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Noir & blanc | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Noir & blanc | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I discovered photography when I became a father in 2008. Yes, it is the birth of my daughter that led me to buy my first camera, a Canon 40D. It is in 2010 that I had for the first prestigious client, the Courts of Auditors, a quasi-judicial body of the French government, to photograph the First President, Didier Migaud.

This little overview to the past, duotone black and white is necessary for me as a stylistic evidence. This gallery is not complete, more pictures will be added gradually.

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Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres

Calcutta | Photojournalist: Fernando Moleres | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Photo report's insight:

Fernando Moleres was born in Bilbao, Spain in 1963. He began work as a nurse in his home village, traveling in 1987 to pursue that calling in Nicaragua, during the Sandinista period. It was there that Moleres began to appreciate the value of photography and to teach himself how to do it. During the early 1990s, he combined nursing work with long periods traveling and doing photo projects, such as Children at Work, which lasted several years and took him to many countries. His photos have appeared in a number of international publications, such as Stern, Le Figaro Magazine, Le Monde 2, La Republica, Io Donna, The Independent and The Sunday Times Magazine. Moleres has published two books and has had more than 20 solo exhibitions worldwide. His honors include a Picture of the Year 2011, two previous World Press Photo prizes (in 2008 and 1998), a W. Eugene Smith Grant, a Erna and Victor Hasselblad Foundation Grant, and a Lucia Award 2012 Deeper Perspectives Award, among others. Moleres is now based in Barcelona.

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Comment rendre une photo poétique | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Comment rendre une photo poétique | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Concernant le traiment de la couleur ou du noir et blanc, voilà une photo qui m'a posée problème au départ. Pour cette photo-ci, l'ensemble des lignes verticales, de la forme triangulaire des deux sujets, les rectangles constitués par la grille, le panneau publicitaire  JCDecaux et le bâtiment lui-même aurait perdu de leur potentialité poétique si la photo avait été en couleur. En outre, le traitement noir et blanc accentue l'intemporalité et l'irréalité de l'image, ou tout au moins une certaine ambiguïté qui ne m'est pas déplaisante. Et l’ambiguïté d'une photographie n'en constitue-il pas le principal atout esthétique?

Photo report's insight:

En poésie, en chanson, en littérature, en musique, la répétition donne du rythme, elle ponctue poétiquement l’énoncé. Ici, l’écho visuel relayé par la récurrence des formes géométriques, de mon propre point de vue, nourrie la cohérence de cette photographie. En prenant l’exemple de la photo ci-dessus, la somme d’indices plastiques connectés entre eux, comme les lignes verticales, les cadres rectangulaires, le disque formé par le panneau d’interdiction, sont autant de signal rythmique qui suggère une relation riche en interprétations dont je vous laisse la liberté d’en  trouver les clés selon votre culture personnelle ou vos émotions propres.

 

L’œil est en effet captivé par la répétition des motifs qui, stylistiquement, introduit des relations supplémentaires comme l’écho visuel de la passante en jilbab et celle en sari sur l’affiche. Ainsi, les répétition visuelles rapprochés par leur signifiant et leur signifié étant confronté : ils deviennent des point-clefsde l’image, comme ils le seraient, en d’autres termes des mots clés d’une poésie...

 

 

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Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra

Kashmir | Photojournalist: Andy Spyra | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

I first came to Kashmir in the early spring of 2007 at the end of a motorcycle trip across India and I fell in love with the people, the light, and the atmosphere of this remote place. But as much as I love it, the political situation of the valley continues to bring disorder and conflict. 

Currently there are two conflicts in Kashmir, and each is tightly woven into the other: The more known conflict is the international, atomically loaded border dispute between India and its archenemy, Pakistan, regarding the affiliation of Kashmir between the two states. The other, less known one, is the inner-Kashmiri conflict on the Indian side of the border (which is two- thirds of the complete territory), where the people struggle for independence from India.  I have spent the last two years documenting this conflict, most recently in the summer of 2009 when I spent two months on the Indian side.

I attended meetings of parents who have had children disappear without leaving a note or ever coming back. I was invited into homes where family members mourned the rape and murder of two young girls by paramilitary forces.  I photographed a family whose sons were shot during one of the countless demonstrations.  These experiences didn‘t differ from my last two trips to Kashmir - the political and social climate remained the same as it was when I left the region half a year prior. The slogans were also the same during the countless demonstrations against the Indian army, the symbol of the occupation of what the Kashmiris call their soil: “Ham ka chate? Azadi!"- "What do we want? Freedom!" 

Looking over the sixty-year history of this conflict, it seems highly unlikely that the people of Kashmir will gain independence in the foreseeable future and that the world will see an independent Kashmir again. This strategic region is too important for either nation to ever let it go.- Andy Spyra

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Hijras, the third sex | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel

Hijras, the third sex | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Noisy and garish, an air of the notorious surrounds them as they walk through the streets. People shrink back when they pass. They are ridiculed and scorned, yet people are wary of incurring their wrath. They are stigmatized as social outcasts, yet fear of their curse inspires caution. For despite their humble status on the lowest rung of the Indian caste system, they wield a mighty cultic power- and in this they are worldwide unique.

 

They are creatures of the twilight, womanly souls in men's bodies, neither male nor female. According to Hindu mythology, they have the power to bless and to curse, to bestow fertility or deny it. They challenge the traditional dichotomy of gender - for they are the third sex. Their lives are full of contradictions, to which their demeanor testifies. Failing to conform to traditional gender roles, they are consigned to the difficult life of social outcasts. They are frequently the victims of discrimination, abuse and intimidation. Indian civil law recognizes only two sexes, and section 377 of the Indian Penal Code criminalizes all sexual acts that do not serve the purpose of procreation.

 

As members of a sexual minority, hijras - as they are commonly known in India - are denied the right to lead 'normal', independent lives. They are frequently subjected to raids, arrests and even rape by the police. Often rejected in childhood by families who feared losing their social standing, most hijras have not completed any formal education or training. They are largely denied 'normal' jobs. Hijras are not allowed to vote, to marry or to obtain a passport. They survive by soliciting 'donations' from business owners during Holi and Diwali - India's two most important religious festivals - or by blessing newlyweds and newborns with their dancing and singing for a fee. The alternative is prostitution.- Isabell Zipfel

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Le village d’Abhaneri | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter

Le village d’Abhaneri | Serge Bouvet, photographe reporter | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Abhaneri the village is close to the city of Jaipur. It is a visual treasure. I pressed the green countryside and I discovered a village sparsely populated, without tourists without cars but very rich in architectural history. This village was for me, a true cultural recreation, a haven of peace where I stayed for a whole day.

Photo report's insight:

FRENCH: Le village Abhaneri, près du fort d'Amber, se situe à 20 minutes de voitures de la ville de Jaipur. C'est un véritable trésor visuel. Je voulais fuir le Fort d'Amber qui était bondé de touristes américains et français qui montaient sur les éléphants pour 400 roupies. Je me suis enfoncé dans la campagne verdoyante, et, surprise des surprises, je suis tombé sur un village peu peuplé, sans touristes, sans voitures mais très riche en histoire architecturale. Ce village a été pour moi, une véritable récréation culturelle, un havre de paix où je suis resté une journée entière.

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Rickshaw Wallahs | The Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy

Rickshaw Wallahs | The Travel Photographer: Tewfic El-Sawy | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

" The government of Bengal had announced plans to completely ban the rickshaws, saying that the grueling work violates the pullers human rights, the argument was rejected by the rickshaw pullers with huge protests. Almost all of the pullers I spoke to were from the state of Bihar, one of India's poorest states. The rickshaws carry business people, live poultry, school children, the sick to the hospitals, fruit to the markets, and even prostitutes." - Tewfic El-Sawy

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Sunil Janah dies

Sunil Janah dies | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
NEW YORK — Sunil Janah, an Indian photographer who achieved international fame with his pictures of the famine that devastated Bengal in 1943 and 1944, died June 21 at his home in Berkeley, Calif. He was 94.
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Kushti - Indian Wrestling | Photographer: Sanjit Das

Kushti - Indian Wrestling | Photographer: Sanjit Das | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

KUSHTI - Traditional Indian wrestling

 

Indian wrestlers, commonly known as pahalwans have been practicing the three thousand year old sport known as 'Kushti', a form of wrestling, in its traditional form in different akharas (traditional indian fight club). Kushti has a long tradition. It used to be supported by local maharajas in the old days and till date is hugely supported and financed by the rural network and the government alike. The wrestlers continue the rigorous schedule of waking up at 5 am everyday and practice more than 6 hours every day. Normal daily diet of a wrestler is 5kgs of vegetables, 3 litres of milk, amongst other things.

 

They live together in small rooms around the mud arena with very few belongings. They have been compared to holy men because of their celibacy and dedication. Though Kushti has managed to retain its traditions alive, few changes have been made to accomodate the modernity (mats, clothing, shoes etc.) in this sport, enabling the wrestlers to participate in various International arenas.

These are few photos of the pahalwans at Sri Hanuman Akhara in Delhi.

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Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda

Narmada | Photojournalist: Samuel Aranda | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"The Narmada River project created by the Indian Government involves the construction of 30 large, 135 medium and 3000 small dams to harness the waters of the Narmada river and its tributaries. The proponents of the dam claim that this plan would provide large amounts of water and electricity which are required for development purposes. Opponent of the dam question the basic assumptions of the Narmada Valley Development Plan and believe that its plan is unjust and inequitable…" - Samuel Aranda

Photo report's insight:

Aranda began to work as a photographer for newspapers El País and El Periódico de Catalunya at the age of 19. Two years later he traveled to the Middle East, where he covered the Israeli–Palestinian conflict for the Spanish news agency EFE.

In 2004 Aranda begun working for AFP, covering stories in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and Africa. The photojournalist association ANIGP-TV awarded Arandas feature documentary about African immigrants trying to reach Europe with the Spanish National Award of Photography. Since 2006 he is working as a freelance photojournalist.

In 2011 Aranda covered the Arab Spring in Tunisia, Egypt, Libya and Yemen. In February 2012 he was awarded the World Press Photo of the Year 2011. The winning picture shows an a woman embracing her son, wounded during clashes against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh in Sanaa, Yemen, part of the Arab Spring.

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Autorickshaw | Photographer: Serge Bouvet

Autorickshaw | Photographer: Serge Bouvet | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

Autorickshaws are common all over India, and provide cheap and efficient transportation. New auto rickshaws run on CNG and are environmentally friendly. Autorickshaws are found in cities, villages and in the countryside.


There are two types of autorickshaws in India. In older versions the engines were situated below driver's seat. In newer versions engines are in rear portion. They normally run on petrol, CNG and diesel. The seating capacity of a normal rickshaw is 4, including driver. 

There are also six-seater rickshaws in parts of Maharashtra. In cities and towns across India it is the backbone of city transport. Normally their fare rates are controlled by the government with traffic meters.

CNG autos were distinguishable from the erstwhile petrol-powered autos by having a green and yellow livery as opposed to the earlier black and yellow. Certain local governments are pushing for four-stroke engines instead of the current two-stroke versions.

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Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet,

Misery under the sun of Rajasthan | Photographer: Serge Bouvet, | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

"Où vont tous ces pauvres indiens chaque jour que fait Shiva ?
Ces miséreux au mauvais karma, que la faim autant que le travail maigrit ?
Où vont donc ces mioches qu’on voit errer seul avec un seau ou un bac de pierre sur la tête? Où vont donc ces femmes voilées dans leur saris rouges où survit encore un sourire.
Ils s’en vont tous bosser comme des forçats, comme des esclaves.
Ils vont, dès potron-minet répéter leurs mouvements en silence ou en chantonnant.
Accroupis sur la caillasse presque de braise, ils se préparent pour l'enfer.
Et la misère les mâche au soleil." - Serge Bouvet

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The coalfields of Jharia | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel

The coalfields of Jharia | Photographer: Isabell Zipfel | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

In Jharia, in the federal state of Jharkhand, around 600,000 people live in the middle of one of India's biggest coal mining areas. There's nothing in it for most of them. Quite the opposite: the soil, the water and the air are now contaminated, of all things in an area that was previously rich in woodland. 
The story of Jharia is the story of how the greed for profit, vested interests and the thirst for power have prevailed and led to one of the areas richest in minerals in India remaining so economically backward. For the mining marginalises the poor and deepens social inequality in the name of economic development, from which mostly only metropolises like Delhi, Bangalore and Mumbai profit. 


Shortly after 1971, the coal mines were nationalised. Since then, their operator is the BCCL (Bharat Coking Coal Limited) which thus controls one of the biggest coal deposits in India and one of the biggest in the whole of Asia. BCCL conducts mainly opencast mining. Mostly illegally, since in 97% of the cases no licence has been granted. Opencast mining is more profitable than deep mining. The productivity and extracted quantities are significantly higher than in deep mining and cost less. In Jharia, coal is mined in the villages, next to the houses, in short, on people's doorsteps. Even on the streets, on railway lines, in the station itself, which is not a station any more, coal is mined. 


Really, the mined area should be filled with sand and water afterwards, so it can be cultivated again. For cost reasons, however, this never happens, which leads to the coal seams coming into contact with oxygen and catching fire. India has the most coal blazes worldwide. BCCL representatives estimate there are 67 fires in Jharia alone.

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SCHOOL FOR LESS FORTUNATE | Photographer: ALTAF QADRI

SCHOOL FOR LESS FORTUNATE | Photographer: ALTAF QADRI | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

07 November 2012

New Delhi, India

Every morning, children from nearby slums arrive in small groups, barefoot and carrying mats and brooms and start cleaning a portion of a land under a metro rail bridge, which will be their school for the rest of the morning. Rajesh Kumar Sharma, along with his friend, founded the free school for underprivileged children under a metro bridge a year ago. He teaches at least 45 children every day. Sharma, a 40-year-old father of three from Uttar Pradesh, India's most populous state, was forced to drop out of college in his third year due to financial difficulties. He didn't want other children to face the same difficulties, so he decided to start the free school.

 

He persuaded local laborers and farmers to allow their children to attend his school instead of working to add to the family income. He prepares these children for admission to government schools and hopes to equip them with the tools necessary to overcome their poverty. Millions of dollars are given to fund the education of poor children in India, however it often doesn't reach them because of corruption and arduous administrative procedures.

Photo report's insight:

TECHNICAL INFORMATIONSHUTTER SPEED: 1/320ISO: 100F-STOP: 1.4FOCAL LENGTH: 50CAMERA: Canon EOS 5D Mark II

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Yoga performers | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty

Yoga performers | Photographer: Tomasz Gudzowaty | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

There are many interpretations of yoga, both in India and in the western world. In the Vedic religious tradition, yoga is seen as a pathway to achieving spiritual enlightenment through physical training and as a way of living in harmony with your body and nature. It is also an accepted form of gymnastics and is often used as therapy. Yoga, with its Indian roots stretching back 2000 years, is not typically associated with sport since it does not involve any competition. However, every three years, pilgrims, spiritual masters, and yogis travel to India for the Kumbh Mela Hindu feast. Different schools and sects meet to display their achievements in the practice of yoga and pranayama (control over the breath).


It’s the biggest gathering of people in the world. One of Shiva’s manifestations, the god Nataraja, is the patron saint of the event. Over time, the rules of competition were formally organized and most recently, yoga asana has been included in modern sport yoga. Yogis who participate in the contest are separated into age groups and perform in singles, pairs, or groups. But even with all these formal rules and regulations, the technical aspect does not eclipse the spiritual. The official rules of the Yoga Federation of India state that “while performing yoga positions the contestant should show his/her happiness and spirituality.” This helps keep contestants in touch with teachings of the ancient Hindu masters, who regarded happiness as a task well within the reach of all humans.

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A Tale of Two Slums | Photographer: Stephen Dupont

A Tale of Two Slums | Photographer: Stephen Dupont | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

There are two excellent photographic essays of Polaroids made in the Mumbai slum Dharavi and the Senen slum of Jakarta by Stephen Dupont, an Australian photographer.

Dharavi is one of the world's largest slum and lies on prime real estate in the middle of India's financial capital, Mumbai and has a population estimated to be 1 million. Many businesses flourish in this slum, such as traditional pottery and textiles, a recycling industry, which generate an estimated $650 million turnover a year.

As for the Senen slum, it's a trackside slum in central Jakarta. It's also a center for recycling, and its inhabitants live cheek to jowl with the thundering trains.

  Stephen Dupont has produced a photographs of fragile cultures and marginalized peoples, which capture the human dignity of his subjects, and do so with great intimacy and often in some of the world’s most dangerous regions. His work has earned him prestigious prizes, including a Robert Capa Gold Medal citation from the Overseas Press Club of America; a Bayeux War Correspondent’s Prize; and first places in the World Press Photo, Pictures of the Year International, the Australian Walkleys, and Leica/CCP Documentary Award.

His work has been featured in The New Yorker, Aperture, Newsweek, Time, GQ, Esquire, French and German GEO, Le Figaro, Liberation, The Sunday Times Magazine, The Independent, The Guardian, The New York Times Magazine, Stern, The Australian Financial Review Magazine, and Vanity Fair.

He has held major exhibitions in London, Paris, New York, Sydney, Canberra, Tokyo, and Shanghai, and at Perpignan’s Visa Pour L’Image, China’s Ping Yao and Holland’s Noorderlicht festivals.


A Tale of Two Slums Part I: 

http://stephendupont.squarespace.com/essays/a-tale-of-two-slums-part-i

A Tale of Two Slums Part II:

http://stephendupont.squarespace.com/essays/a-tale-of-two-slums-part-ii

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Pooja Singh's comment, October 23, 2013 5:50 AM
Our homes and dreams are being taken away from us: Campa Cola Compound Story - The Facts http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lZsivIMNiOY Show your support by sharing the video and by signing a petition onhttp://bit.ly/savecampacola
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Terror Beat of Acid | Photos : Khaled Hasan

Terror Beat of Acid | Photos : Khaled Hasan | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it
Khaled Hasan is a Documentary Photographer. He has been awarded as 2008 All Roads Photography Program of National Geographic Society for his Documentary. Living Stone is one of his long term Project.

 

From Khaled Hasan’s work, “Terror Beat of Acid.”  In January 2010, 23-year-old Nasrina’s husband attacked her with acid. He was not satisfied with the dowry her parents paid. After two years of marriage, he wanted more. Her mother, who sells rice cakes to earn a living, refused to pay more. Her husband beat her up till she fainted, and when she was unconscious he threw acid on her face, neck and hands. Acid melts the tissues and even dissolves bones. Often eyes and ears are permanently damaged. Many victims have to undergo dozens of reconstructive surgeries to lead an independent life. No funding is available for cosmetic surgery, and most victims are from rural areas and can never afford expensive treatments. As such they are scarred for life and very few ever get married.

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Child labour in the coalmines of India | PHOTOGRAPHER : SUZANNE LEE

Child labour in the coalmines of India | PHOTOGRAPHER : SUZANNE LEE | BLACK AND WHITE | Scoop.it

The day SUZANNE LEE walked into the minefields of Jharia, in Dhanbad town, of the state of Jharkhand, India, I changed.

SUZANNE LEE went to Dhanbad with an idea in mind to document the families of coal miners who lived above brittle ground with a century-old inferno just beneath the surface. She was stunned by what she saw, the conditions were terrible… and the mines were filled with children, sent out to work in the mines as early as 5AM every day.

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