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Lu Nan’s Trilogy of Men | Photographer: Lu Nan 呂楠

Lu Nan’s Trilogy of Men | Photographer:  Lu Nan 呂楠 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Lu Nan’s Trilogy of Men: China’s Catholicism & Forgotten People, and 4 Seasons in Tibet

 

Influential Chinese Photographer Lu Nan 呂楠 is a man of mystery, shying away from cameras, the public and publicity. Lu has also been known to hide his name and movements under various pseudonyms. He applied for membership at Magnum Photos under the name Mao Xiaohu.

 

And while Lu once said it didn’t matter who the photographer was that took the pictures (good or bad), it is hard to ignore and not attribute to him his immense body of work, namely the ‘Trilogy’ series which took 15 years to complete. First in the trilogy were Lu’s photographs of patients at China’s mental hospitals titled ‘The Forgotten People, the state of Chinese psychiatric wards’.

 

This was followed by a documentary of the catholic church in China and pilgrimages made by its followers. The last were photographs of peasants in Tibet called ‘Four Seasons’, rumoured to be made whilst Lu was on the run from ‘unfriendlies’. In 2009, Lu also made controversial photographs of prisoners in Northern Myanmar camps.

Photo report's insight:

"Human lives should not be labeled. Labels cover our eyes and make many things invisible to us," Lu Nan said.


Legendary Chinese photographer Lu Nan shook the world with his pictures of people living on the edge of despair.

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Noir & blanc | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Noir & blanc | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I discovered photography when I became a father in 2008. Yes, it is the birth of my daughter that led me to buy my first camera, a Canon 40D. It is in 2010 that I had for the first prestigious client, the Courts of Auditors, a quasi-judicial body of the French government, to photograph the First President, Didier Migaud.

This little overview to the past, duotone black and white is necessary for me as a stylistic evidence. This gallery is not complete, more pictures will be added gradually.

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Kashmir | Photographer: Andy Spyra

Kashmir | Photographer: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Emerging photographer Andy Spyra (1984, Germany) is currently focusing on two personal, long-term projects in the Kashmir Valley, the location of the longest unresolved conflict in the history of the United Nations. Today, over 700,000 Indian soldiers and paramilitary forces are stationed in the region. This makes Kashmir the most highly militarised zone in the world.

Kashmir is not poor: unlike the rest of India it is rich in natural resources and most of its population has (by Indian standards) a good standard of living. But rising militancy, which began in the early 1990s, changed the valley’s fate and turned it into the so-called ‘Valley of Tears’. Before the partition of British India into the now archenemies India and Pakistan, Muslim Kashmir was an independent kingdom with its own culture and language. Nowadays, the people living in the region still feel more Kashmiri than they do Indian: they don’t want to belong to India, which is geographically, ethnologically and culturally so far removed from their own roots.

The Kashmir conflict has already lead to four wars in 1948, 1965, 1971 and 1999, and  resulted in the death of over 60,000 people, with a further 10,000 still missing. Although there have been marked improvements in bilateral relations between India and Pakistan in the past, the situation in Kashmir remains fragile and tense.

 

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The 13th floor | Photographer: David Gillanders

The 13th floor | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Paul Mann, and Marie Ward are living in desperate poverty in one of the remaining high rise block of flats in the Gorbals, Glasgow. The council accommodation they live in, which is scheduled for demolition, is riddled with dampness causing illness to their children. Both Marie and Paul are long term, third generation unemployed and are completely dependent on the state, not just for benefit but for help in caring for their 4 children. The family have since be relocated to a newly built townhouse in the Gorbals but continue to struggle." - David Gillanders

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Wanawake | Photographer: Martina BACIGALUPO

Wanawake | Photographer: Martina BACIGALUPO | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Every minute in the world a woman dies of childbirth. 99% of these women live in developing countries. More than half of them live in sub-Saharan Africa. For every maternal death, 20 women suffer pregnancy-related injuries, infections or diseases and, in some case, long term disabilities. The majority of maternal deaths and disabilities can be prevented through access to basic health-care services during pregnancy and delivery.

The more affected are women living in poverty, who lack the decision-making power and the financial resources to access basic health care.
The lack of progress in reducing maternal mortality highlights the low price placed on the lives of these women and testifies to their limited public voice.
In the urban western world a woman reaches a hospital in less than 7 minutes. In the Congo women who manage to reach a health center have walked, pregnant and alone for hours, often for days." - Martina Bacigalupo

Photo report's insight:

Martina Bacigalupo was born in 1978 in Genova.

She is member of Agence Vu in Paris.

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Zahida's curator insight, December 5, 2013 7:10 PM

This article interests me because of the major differeances in the avaerage time it takes for women to get to the hospital when they become pregnent. In the urban western world a women gets to the hospital while in the Congo, women get to the hospital after walking for hours or even days. Many people want to help in a specific way want to donate to a cause that they know that they can directly impact people.  The half the sky book concentrates on specific examples, while this article concentrates on one aspect of the overall goal that the Half the Sky book is trying to promote. 

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Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet,

Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet, | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Où vont tous ces pauvres indiens chaque jour que fait Shiva ?
Ces miséreux au mauvais karma, que la faim autant que le travail maigrit ?
Où vont donc ces mioches qu’on voit errer seul avec un seau ou un bac de pierre sur la tête? Où vont donc ces femmes voilées dans leur saris rouges où survit encore un sourire.
Ils s’en vont tous bosser comme des forçats, comme des esclaves.
Ils vont, dès potron-minet répéter leurs mouvements en silence ou en chantonnant.
Accroupis sur la caillasse presque de braise, ils se préparent pour l'enfer.
Et la misère les mâche au soleil." - Serge Bouvet

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Exploitation of Child Labour | Photographer: Fernando Moleres

Exploitation of Child Labour | Photographer: Fernando  Moleres | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Across the world, millions of children do extremely hazardous work in harmful conditions, putting their health and lives at risk. Their education, personal and social development is compromised by long working. They live with their infancy stolen, without a minimum possibility to develop their potentialities or possibilities of choice. The worst forms of child labour must be eradicated just now and governments, international institutions must push in this direction.

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Fighting for a voice | Photojournalist: Bob Miller

Fighting for a voice | Photojournalist: Bob Miller | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In April 2010, United States ambassador Michael Ranneberger called on the young people of Kenya to seize active roles in the reform of their nation. After moving around the country interacting with young people, the envoy said he sensed “a sea change of attitude” among youths,“a tidal wave below the surface. The youth have woken up.” 

 

Less than three years earlier, post-election violence surrounding the rigged presidential elections left 1,200 dead and 600,000 displaced in Kenya. Yet, over the last two years, various grassroots initiatives led by youth have begun to improve quality of life for those in the direst of conditions. Termed “youth groups” on the streets, these initiatives could represent the future of long-term socioeconomic development in Kenya, and its neighboring countries. Members of the Usafi Youth Group in Kibera dig pit latrines to remove waste mounds in the slum, covering the newly fertilized earth with sustainable agriculture projects.

 

Other groups are building community bath houses in the poorest of areas, and organizing meetings to educate the community on the risk of HIV/AIDS. Within this progressive youth culture is the Kibera Olympic Boxing Club, a group of low-income adolescents from the slum who use sport to stay off the street and involved in the community. These youth are a microcosm of the greater movement toward reform, and a generation fighting for a voice.- Bob Miller

Photo report's insight:

Bob Miller is photographer, filmmaker and multimedia storyteller based in Alabama.

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Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty

Naadam Portraits | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Horse racing is a part of Naadam, a Mongolian festival that has been celebrated since the times of Genghis Khan. It is most recently held every July to commemorate the People's Revolution. Traditionally, the jockeys are children in these races. It is said that Mongols learn to ride before they can walk and feel safer on horseback than on the ground. Boys and girls as young as five are used as jockeys because a Naadam race is not a test for riders, but for horses. However, the races can be very dangerous, with hundreds of horses running at great speeds across a steppe of 12 to 28 kilometers. In preparing for Naadam, children take part in repeated practice races and help the trainers take care of the racehorses. According to some estimates, 150 to 180 thousand horses with more than 30 thousand child jockeys compete in over 500 races each year.

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Portraits of Patagonian Cowboys | Photographer: Mustafah Abdulaziz for National Geographic

Portraits of Patagonian Cowboys | Photographer: Mustafah Abdulaziz for National Geographic | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Mustafah Abdulaziz is a documentary photographer based in Berlin, Germany. He has been a member of the international photography collective MJR since 2008. This work is from his series, Patagonian Cowboys.

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Human condition | Documentary photographers: Colin Finlay

Human condition | Documentary photographers: Colin Finlay | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Finlay has documented the human condition with compassion, empathy, and dignity for almost twenty years. His work has taken him around the world many times. He covered conflicts in Northern Ireland, Israel, and Haiti; was in Rwanda during the time of the genocide; and photographed imprisoned child soldiers, abandoned children dying from AIDS in Romania, and child laborers in Egypt’s “City of the Dead.” He has also documented the effects of climate change on the Arctic Circle and Antarctica as well as on people in locations such as the Sudan.

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Chineses | Photos Liu Zheng 刘铮

Chineses | Photos Liu Zheng 刘铮 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Liu Zheng est un photographe chinois né en 1969 dans le comté de Wuqiang, province de Hebei. Il passa son enfance dans la ville minière de Datong (province de Shanxi), avant de vivre et de travailler à Beijing.

En 1994, Liu Zheng commença de photographier des moments de vie dans lesquels des personnages chinois typiques ont été rencontrés dans des situations extrêmes et souvent inattendues. La série The Chinese tire le portrait d'une société en butte aux contradictions entre la culture traditionnelle et la modernisation. Elle présente un large échantillonnage de la société et montre les riches, les pauvres, les transsexuels, les mineurs, les acteurs d'opéra, aussi bien que les figures de cire des musées historiques.

De 1991 à 1997, Zheng a travaillé comme reporter pour le Workers’ Daily, un des journeaux chinois les plus lus, dans l'optique de montrer les liens historiques entre la propagande politique et l'idéologie communiste, plutôt que de viser les rapports de la photographie avec la vérité. Il commença de travailler sur le thème des Chinois à un moment de changements explosifs et de développement de l'art contemporain, catalysé par les réformes en cours. Dans ce contexte, Zheng utilise la photographie pour construire une fausse réalité. Les éclairages et les poses de ses photographies au format carré semblent un peu naïfs mais en réalité la mise en scène coexiste avec les éléments spontanés dans toute cette série.

Influencée à la fois par les œuvres de Diane Arbus et d'August Sander, la série The Chinese montre au spectateur une étude personnalisée de la culture chinoise, concentrée sur les aspects psychologiques les plus sombres. Un mélange de dure réalité et de romantisme, d'engagement et de détachement, tente de reconstituer l’histoire des Chinois par ce processus.

 

Publications The Chinese .- Göttingen, Allemagne, Steidl et New-York, International Center of Photography, 2004. (ISBN 3-86521-037-6)

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Trading to Extinction | Photojournalist: Patrick Brown

Trading to Extinction | Photojournalist: Patrick Brown | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Most people hear the term “poaching,” and they think of hunters gunning down endangered species like elephants and rhinos on the plains of Africa. But in many ways the heart of the illegal wildlife trade is not in Africa, but in Asia. It’s in rising countries like China, Thailand, Vietnam and Cambodia where the demand for illegal wildlife products is strongest, driving the hunting and the trafficking. And it’s in Asia where poaching is still going on in the forests of countries like Burma and Laos, in the last scraps of wilderness in one of the most densely populated parts of the world. Every year it’s estimated that up to 30,000 primates, 5 million birds, 10 million reptile skins and 500 million tropical fish are bought and sold in Asia.

 

That bloody trade is revealed by Patrick Brown’s stark black-and-white photographs, published in his new book, Trading to Extinction. The Bangkok-based Brown spent more than 10 years documenting the underbelly of the illegal wildlife trade in Asia, from ill-equipped rangers patrolling the forests of Thailand to markets in southern China, jam-packed with threatened species. He shows the shadowy smuggling routes that take wildlife products across poorly guarded borders, and shines a spotlight on the sheer inhumanity of man’s treatment of majestic animals like the endangered Indochinese tiger. Brown prowls the markets of Bangkok, where massive ivory elephant tusks—almost surely taken by a poacher—sit in a store window, mute symbols of a murderous trade. Another photograph shows a pile of tiger and snow leopard skins—worth three-quarters ofa million dollars—seized in Thailand’s Chitwan National Park.

 

Money is what drives the illegal wildlife trade, which is now worth as much as $10 billion globally. Brown notes that a poacher who kills a rhino and removes its horn in India gets $350, but that same horn will sell for $1,000 in a nearby market town, and as much as $370,000 once it reaches dealers in Hong Kong, Beijing or the Middle East. It’s little wonder that international criminal syndicates have gotten into the wildlife trade, which is now estimated to be the fifth most lucrative illegal enterprise in the world. Some of that money flows to international terrorists as well, making wildlife trafficking a security threat, as well as a conservation one.

 

The good news is that the world is beginning to get serious about wildlife trafficking. On Feb. 11 the U.S. announced a new national strategy for combating poaching, as well as a ban on commercial imports and exports of ivory. Last week British Prime Minister David Cameron hosted the London Conference on the Illegal Wildlife Trade, the highest-level summit ever on wildlife trafficking. Bringing a halt to poaching will require a commitment from developed nations like the U.S. and England. But as Patrick Brown’s moving photographs show, the battle will be fought in Asia.

Photo report's insight:

Patrick Brown is a multi award-winning English photographer based in Thailand. His work focuses on critical issues across the Asia region. Trading to Extinction is available through publisher Dewi Lewis.


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Best works | Photographer: ANDERS PETERSEN

Best works | Photographer: ANDERS PETERSEN | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Anders Petersen is noted for his intimate and personal documentary-style black-and-white photographs. He studied photography under Christer Stromholm in Sweden, 1966-1967. In 1967, he started to photograph the late-night regulars (prostitutes, transvestites, drunks, lovers, drug addicts) in a bar in Hamburg, Germany, named Café Lehmitz, and continued that project for three years. His photobook of the same name was published eight years later, in 1978, by Schirmer/Mosel in Germany, and then appeared in France (1979) and Sweden (1982). Café Lehmitz has since become regarded as a seminal book in the history of European photography.One of the photos from this series was later used as the cover art for Tom Waits' 1985 album Rain Dogs.

 

In 1970, he co-founded SAFTRA, the Stockholm group of photographers, with Kenneth Gustavsson. At the same time, he taught at Christer Stromholm's school. He has been director of the Göteborg School of Photography and Film. He began to photograph for magazines, and he continued his personal photo diary work, which continues to this day. He has photographed for extensive periods of time in prisons, mental asylums, and homes for old people.

 

In 1978, Petersen received a grant from the Swedish Authors' Foundation. In 2003, he was elected Photographer of the Year at the Recontres d'Arles. In 2007, he was one of four finalists for the £30,000 Deutsche Börse Photography Prize.

Petersen has published more than 20 books, mostly in Sweden, and has had solo and group exhibitions throughout Europe and Asia.

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Salt Water Tears | Photographer: Munem Wasif

Salt Water Tears | Photographer: Munem Wasif | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Every ecosystem has its fragile balance. That much we have already learnt. Scientists routinely now seek to document the excesses that will lead to imbalance, even where they can do nothing about them. And sometimes, just sometimes, legislation and implementation and eventually protection may follow.

In the far south-west of Bangladesh, Munem Wasif shows us just what these abstract-sounding paradigms mean in practice. Nobody knows certainly why the water levels are changing in the Bay of Bengal, but they are. In a famously low-lying country, more and more people are under threat of catastrophic flooding. Coastal erosion, too, is accelerating, a matter of grave concern in a country where (under the pressure of population) every inch of usable land is at a premium. 

Munem Wasif found a region where changes to a single measurable fact – salinity levels in the water table – can be seen to have affected every part of the matrix of balances. Salinity has risen. The old agriculture is no longer possible because the old plants simply can’t grow. Shrimping – a new industry – has grown up, largely for export, using fewer workers and threatening the livelihood of many others. Shrimping in turn exposes more land to salt or brackish water. Farmers are reduced to occasional labour. Established structures of work and the societies centred on work change and break down. 

Many people have to venture into the mangrove swamps of the Sundarbans (a national park on the Indian side of the border, but not yet on the Bangladeshi) to fish or to collect roofing materials which used to be available closer to hand. In the Sundarbans they are exposed to a terrifying catalogue of risk, including attack from dog sharks, crocodiles, king cobras and the Bengal tiger. Women (it’s always the women) have to go ever farther in search of fresh water. New diseases become frequent, obviously connected to all these changes, but not yet provably so. So it goes on, a kaleidoscope of interconnected shifts, not fully understood, and not half predictable with accuracy. 

Munem Wasif has not gone to this blighted region to show us the abstractions of climate-change experts or the theories of macro-economists. Photography deals in the particular, and this project deals in the very particular. Wasif is himself Bangladeshi. Not for him the flak-jacket, the adrenaline rush, and five hours in the red zone. These are his people, although not quite in his part of the country. The accent is different but the language is shared. Wasif in fact rented a motorcycle to complete this commission, and when he tells you the names of the people in the pictures it’s because he met them and heard them, and knew them a little. 

The pictures, then, are almost by definition subjective. Too much ink has been spilt trying to work out when and whether photographers tell the truth. These pictures are absolutely personal to Wasif, absolutely his expression of his sentiments. But that doesn’t stop them being also a remarkable – and true – document of what is happening in the interplay of some of the complex of variables in this corner of Bangladesh.

Photography reads big and small. Wasif shows you Johura Begum’s long arm reaching out to her husband as he dies of cancer of the liver, that simple tenderness is the only available healthcare in a village whose population are in desperate need. It’s a little tiny truth, certainly. The husband died, the woman lived on, widowed. The photographer was there, he knows. But it is also and at the same time a complex of many metaphors. There are many pictures like this because this scene has been played out so many times all over the world. It’s a picture ‘about’ infrastructure and financing, too, as well as morality and ethics. In another searing picture, containers of fresh water are dragged on foot in boats through clinging sterile mud. Shajhan Shiraj and his brothers from Gabura, we’re told, travel three hours in this kind of way every day. Stunted trees, clear water only in the distance, three men, three boats, and the keel-trail they etch in the mud. It’s not just a beautiful picture: the irony of boats travelling so painfully slowly by land with water as their only cargo is unimaginably painful. 

There is a powerful crossover in the way pictures work. Read these pictures only as little truths and they will wrench out your heart. Read them as big truths and they will drive you towards planning practical effort for change. you don’t need to know that Johura Begum’s husband was called Amer Chan to be moved to action by Wasif. 

We read about donor fatigue, compassion fatigue. Every viewer of these pictures will have at some point the sense of having seen them before. Salgado in the Sahel, just as shocking, maybe more. Very similar in feel and tonality. But it is not up to the photographers to provide us with new scenes. As long as those scenes are there and look the way they do, photographers will continue to show them to us. Some people will look at Wasif’s pictures here and call them derivative, and they’ll be right. But it isn’t fashion. There is not going to be a new length of trousers this season in the liver cancer business. Photographers can only do so much. If viewers are tired of being harrowed, tired of seeing these scenes one shouldn’t have to look at, perhaps we can understand that it’s the viewers who need to perk up their ideas, not the photographers. Munem Wasif, for one, is doing his bit. Now it’s up to us. 

– Francis Hodgson
Head of Photographs, Sotheby's
Chairman of Judges, Prix Pictet
From the essay Munem Wasif: Tiny Truths, Big Truths 

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Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders

Street children of Ukraine | Photographer: David Gillanders | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In 2000 I was travelling through Russia and other parts of the former Soviet Union developing a project on the transmission of HIV through intravenous drug use. I stumbled upon a group of young kids who were being chased from a McDonalds restaurant by a very aggressive restaurant manager. I intervened to prevent the manager beating the kids on the street. The kids had been removing leftovers from empty tables. This act led me into an underground world where young children live and die in the most squalid and horrible conditions I have ever experienced. Orphans, runaways, wee broken souls fending for themselves in a cruel and unforgiving world.- David Gillanders

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Shadows in Greece | Photojournalist: Enri Canaj

Shadows in Greece | Photojournalist: Enri Canaj | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The centre of Athens, as I first remember it, was full of life.

During the period before the Olympic Games, there was great development. New hotels appeared in order to host the visitors, shops, restaurants and cafes kept sprouting up, it was full of people everywhere. All this happened within a few years. It was as if the city put on new clothes. During the days of the Olympics, the city was clean and well-guarded. You would not see street- merchants, drug-addicts or immigrants, just tourists and people who came in order to have a good time. In my eyes, it looked like another place.

 

As time passed, the city started deteriorating and gradually recovered its previous character: the everyday life that we all knew, with the junkies, the street-merchants, the the immigrants and the prostitutes.

Time passes fast. The city is now fading. Some people abandon it due to the crisis. Many shops and hotels have shut down, the centre is now almost deserted. People fear they will get ripped-off, they hear that this happens all the time. They no longer feel like going out and wandering about like before. They even fear seeing all the poverty and destitution, the drug-users who will rip you off for their shot, the women prostituting themselves.

 

But for me, those people were always there. I found them all there when I first arrived as a 9-year old child. They were always there when I was growing up. They are somehow trapped in their lives, subsisting in terrible circumstances, in squalid houses with insufficient hygiene.

Photo report's insight:

Enri Canaj was born in Tirana, Albania, in 1980. He spent his early childhood there and moved with his family to Greece in 1991, immediately after the opening of the borders. He is based in Athens and covers stories in Greece and the Balkans.

 

He studied photography at the Leica Academy in Athens. In 2007 he took part in a British Council project on migration, attending a year-long workshop with Magnum photographer Nikos Economopoulos.

Since 2008, he has been a freelance photographer for major publications such as Time Magazine Lightbox, Newsweek, Le monde Diplomatique (German edition),TO VIMA, TA NEA, Tachydromos and VIMAGAZINO. A sample of his work has been exhibited at the Cultural Foundation of the National Bank of Greece in Athens and Salonica, at the Bilgi Santral in Istanbul, the European Parliament in Brussels and the Athens Photo Festival.

 

He has been working in the Balkans, mainly Kosovo and Albania, as well as Greece, focusing on migration and the recent crisis.

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CAPITOLIO | Photographer: Christopher Anderson

CAPITOLIO | Photographer: Christopher Anderson | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word ‘capitolio’ refers to the domed building that houses a government. Here, the city of Caracas, Venezuela, is itself a metaphorical capitolio building. The decaying Modernist architecture, with a jungle growing through the cracks, becomes the walls of this building and the violent streets become the corridors where the human drama plays itself out in what President Hugo Chavez called a ‘revolution.’

Originally published as a traditional book in 2010 by RM, “Capitolio” is an intimate journey through a time of revolution in Hugo Chavez’ Caracas, Venezuela. This series was photographed between 2004 and 2008.

 

Photo report's insight:

Christopher Anderson is a photographer and member of the Magnum Photos agency

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Ioan Tasi's comment, May 13, 2013 5:12 AM
wonderful.
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Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂

Overwork to suicide | Photojournalist: Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The word "karoshi" came into common use around 1990, when Japanese workers began working longer hours in response to competition from overseas and the recession at the time. Despite increased awareness of the dangers of overwork, de-regulation and increased global competition means that Japanese workers are working harder than ever.


About 20 years ago, heart attacks or strokes were a symbol of ‘karoshi’ in Japan. Today, workers are committing suicide. Of the more than 30,000 suicides recorded 2009, 10,000 were believed to be related to work, according to data from the national police agency. Suicide triggered by overwork is particularly prevalent among white color workers, also known as “salarymen” in Japan. Salarymen devote long work hours and loyalty to companies in exchange for a life-time of employment and benefits.

 

With the recession of the 1990s and the lifting of a ban on the use of cheap temporary laborers, salarymen increasingly work longer hours because of a shortage of manpower and the fear of losing jobs.

Photo report's insight:

Shiho Fukada 深田 志穂 is a Japanese photojournalist currently working out of Beijing, China. Her clientele consists of The New York Times, MSNBC, Le Monde, the Chicago Tribune and the New York magazine, among others. She won the Grand Prize in Editor and Publisher Magazine’s Ninth Annual Photos of the Year contest in 2008. Fukada also won an Alicia Patterson Journalism Fellowship in 2010 to research and photograph Japan's disposable workers.

Fukada majored in English literature and first worked in fashion advertising as an account executive. She borrowed a 35 mm SLR camera and started making photos.
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Benedyct Antifer's curator insight, March 26, 2013 9:39 AM

Travail impressionnant sur une société qui aliène de plus en plus la seule richesse dont elle dispose : les gens qui la compose...

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PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto

PART I: CHILDREN - Rue 24, Phnom Penh | Photojournalist: Mikel Aristregi Prieto | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Article 18 of the Constitution of the Kingdom of Cambodia: “the state will protect the rights of children, particularly the right to life, education, and protection during times of war, in addition to protection against economic and sexual exploitation”.

At present Cambodia has around 14 million inhabitants, a number which has increased favourably in recent years due to the period of relative peace the country has experienced since 1993.  Depending on the time of year, the capital, Phnom Penh, has between two and three million inhabitants.

In a country where 81% of the population gain their livelihood from agriculture, the climate determines everything.  However, the extreme poverty in rural areas, the non-existence of technological farming, climatic instability, etc., are all factors which force the population to emigrate to the city in hope of finding a better life.  Unfortunately, what usually happens in these cases is that life does not become better, but the complete opposite.  Due to the parents’ inability to look after all the family members, Cambodian boys and girls have the tendency to start fending for themselves from a very early age.

 

 In the capital, approximately half the children and teenagers who look after themselves have arrived alone from surrounding provinces, with only a few coins in their pockets.  Some of the children will return to their villages after a few days, weeks, or even months.  Others will spend so long on the street that it becomes impossible to return, simply because they forget who they are and where they come from.  At their roots there is always a completely unstructured family unit, in most cases because of extreme poverty, AIDS, or alcoholism which almost always transforms into domestic violence.

Organised into small groups, the bonds that the children build amongst themselves are strong, deep and sincere; as primitive as the survival instinct itself.  Malnutrition, illness, drug abuse, sexual harassment from tourists, traffic…these are all daily threats that the children face.  Perhaps, above all of those, the lack of affection from society, the feeling of abandonment and the shortage of self-confidence could be seen as the strongest and most pressing threat of all.  Forgotten by their politicians who are immersed in dismantling their country in the shortest possible time, at the moment the only valid option the children have to leave the street is to go through an NGO.  This, however, will never be the solution to the problem.

 

Photo report's insight:

Another link of photo documentary: http://www.fotovisura.com/user/MikeA/view/rue-24-phnom-penh-kampuchea

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Bike kill | Photographer: Julie Glassberg

Bike kill | Photographer: Julie Glassberg | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Julie Glassberg on Photographing the Notorious and Unpredictable Black Label Bike Club

 

The Black Label Bike Club is known as the first “outlaw bicycle club.” It was created in 1992 by Jacob Houle and Per Hanson in Minneapolis, Minnesota and has chapters nationwide. They are one of the main contributors to the rise of tall bike culture and organized jousting competitions. This destructive, rebel culture revolves around the unlikeliest non-threatening object: the bicycle.

 

Based out of Brooklyn, Black Label represent a blend of punk, grunge and hippie culture. They are an independent community who sees themselves rebelling against the system. In a society that some feel pushes them to consume, focus on money and overly-use technology, this group of young people seems to be resisting and fighting against it. Their community is mainly based on the bike culture, art and on the real value of relationships.

 

They are a tight family, caring for each other, sharing meals, partying, or creating art together. Amidst an ongoing recession, and social pressures mounting, how does the young generation respond to it? Although they seem to be the carefree, self-destroying youth, they are quite aware of the situation today. As everyone, they love, hate, and also have their fears and concerns.

 

Julie Glassberg is a French born, award winning photographer currently living and working in New York. Her work is mainly based on the diversity of world cultures; subcultures; portraits; documentary projects. These images are from her series, Bike Kill, which documents the culture surrounding the Black Label Bike Club.

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Changsha | Photographer: Rian Dundon

Changsha | Photographer: Rian Dundon | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

“I said I was going to do the first book of China without a picture of Mao in there, but he slipped in in the background,” Mr. Dundon said. “I’ll leave that up to the reader to find.”

Mr. Dundon writes in his introduction to the project on Emphas.is (http://www.emphas.is/web/guest/discoverprojects?projectID=616) about how he sought to make pictures “that didn’t necessarily read as China.” Instead, he presents a personal narrative, an exploration of a city and the region around it.

“There’s a very prescribed version of China that I think Western photographers, or visual people, kind of adhere to,” he said over the phone from Sacramento, where he lives. He wanted to avoid the photographic clichés that often come out of China — masses of people, skyscrapers, the color red, Tiananmen Square, poverty juxtaposed with sleek modernity. It was the only way he felt he could create something honest, “and not this kind of post-colonial, white guy goes to China” project.

He wanted to know people, and to explore those relationships with his photography — as he’d always done in his work.

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Thailand: Tattoo Festival II | Travel Photographer: Gavin Gough

Thailand: Tattoo Festival II | Travel Photographer: Gavin Gough | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

One of the most colourful and bizarre festivals in the world takes place outside Bangkok this Saturday. Gavin Gough joins the devotees for black and white documentary.

 

Gavin Gough produces stock photographs for Getty and Lonely Planet images. His vibrant stock collection includes images from more than forty countries which have been reproduced in hundreds of newspapers, magazines and books and are regularly featured in publications such as National Geographic, Geo, Vogue, The New York Times, The Guardian, and many more. His stock images have appeared on everything from postage stamps to magazine covers and billboards.

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Kushti - Indian Wrestling | Photographer: Sanjit Das

Kushti - Indian Wrestling | Photographer: Sanjit Das | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

KUSHTI - Traditional Indian wrestling

 

Indian wrestlers, commonly known as pahalwans have been practicing the three thousand year old sport known as 'Kushti', a form of wrestling, in its traditional form in different akharas (traditional indian fight club). Kushti has a long tradition. It used to be supported by local maharajas in the old days and till date is hugely supported and financed by the rural network and the government alike. The wrestlers continue the rigorous schedule of waking up at 5 am everyday and practice more than 6 hours every day. Normal daily diet of a wrestler is 5kgs of vegetables, 3 litres of milk, amongst other things.

 

They live together in small rooms around the mud arena with very few belongings. They have been compared to holy men because of their celibacy and dedication. Though Kushti has managed to retain its traditions alive, few changes have been made to accomodate the modernity (mats, clothing, shoes etc.) in this sport, enabling the wrestlers to participate in various International arenas.

These are few photos of the pahalwans at Sri Hanuman Akhara in Delhi.

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