrive in small groups, barefoot and carrying mats and brooms and start cleaning a portion of a land under a metro rail bridge, which will be their school for the rest of the morning. Rajesh Kumar Sharma, along with his friend, founded the free school for underprivileged children under a metro bridge a year ago. He teaches at least 45 children every day. Sharma, a 40-year-old father of three from Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous state, was forced to drop out of college in his third year due to financial difficulties. He didn't want other children to face the same difficulties, so he decided to start the free school.

 

He persuaded local laborers and farmers to allow their children to attend his school instead of working to add to the family income. He prepares these children for admission to government schools and hopes to equip them with the tools necessary to overcome their poverty. Millions of dollars are given to fund the education of poor children in India, however it often doesn't reach them because of corruption and arduous administrative procedures.

Photo report's insight:

TECHNICAL INFORMATIONSHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 100F-STOP: 1.4FOCAL LENGTH: 50CAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II

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Rickshaw Wallahs | The Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy

Rickshaw Wallahs | The Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

" The government of Bengal had announced plans to completely ban the rickshaws, saying that the grueling work violates the pullers human rights, the argument was rejected by the rickshaw pullers with huge protests. Almost all of the pullers I spoke to were from the state of Bihar, one of India's poorest states. The rickshaws carry business people, live poultry, school children, the sick to the hospitals, fruit to the markets, and even prostitutes." - Tewfic El-Sawy

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I Am Georgia | Photographer: Dina Oganova

I Am Georgia |  Photographer: Dina Oganova | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

For photographer Dina Oganova, each and every aspect of her country is precious and unique. In her series I Am Georgia, Oganova chronicles the daily facets of the homeland she has always treasured. Here we see children at play, the elderly at prayer, and everyday familial celebrations.


Made up of only four million residents, Georgia has existed as a sovereign state for a little over a decade. Bordered by Russia, Turkey and the Black Sea, the country faced civil war the same year it declared independence from the Soviet Union.


A land of refugees and with a history of conflict, Georgia’s people attempt to hold on to traditions while plunging into the future. In this relatively new and foreign landscape, I Am Georgia is a personal and spirited testament to who the country is and to who it is becoming.

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Best works | Photographer: ANDERS PETERSEN

Best works | Photographer: ANDERS PETERSEN | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Anders Petersen is noted for his intimate and personal documentary-style black-and-white photographs. He studied photography under Christer Stromholm in Sweden, 1966-1967. In 1967, he started to photograph the late-night regulars (prostitutes, transvestites, drunks, lovers, drug addicts) in a bar in Hamburg, Germany, named Café Lehmitz, and continued that project for three years. His photobook of the same name was published eight years later, in 1978, by Schirmer/Mosel in Germany, and then appeared in France (1979) and Sweden (1982). Café Lehmitz has since become regarded as a seminal book in the history of European photography.One of the photos from this series was later used as the cover art for Tom Waits' 1985 album Rain Dogs.

 

In 1970, he co-founded SAFTRA, the Stockholm group of photographers, with Kenneth Gustavsson. At the same time, he taught at Christer Stromholm's school. He has been director of the Göteborg School of Photography and Film. He began to photograph for magazines, and he continued his personal photo diary work, which continues to this day. He has photographed for extensive periods of time in prisons, mental asylums, and homes for old people.

 

In 1978, Petersen received a grant from the Swedish Authors' Foundation. In 2003, he was elected Photographer of the Year at the Recontres d'Arles. In 2007, he was one of four finalists for the £30,000 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.

Petersen has published more than 20 books, mostly in Sweden, and has had solo and group exhibitions throughout Europe and Asia.

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Bangkok | Photographer: Jacob Aue Sobol

Bangkok | Photographer: Jacob Aue Sobol | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I came to Bangkok for the first time in the spring of 2008. It is a city that has one of the fastest growing economies in Asia, yet it is also a place where the gap between the poor and the rich is increasing rapidly.    

I found my interest in the sois, the narrow streets, which surround the muddy River of Chao Phraya, the street kids in Sukhumvit and the families who live by the old train track that runs through the slum of Klong Toey. This, as opposed to the fancy shopping area around Siam Square, is where people caught my attention - people I felt a connection with or an attraction towards, and who were willing to communicate with me or just share a brief moment of closeness. 

However, I could also often feel the distance between us, and so I often found myself in the role as the spectator photographing the constantly changing scenarios in the city. Underlined by the difference in language, race and social status, it was a continuous struggle to create an equal meeting. But when this succeeded, it was often in this encounter – on a one to one basis - that I got the feeling of the closeness and intimacy I was searching for.  - Jacob Aue Sobol

Photo report's insight:
Jacob is a member of Magnum Photos. Yossi Milo Gallery in New York, Rita Castelotte Gallery in Madrid and RTR Gallery in Paris also represent him. Jacob was born in Denmark, in 1976 and grew up in Brøndby Strand in the suburbs south of Copenhagen. He lived as an exchange student in Strathroy, Canada from 1994-95 and as a hunter and fisherman in Tiniteqilaaq, Greenland from 2000-2002. In Spring 2006 he moved to Tokyo, staying there 18 months before returning to Denmark in August 2008. He now lives and works in Copenhagen.
 
After studying at the European Film College, Jacob was admitted to Fatamorgana, the Danish School of Documentary and Art Photography in 1998. There he developed a unique, expressive style of black-and-white photography, which he has since refined and further developed. In the autumn of 1999 he went to live in the settlement Tiniteqilaaq on the East Coast of Greenland. Over the next three years he lived mainly in this township with his Greenlandic girlfriend Sabine and her family, living the life of a fisherman and hunter but also photographing. The resultant book Sabine was published in 2004 and the work was nominated for the 2005 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.

In the summer of 2005 Jacob traveled with a film crew to Guatemala to make a documentary about a young Mayan girl’s first journey to the ocean. The following year he returned by himself to the mountains of Guatemala where he met the indigenous family Gomez-Brito. He stayed with them for a month to tell the story of their everyday life. The series won the First Prize Award, Daily Life Stories, World Press Photo 2006. In 2006 he moved to Tokyo and during the next two years he created the images from his resent book I, Tokyo. The book was awarded the Leica European Publishers Award 2008 and published by Actes Sud (France), Apeiron (Greece), Dewi Lewis Publishing (Great Britain), Edition Braus (Germany), Lunwerg Editores (Spain), Peliti Associati (Italy) and Mets & Schilt (The Netherlands) In 2008 Jacob started working in Bangkok and in 2009 in Copenhagen. Both projects will be published as books in 2013. Jacob is currently working on the project Arrivals and Departures - a journey from Moscow to Beijing - in co-operation with Leica Camera.  
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Salt Water Tears | Photographer: Munem Wasif

Salt Water Tears | Photographer: Munem Wasif | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Every ecosystem has its fragile balance. That much we have already learnt. Scientists routinely now seek to document the excesses that will lead to imbalance, even where they can do nothing about them. And sometimes, just sometimes, legislation and implementation and eventually protection may follow.

In the far south-west of Bangladesh, Munem Wasif shows us just what these abstract-sounding paradigms mean in practice. Nobody knows certainly why the water levels are changing in the Bay of Bengal, but they are. In a famously low-lying country, more and more people are under threat of catastrophic flooding. Coastal erosion, too, is accelerating, a matter of grave concern in a country where (under the pressure of population) every inch of usable land is at a premium. 

Munem Wasif found a region where changes to a single measurable fact – salinity levels in the water table – can be seen to have affected every part of the matrix of balances. Salinity has risen. The old agriculture is no longer possible because the old plants simply can’t grow. Shrimping – a new industry – has grown up, largely for export, using fewer workers and threatening the livelihood of many others. Shrimping in turn exposes more land to salt or brackish water. Farmers are reduced to occasional labour. Established structures of work and the societies centred on work change and break down. 

Many people have to venture into the mangrove swamps of the Sundarbans (a national park on the Indian side of the border, but not yet on the Bangladeshi) to fish or to collect roofing materials which used to be available closer to hand. In the Sundarbans they are exposed to a terrifying catalogue of risk, including attack from dog sharks, crocodiles, king cobras and the Bengal tiger. Women (it’s always the women) have to go ever farther in search of fresh water. New diseases become frequent, obviously connected to all these changes, but not yet provably so. So it goes on, a kaleidoscope of interconnected shifts, not fully understood, and not half predictable with accuracy. 

Munem Wasif has not gone to this blighted region to show us the abstractions of climate-change experts or the theories of macro-economists. Photography deals in the particular, and this project deals in the very particular. Wasif is himself Bangladeshi. Not for him the flak-jacket, the adrenaline rush, and five hours in the red zone. These are his people, although not quite in his part of the country. The accent is different but the language is shared. Wasif in fact rented a motorcycle to complete this commission, and when he tells you the names of the people in the pictures it’s because he met them and heard them, and knew them a little. 

The pictures, then, are almost by definition subjective. Too much ink has been spilt trying to work out when and whether photographers tell the truth. These pictures are absolutely personal to Wasif, absolutely his expression of his sentiments. But that doesn’t stop them being also a remarkable – and true – document of what is happening in the interplay of some of the complex of variables in this corner of Bangladesh.

Photography reads big and small. Wasif shows you Johura Begum’s long arm reaching out to her husband as he dies of cancer of the liver, that simple tenderness is the only available healthcare in a village whose population are in desperate need. It’s a little tiny truth, certainly. The husband died, the woman lived on, widowed. The photographer was there, he knows. But it is also and at the same time a complex of many metaphors. There are many pictures like this because this scene has been played out so many times all over the world. It’s a picture ‘about’ infrastructure and financing, too, as well as morality and ethics. In another searing picture, containers of fresh water are dragged on foot in boats through clinging sterile mud. Shajhan Shiraj and his brothers from Gabura, we’re told, travel three hours in this kind of way every day. Stunted trees, clear water only in the distance, three men, three boats, and the keel-trail they etch in the mud. It’s not just a beautiful picture: the irony of boats travelling so painfully slowly by land with water as their only cargo is unimaginably painful. 

There is a powerful crossover in the way pictures work. Read these pictures only as little truths and they will wrench out your heart. Read them as big truths and they will drive you towards planning practical effort for change. you don’t need to know that Johura Begum’s husband was called Amer Chan to be moved to action by Wasif. 

We read about donor fatigue, compassion fatigue. Every viewer of these pictures will have at some point the sense of having seen them before. Salgado in the Sahel, just as shocking, maybe more. Very similar in feel and tonality. But it is not up to the photographers to provide us with new scenes. As long as those scenes are there and look the way they do, photographers will continue to show them to us. Some people will look at Wasif’s pictures here and call them derivative, and they’ll be right. But it isn’t fashion. There is not going to be a new length of trousers this season in the liver cancer business. Photographers can only do so much. If viewers are tired of being harrowed, tired of seeing these scenes one shouldn’t have to look at, perhaps we can understand that it’s the viewers who need to perk up their ideas, not the photographers. Munem Wasif, for one, is doing his bit. Now it’s up to us. 

– Francis Hodgson
Head of Photographs, Sotheby's
Chairman of Judges, Prix Pictet
From the essay Munem Wasif: Tiny Truths, Big Truths 

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Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders

Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In 2000 I was travelling through Russia and other parts of the former Soviet Union developing a project on the transmission of HIV through intravenous drug use. I stumbled upon a group of young kids who were being chased from a McDonalds restaurant by a very aggressive restaurant manager. I intervened to prevent the manager beating the kids on the street. The kids had been removing leftovers from empty tables. This act led me into an underground world where young children live and die in the most squalid and horrible conditions I have ever experienced. Orphans, runaways, wee broken souls fending for themselves in a cruel and unforgiving world.- David Gillanders

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Médina de Casablanca | Photographe Serge Bouvet

Médina de Casablanca | Photographe Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

La découverte de la soirée est encore une fois le travail photographique de Serge Bouvet. Ses reportages sont un délice pour les yeux, un apaisement de l’esprit et des sens puisque son regard vierge nous fait découvrir ces lieux que l’on a tendance à prendre pour du banal. C’est pour cette raison que l’on doit toujours changer de lieux, aller dans des endroits nouveaux à la fois sur le plan photographique que sur le plan des lumières. Serge Bouvet nous amène dans la médina de Casablanca avec un reportage en Noir/Blanc bien cisaillé. Imprégnez vous de ce travail et surtout bonne découverte.

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Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda

Ethinc Forced Relocation - Jahalin Bedouins | Photojournalist: Giuliano Camarda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Arab al-Jahalin is the biggest bedouin community that lives in the West Bank Area called E-1, part of the Area C, where Israel retains control over security as well as planning and zoning, and holds strategic significance for further expansion of illegal Israeli settlements.


The bedouins live in miserable shacks, without electricity or running water, grazing their sheeps between debris and dreaming of the flourishing desert of Beersheva, where they have been forcefully evicted, across the 1949 armistice lines by Israeli authorities. In the last 15 years the Bedouin communities have been subject to demolition, requisition of cattle, attacks by settlers, aimed to get away from the area.


But despite this, the communities have shown determination and unbelievable resilience, who led the Israeli military authorities to draw up a "plan of relocation" which ignore the aspirations, needs, traditions and the system of relations inherent in the Bedouin culture. The plan provides the deportation and a forced establishment of the Jahalin tribe next to the rubbish dump of Abu Dis. - Giuliano Camarda

Photo report's insight:

Giuliano Camarda is a freelance photographer since 2008.
He has worked in Bosnia Herzegovina developing several issues about the war aftermath. Actually he's working in the Occupied Palestinian Territories on a long term project. Mainly focused on projects with social and humanitarian aspects. He collaborated with NGOs such as CESVI, Caritas Italiana, La Carovana del sorriso, Vento di Terra. His works have been published on National Geographic Italia, Repubblica.it, Sky TG24, Foreign Policy, ABC News, Donna Moderna, Witness Journal,

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Casablanca medina | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Casablanca medina | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The Casablanca medina is a labyrinth. When I was shooting the street, a young boy said in French, in a heavy Moroccan accent: "It's too dangerous to try to visit the medina alone; a foreigner like you found with this big camera might be stabbed or beaten."
Well, I met some great people inside this medina and I'm not dead... Hamdoullah!- Serge Bouvet

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Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word "karoshi" came into common use around 1990, when Japanese workers began working longer hours in response to competition from overseas and the recession at the time. Despite increased awareness of the dangers of overwork, de-regulation and increased global competition means that Japanese workers are working harder than ever.


About 20 years ago, heart attacks or strokes were a symbol of ‘karoshi’ in Japan. Today, workers are committing suicide. Of the more than 30,000 suicides recorded 2009, 10,000 were believed to be related to work, according to data from the national police agency. Suicide triggered by overwork is particularly prevalent among white color workers, also known as “salarymen” in Japan. Salarymen devote long work hours and loyalty to companies in exchange for a life-time of employment and benefits.

 

With the recession of the 1990s and the lifting of a ban on the use of cheap temporary laborers, salarymen increasingly work longer hours because of a shortage of manpower and the fear of losing jobs.

Photo report's insight:

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.
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Benedyct Antifer's curator insight, March 26, 2013 12:39 PM

Travail impressionnant sur une société qui aliène de plus en plus la seule richesse dont elle dispose : les gens qui la compose...

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Fighting for a voice | Photojournalist: Bob Miller

Fighting for a voice | Photojournalist: Bob Miller | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In April 2010, United States ambassador Michael Ranneberger called on the young people of Kenya to seize active roles in the reform of their nation. After moving around the country interacting with young people, the envoy said he sensed “a sea change of attitude” among youths,“a tidal wave below the surface. The youth have woken up.” 

 

Less than three years earlier, post-election violence surrounding the rigged presidential elections left 1,200 dead and 600,000 displaced in Kenya. Yet, over the last two years, various grassroots initiatives led by youth have begun to improve quality of life for those in the direst of conditions. Termed “youth groups” on the streets, these initiatives could represent the future of long-term socioeconomic development in Kenya, and its neighboring countries. Members of the Usafi Youth Group in Kibera dig pit latrines to remove waste mounds in the slum, covering the newly fertilized earth with sustainable agriculture projects.

 

Other groups are building community bath houses in the poorest of areas, and organizing meetings to educate the community on the risk of HIV/AIDS. Within this progressive youth culture is the Kibera Olympic Boxing Club, a group of low-income adolescents from the slum who use sport to stay off the street and involved in the community. These youth are a microcosm of the greater movement toward reform, and a generation fighting for a voice.- Bob Miller

Photo report's insight:

Bob Miller is photographer, filmmaker and multimedia storyteller based in Alabama.

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The Disabled | Photojournalist: Ohm Phanphiroj

The Disabled | Photojournalist: Ohm Phanphiroj | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In Thailand, disabled individuals can be seen everywhere in the form of beggars, traveling the streets in Bangkok and asking for money. There are no laws intended to provide and improve the quality of life for these people. Roads, sidewalks, walkways are never equipped or adjusted to provide for wheelchairs or the blind. These unfortunate souls are considered a problem rather than as sharing in equal rights and status. They are looked down upon, although with a certain amount of sympathy. There are only a few facilities and organizations created to support and house them. Likewise, the budgets set aside for these places are minimal at best. Meager at worst.

 

The Disabled project is driven by the curiosity to understand how the disabled lives, functions and survives on a daily basis. In my search to learn more, I went to a male disabled rehabilitation and housing center on the outskirts of Bangkok. There the haunting and, at times, graphic images of an overburdened and failed care system can be seen. The place is both vastly under staffed and under budgeted, and the ratio of caregivers to patients is 1:40 or 50. Most of the patients living there have been abandoned by their families, not by choice but because their family has no means to take care of them, so subsequently they are brought to the center to be taken care of.

 

Patients are seen sleeping on the pavement out in the sun, tied to a secure pole or to a bed. The quality of the place is sub-standard, despite the good intentions of the few staffers who work there, with the condition of each patient varying, from physical to mental, to, in many cases, both.

It is my sincere desire to document the condition of the center along with the treatment of its patients. The images I have captured thus far are harrowing, haunting and very visceral. The feelings of loneliness and emptiness are prominent. I want to create a visual commentary that conveys these feelings along with the utter sense of despair and isolation I felt for the place and its patients.

 

With this project, I hope to help bridge the gap between those in need in our society and society itself. I wish to raise awareness and bring needed attention and better understanding of the existing conditions and to improve the quality of life for these people. I want to capture hope for the hopeless and dream for the few dreams the disabled have left. The project is my very personal and privileged journey into a space most do not care to venture, or simply refuse to acknowledge.- Ohm Phanphiroj

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Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty

Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Horse racing is a part of Naadam, a Mongolian festival that has been celebrated since the times of Genghis Khan. It is most recently held every July to commemorate the People's Revolution. Traditionally, the jockeys are children in these races. It is said that Mongols learn to ride before they can walk and feel safer on horseback than on the ground. Boys and girls as young as five are used as jockeys because a Naadam race is not a test for riders, but for horses. However, the races can be very dangerous, with hundreds of horses running at great speeds across a steppe of 12 to 28 kilometers. In preparing for Naadam, children take part in repeated practice races and help the trainers take care of the racehorses. According to some estimates, 150 to 180 thousand horses with more than 30 thousand child jockeys compete in over 500 races each year.

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